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Commanders are dropping like flies this year


MDDieselPilot

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1 minute ago, Bode said:


Threw this in to the google and no returns. Details?


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Shaw Viper last summer...AIB link is in that thread, but:

"Evidence also indicates the MP was not fully engaged on the challenges of flying a night instrument approach due to his unsuccessful attempt to conduct his first ever AAR at night, which is not allowed by Air Force regulations."

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3 hours ago, Day Man said:

Shaw Viper last summer...AIB link is in that thread, but:

"Evidence also indicates the MP was not fully engaged on the challenges of flying a night instrument approach due to his unsuccessful attempt to conduct his first ever AAR at night, which is not allowed by Air Force regulations."

The way it's worded makes this fact somewhat ambiguous: this was his first ever attempt at AAR. And it was at night. One of just many ways his entire chain of command let him down that night.

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On 4/18/2021 at 9:14 PM, pawnman said:

Oof. So they relieved a commander because some crew chief left their iPad in the inlet and the aircrew didn't spot it on the walk around? 

It's not always aircrew doing engine runs. 

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On 4/18/2021 at 10:14 PM, pawnman said:

Oof. So they relieved a commander because some crew chief left their iPad in the inlet and the aircrew didn't spot it on the walk around? 

A friend of mine, stationed at another Global Strike base, stated his unit sent multiple people to Dyess to support the multiple maintenance-related safety investigations occurring there now. It would seem that the firing resulted from more than a single mishap. 

Edited by Muscle2002
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57 minutes ago, Muscle2002 said:

A friend of mine, stationed at another Global Strike base, stated his unit sent multiple people to Dyess to support the multiple maintenance-related safety investigations occurring there now. It would seem that the firing resulted from more than a single mishap. 

Makes more sense.

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It's not always aircrew doing engine runs. 

It should never be aircrew doing engine runs. That’s an MX function, pilots should stay away.

I took it more to mean aircrew are not the only people who run the engines, but yeah let mx do mx runs.
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5 hours ago, SurelySerious said:

 


I took it more to mean aircrew are not the only people who run the engines, but yeah let mx do mx runs.

 

I was on a MRT in Mildenhall getting a E-3 repaired, our AC  LtCol sat the right seat for me so I could troubleshoot. He was shocked and got educated on what we do and try to do plus deduce what a pilot see's when the write up was noticed. We were doing stuff he wouldn't think of trying. MX vs Op's run engines  with totally different checklists. During my 89th days 86 to 91 the Crew Chiefs certified by a IP had to taxi the jets VC-137's and VC-135B's down to the hammer head due to no high power run spots on the ramp at Andrews. Plus taxi them during Preflight to the VIP spot in front of Base Ops. Back in the SAC days Tanker crews who were the last to land for the day usually got tasked  to do power engine runs when water injection was required, when SAC went away AMC came down and told MX they could do all 4 to water, before MX was only allowed 2 to water. I bet the young guys are going huh water?

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I bet the young guys are going huh water?


Well, since the sim instructors at Altus all flew the A model, the young guys hear about it.

All.

The.

Time.

How many Altus KC-135 sim Instructors does it take to change a lightbulb?

Five

One to change it and four to tell you “how we did it in back in the A model.”
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Well, since the sim instructors at Altus all flew the A model, the young guys hear about it.

All.

The.

Time.

How many Altus KC-135 sim Instructors does it take to change a lightbulb?

Five

One to change it and four to tell you “how we did it in back in the A model.”


Do the -46 guys tell R model stories?



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8 hours ago, SocialD said:

 

 

Time to send them back to the Guard so our MX guys can unfuck them again, then the AD can take them back.

I remember when we launched for our first flights into Afghanistan in Oct 2001 the Guard B-1s handled the load and active duty birds were spare parts. You know it's all about sortie count and flying hour program, I wonder if that had something to do about her firing. 

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26 minutes ago, Prosuper said:

I remember when we launched for our first flights into Afghanistan in Oct 2001 the Guard B-1s handled the load and active duty birds were spare parts. You know it's all about sortie count and flying hour program, I wonder if that had something to do about her firing. 

