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Advanced Instrument School (AIS)

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Dec 2012 update:

Metro Tech will do the mil comp. testing:

It's about a mile north of the FAA center (where AIS is), on the corner of SW 59th and MacArthur/Regina. Look for DC3 static display.

OKLAHOMA CITY

Lasergrade Computer Testing

Metro Tech Aviation Career Center

5600 N MacArthur Blvd Oklahoma City, OK 73179

405-605-5500

Call first to schedule, and ask what paperwork you'll need to bring.

Is it free like Tinker's education office was?

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Is it free like Tinker's education office was?

Sorry, no it's not. I think it's still $150. Worth every penny, IMHBAO.

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AIS no longer has the end of course presentation.

Also, they've added a one hour brief on UAS Systems! This former C-5 then RQ-4 guy talks about how unmanned is so much smarter and w/e. He did well at calming folks down, but the atmosphere was openly hostile. He called us "legacy thinkers."

Then, he pulls out his personal UAS! It was a thousand bucks and had 4 rotor blades with a camera in the middle. He proceeds to take it off and crash into the first row of student desks!

There weren't even any SU-27's around...Guess it "lost link."

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FYI... I just called Tinker's Education Office. They no longer administer FAA tests ( I was asking him about the CFI equivalency). The guy said they haven't done FAA testing in about 6 months.

I just did my ATP written exam at AIS a couple weeks ago. It was free and easy. They also do the comp test for free. Not sure about the CFI.

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He called us "legacy thinkers."

He's right of course. Drones are more economical and they don't place a pilots life at risk. However, removing the danger from combat aviation kinda sucks the fun out of it. A Prius is safe and economical, but I won't drive one. I'm sure Grand Theft Auto is fun, but I'd rather run my M3 any day. Manned combat aviation is less than 100 years old and probably won't make 200. This will be an exclusive club. Not quite the same as dudes that have walked on the moon, but there have been soldiers and sailers for thousands of years.

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AIS no longer has the end of course presentation.

Also, they've added a one hour brief on UAS Systems! This former C-5 then RQ-4 guy talks about how unmanned is so much smarter and w/e. He did well at calming folks down, but the atmosphere was openly hostile. He called us "legacy thinkers."

Then, he pulls out his personal UAS! It was a thousand bucks and had 4 rotor blades with a camera in the middle. He proceeds to take it off and crash into the first row of student desks!

There weren't even any SU-27's around...Guess it "lost link."

If this is what they're teaching at AIS now (and I only graduated two years ago) than the AF has completely lost sight of the intent of this course.

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AIS is a full FAA testing center. They can administer any FAA exam.

Hey GW, feel free to call AIS and discuss with them what the intent of the course should be. AIS is for pilots by pilots and its constantly evolving and is always welcome to constructive feedback to make it better.

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thread bump

Any Army aviators lurking who can provide any gouge on what the Army teaches holding entry and HOW it's taught?  I already have my hands on the Navy Instrument FTI.  Trying to see what the other services teach for the AIM method of entry.  The Navy way is the relationship between aircraft heading and the reciprocal of the inbound course and gang signs, curious if the Army teaches it that way too.

holds%207%20Pod%20method.gif

Reason - AIS is saying the 70º method is being dropped from the next version of the 11-217. 

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nunya, I went to AIS in 2011.  Was quite bored...I like the mac daddy of approach lighting systems!  I'm building a working model just like they have at AIS to incorporate into my IRC, in fact.

Back on a serious note...that FM doesn't explain HOW to figure out which sector you are in to determine your holding entry (unless I missed it somewhere).  That's what I really need.

Skyking, so that's how you'd teach a brand new student at IQT?  I don't need snark - I know how to figure it out, using my tried and true gang signs, I want to know how others have instructed it to figure out the best way to present it to the students.  Thanks for playing.

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I was taught to use the opposite hand with fingers closed and palm out to approximate the AIM method.

For example if I was going to be entering a standard holding pattern, I'd hold my left hand to the HSI, with fingers closed and thumb at it's open position. If the reciprocal of the inbound leg is below the thumb line it's a direct entry, between the pointer and the thumb-teardrop, pointer around the horn to the thumb line-parallel.

It's complicated to explain but easy to demonstrate when you hold it up to the HSI drawings you have linked. It'll get within the "conveniently aligned" WAG satisfying the 11-217.

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I was taught to use the opposite hand with fingers closed and palm out to approximate the AIM method.

For example if I was going to be entering a standard holding pattern, I'd hold my left hand to the HSI, with fingers closed and thumb at it's open position. If the reciprocal of the inbound leg is below the thumb line it's a direct entry, between the pointer and the thumb-teardrop, pointer around the horn to the thumb line-parallel.

It's complicated to explain but easy to demonstrate when you hold it up to the HSI drawings you have linked. It'll get within the "conveniently aligned" WAG satisfying the 11-217.

Thanks Breckey.  I'm trying to figure out if all the services who currently teach the AIM method teach it the same way.  The way you describe is how I learned it via the USN at Whiting Field.  Since USMC and USCG training is also conducted by the USN, that only leaves the Army. 

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The Army?  I was sitting SOF at Shaw one day, 0/0 due to fog.  Army PAT calls me up on the ground and asks me what HIS takeoff minimums were, geniuses.

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