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That Cyber Thread


17D_guy

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There needs to be one unified cybersecurity framework that federal entities use (which they’re required to currently), not the multiple ones that are fielded now which don’t fully integrate with each other. Generals with wings will “get cyber” once adversaries have found a way to shut down largely computerized modern aircraft and possibly endangering crew members.

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  • 4 months later...
28 minutes ago, ViperMan said:

Last week oil, this week beef.

First, WTF is going on?

Second, if I'm forced to eat soy products, that's my line for going kinetic.

But our elections…totally secure, just like our border.

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  • 4 months later...

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2021/10/12/pentagon-official-says-he-resigned-because-us-cybersecurity-no-match-china.html

 

 

I think what I find most interesting in his post is calling out Google. Why did we let Google seize the narrative on that? At the end of the day, google caved to 12 employees that through a hissy fit that Google wanted to work with the USAF to reduce civilian casualties in Drone Strikes. 

Edited by FLEA
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3 hours ago, FLEA said:

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2021/10/12/pentagon-official-says-he-resigned-because-us-cybersecurity-no-match-china.html

 

 

I think what I find most interesting in his post is calling out Google. Why did we let Google seize the narrative on that? At the end of the day, google caved to 12 employees that through a hissy fit that Google wanted to work with the USAF to reduce civilian casualties in Drone Strikes. 

Some very damning statements and interesting to hear he thinks we have already lost.  Part of me hopes his is falling on his sword to get the attention the issues deserves (he is testifying before Congress next week), part of me is terrified he is right.  When...not if...China goes for Taiwan the American public likely won't know, we will be too bust trying to figure out why the lights are out, the water is out, the internet is out, the traffic lights are out.  It will be ugly.

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1 hour ago, ClearedHot said:

Some very damning statements and interesting to hear he thinks we have already lost.  Part of me hopes his is falling on his sword to get the attention the issues deserves (he is testifying before Congress next week), part of me is terrified he is right.  When...not if...China goes for Taiwan the American public likely won't know, we will be too bust trying to figure out why the lights are out, the water is out, the internet is out, the traffic lights are out.  It will be ugly.

He’s right. The DoD has not figured out cybersecurity, because to do so requires them to spend a lot money. Those go towards boats, jets, and weapons, not cybersecurity architecture or training. Sorry, an A1C or Lt with a Sec+ cert isn’t going to be a SME in cybersecurity architecture. No one will care until it directly impacts their life, then they’ll really start to care. Unfortunately, it may be too late by then.

Edited by Sua Sponte
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Some very damning statements and interesting to hear he thinks we have already lost.  Part of me hopes his is falling on his sword to get the attention the issues deserves (he is testifying before Congress next week), part of me is terrified he is right.  When...not if...China goes for Taiwan the American public likely won't know, we will be too bust trying to figure out why the lights are out, the water is out, the internet is out, the traffic lights are out.  It will be ugly.

Could we fight a war without PowerPoint and email? Only half joking...
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47 minutes ago, jazzdude said:


 


Could we fight a war without PowerPoint and email? Only half joking...

Thankfully, because of the determination of the weapons school to continue to teach white board briefing I believe we are ok without PowerPoint. No email though? I think we are fucked....

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Nicolas Challian was appointed as the first ever "Chief Software Officer" of the Air Force in August 2018, and it sounds like he put in a good fight over the past three years.

The Military.com article highlights Chaillan's concerns over Cybersecurity, but his letter posted to Linkedin is much more wide-ranging.  He spends some time highlighting his team's accomplishments during his tenure (which seems like they had many).  However, he has scathing criticism of how the DoD defines, develops, and fields software of all kinds.  It's a lengthy letter, but his criticisms seem to revolve around the following items (none of which are unexpected to anyone who's spent any time at all around the DoD):

  • DoD not funding his group properly, to the point that his billet and office had no dedicated funding, and he was forced to spend an inordinate amount of time chasing funding to do his job.  The figures he quotes seem reasonable - sounds like he was asking for $10's of millions, not $100's of millions.
  • DoD policies not being in line with modern software development.  Putting uniformed officers in charge of software development programs when they don't have the background/knowledge.  As he stated: "The Department of Defense, overall, needs to stop staffing Enterprise I.T. teams as if I.T. is not a highly technical skill and expertise.  We would not put a pilot in the cockpit without extensive flight training; why would we expect someone with no IT experience to be close to successful?"
  • Overall bureaucratic inertia, silos, and resistance to change.

The story of Kessel Run seems to be a bright spot in DoD software acquisition and development.  The Air Force had spent years and hundreds of millions funding the normal primes (Lockheed, Northrop, etc) to develop upgraded AOC software, with not much to show for it.  The Kessel Run group was able to succeed in a matter of months after spending tens of millions.  Kessel Run referring to the smuggling route in Star Wars, since the group figured they'd run into so much opposition within DoD that they'd almost have to "smuggle" their software in.

Ultimately, the DoD spends a big chunk of money on software development with a lot of companies (Lockheed, Boeing, Northrop, etc).  And the entire enterprise is biased against faster/better/cheaper.  I'm personally out of my realm on a lot of this stuff, but it seems to be the same age-old struggle.  We'll drag our feet on changing our ways until we get our ass kicked by someone.  Then, after we're done licking our wounds, change will come fast and furious.

Interested to hear from @17D_guy ,@Chuck17 or anyone else who's been closer to the software enterprise.

Edited by Blue
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Could we fight a war without PowerPoint and email? Only half joking...

That’s the fundamental misunderstanding people have with the whole Cyber war will be part of a multi domain conflict…

No Cyber warfare will be the new Nuclear 1st Strike, only it won’t allow you a follow up with any form of response.

All the idiots practicing war without computers using wet erase markers, plastic sheet overlays, and paper maps… None of those capabilities are actually going to be allowed, because you won’t even be able to issue the OP Order that brings forces to theatre. We will have things like the “7.2 miles of Combat Power” Fort Hood likes to brag about sitting in those same motor pools, because you can’t even get an email to coordinate the train to take them to port, much less put them in theatre and support them.

We need to realize Cyber isn’t going to be some arrow in your quiver to shoot, as much as it going to be your ability to protect your ability to actually do anything in whatever part of the world somebody chooses to then take advantage of our paralysis and conduct follow on actions.


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How the hell did we ever plan the Normandy invasion with slide rules, butcher block paper, and teletypes?  Granted it was years in planning but still.  So many books on generals/admirals but what I am really curious about is how their staffs operated.  Despite all of our technology we seemed to be less competent at planning at the operational and strategic levels than we were in WW2 (with most of the officer corps being non-career types even).  

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I'd imagine it was a lot more manpower/personnel intensive. And the ability to compile and synthesize information was probably more limited, which affects the quality of decisions made by commanders.

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I'd imagine it was a lot more manpower/personnel intensive. And the ability to compile and synthesize information was probably more limited, which affects the quality of decisions made by commanders.

Even desert storm was acetate and dot matrix printers…

Talk to the old guys running your Sims that lived it. The Navy guy I know was talking about having a dedicated flight every day whose sole job was to fly down and pick up the print version of the ATO/ACO. So here you are in a campaign where we are running sorties with everything available.. and you have available combat power acting as a taxi for what can know be accomplished with an email.

Yes they did it, but it’s not because we were just so good at War…it’s because the Iraqis were terrible at it.


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