She was fired from Dyess. The problem was found on an Ellsworth jet. So I doubt that was it. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
2 minutes ago, isuguy1234 said:

Surprised nobody has hit this one up yet on here...although if you comment, who knows what will happen?!?!  (big brother is always watching/listening ha)

https://thehill.com/policy/defense/553779-space-force-commander-removed-after-comments-on-podcast

It's posted in the Woke thread, but it is just as appropriate here... and the ACIP thread.

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On 4/23/2021 at 8:41 AM, SocialD said:

Time to send them back to the Guard so our MX guys can unfuck them again, then the AD can take them back.

That would be about right for Air Force logic.  There are only a handful of us left that still remember/flew/maintained B-1s.

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21 hours ago, SurelySerious said:

Sounds like you’re still in an AD Bone squadron.

As Disco used to say, that’s sad but funny, like a clown on fire.

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  • 5 months later...

Whoops

https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2021/11/09/awacs-ops-group-commander-at-tinker-fired-after-investigation/

Col. Gary Donovan, commander of Tinker Air Force Base’s 552nd Operations Group in Oklahoma, was removed from his post Monday following an investigation that found he skirted safety protocols and fostered an unhealthy workplace culture, a spokesman confirmed Tuesday.

Col. Wayne Frost, the 552nd Air Control Wing’s vice commander, has taken over as ops group boss. Donovan was moved to “do other responsibilities on the installation,” Master Sgt. Andrew Satran, a 15th Air Force spokesman, said Tuesday.

The Air Force declined to discuss other punitive measures that Donovan may face.

“We need the men and women of the 552nd Operations Group to foster a culture of dignity and respect. This means living by core values every day and empowering subordinate leaders to promote these values through teaching, coaching and mentorship,” Maj. Gen. Michael Koscheski, 15th Air Force commander, said in an emailed statement. “We need all airmen to embrace this mindset.”

Koscheski relieved Donovan from command four months after he tried to send E-3 Airborne Warning and Control System aircrews on a July training exercise they felt was unsafe.

Airmen pushed back, cancelling the sorties, and took to social media to complain about Donovan’s conduct. Multiple safety probes and an investigation into Donovan ensued, while 552nd Air Control Wing leadership maintained it was a matter of miscommunication.

The main inquiry, which was launched by Koscheski over the summer and released its findings at the end of October, substantiated claims that Donovan failed to “promote a culture of safety by failing to adhere to operational risk management standards … and local [risk management] procedures,” according to a summary obtained by Air Force Times.

It also validated that Donovan did not “effectively lead his airmen” and failed to create a “healthy command climate which fosters good order and discipline, teamwork, cohesion and trust.”

Satran declined to provide a copy of the investigation report without a Freedom of Information Act request.

The Air Force whittled down the three safety probes to one, which is still in the works, an Air Force Safety Center spokesman said Tuesday. But earlier paperwork, obtained by Air Force Times through a FOIA request, illustrates similar concerns that have existed for years.

One incident noted through the Airman Safety Action Program — an initiative that lets airmen anonymously self-report safety issues they encounter — argued that 552nd ACW “management believes, on an ingrained and systemic level, that as long as anyone meets the intent of crew rest, they can fly.”

“Members are subtly coerced into flying a local training sortie regardless of experience level and without the proper crew rest considerations,” the Jan. 10, 2018, report said.

Another submission from March 30, 2020, said a training sortie was replanned at the last minute to steer clear of thunderstorms in the area, but the changes weren’t properly relayed to the aircrews. Bad weather moved in sooner than expected, and the airmen scrambled to land amid a lightning warning.

The investigator added that airmen were frustrated that their debriefing that day didn’t discuss any of the problems that arose in planning and flying the sortie.

“A lot of focus on flight safety and leadership has gone by the wayside,” said one air battle manager who spoke to Air Force Times on condition of anonymity earlier this year.

“In my mind, there’s no way for the 552 to be successful without removing the OG from command.”

Edited by MDDieselPilot
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20 minutes ago, MDDieselPilot said:

Whoops

https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2021/11/09/awacs-ops-group-commander-at-tinker-fired-after-investigation/

Col. Gary Donovan, commander of Tinker Air Force Base’s 552nd Operations Group in Oklahoma, was removed from his post Monday following an investigation that found he skirted safety protocols and fostered an unhealthy workplace culture, a spokesman confirmed Tuesday.

Col. Wayne Frost, the 552nd Air Control Wing’s vice commander, has taken over as ops group boss. Donovan was moved to “do other responsibilities on the installation,” Master Sgt. Andrew Satran, a 15th Air Force spokesman, said Tuesday.

The Air Force declined to discuss other punitive measures that Donovan may face.

“We need the men and women of the 552nd Operations Group to foster a culture of dignity and respect. This means living by core values every day and empowering subordinate leaders to promote these values through teaching, coaching and mentorship,” Maj. Gen. Michael Koscheski, 15th Air Force commander, said in an emailed statement. “We need all airmen to embrace this mindset.”

Koscheski relieved Donovan from command four months after he tried to send E-3 Airborne Warning and Control System aircrews on a July training exercise they felt was unsafe.

Airmen pushed back, cancelling the sorties, and took to social media to complain about Donovan’s conduct. Multiple safety probes and an investigation into Donovan ensued, while 552nd Air Control Wing leadership maintained it was a matter of miscommunication.

The main inquiry, which was launched by Koscheski over the summer and released its findings at the end of October, substantiated claims that Donovan failed to “promote a culture of safety by failing to adhere to operational risk management standards … and local [risk management] procedures,” according to a summary obtained by Air Force Times.

It also validated that Donovan did not “effectively lead his airmen” and failed to create a “healthy command climate which fosters good order and discipline, teamwork, cohesion and trust.”

Satran declined to provide a copy of the investigation report without a Freedom of Information Act request.

The Air Force whittled down the three safety probes to one, which is still in the works, an Air Force Safety Center spokesman said Tuesday. But earlier paperwork, obtained by Air Force Times through a FOIA request, illustrates similar concerns that have existed for years.

One incident noted through the Airman Safety Action Program — an initiative that lets airmen anonymously self-report safety issues they encounter — argued that 552nd ACW “management believes, on an ingrained and systemic level, that as long as anyone meets the intent of crew rest, they can fly.”

“Members are subtly coerced into flying a local training sortie regardless of experience level and without the proper crew rest considerations,” the Jan. 10, 2018, report said.

Another submission from March 30, 2020, said a training sortie was replanned at the last minute to steer clear of thunderstorms in the area, but the changes weren’t properly relayed to the aircrews. Bad weather moved in sooner than expected, and the airmen scrambled to land amid a lightning warning.

The investigator added that airmen were frustrated that their debriefing that day didn’t discuss any of the problems that arose in planning and flying the sortie.

“A lot of focus on flight safety and leadership has gone by the wayside,” said one air battle manager who spoke to Air Force Times on condition of anonymity earlier this year.

“In my mind, there’s no way for the 552 to be successful without removing the OG from command.”

The 552 has such a historic reputation for being a toxic command climate. Ive never heard anyone speak highly about the 552 or Tinker AFB in 14 years. 

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Not the only one yesterday:

https://apnews.com/article/wisconsin-b546a8687a52522d8be3a312b2c57784

Volk Field commander relieved of duties after investigation
CAMP DOUGLAS, Wis. (AP) — There has been a change of command at the Volk Field Air National Guard Base in Wisconsin.
Col. Leslie Zyzda-Martin has been relieved of her duties as commander of Volk Field at Camp Douglas.


The National Guard said in a statement that Brig. Gen. David W. May ended Zyzda-Martin’s command Monday due to “lost confidence in her ability to lead.”

“This is a very difficult decision, but it is the right thing to do in the best interest of Volk Field,” May said. “The men and women that make up Volk Field are extraordinary at what they do. It is my obligation to ensure they have the type of leadership that will meet the unique needs and challenges of our state and federal missions.”

The guard’s statement said the decision was made following investigations that revealed issues concerning command climate and alleged misconduct. Additional investigations are ongoing....

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