Jump to content
HU&W

Leaving the Air Force for Something Other than the Airlines

Recommended Posts

16 hours ago, MilitaryToFinance said:

The Reserves must be getting desperate for folks. I got a call today from a Lt. Col. asking me how my transition to civilian life was going and offering that the Reserves are hiring if the transition is harder than expected. I told him that my transition went great when I separated in February 2013. Waiting over 5 years to give the sales pitch for coming back to the AF was probably a little too long.

How how quickly we forget...

At least do a USAFA liaison job. The airlines will tank again, and your life will be much easier if you can go fly something versus selling insurance and waiting for that call back.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, ayz33 said:

Advise when ready to copy full route clearance

I have the aircraft, Co you have the radios....

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/8/2018 at 11:24 PM, ayz33 said:

Advise when ready to copy full route clearance

--Do you have coords for that?  I don't have any of those points in my system.  Also, unable for gas.  

--Sigh, cleared direct...

 

23 hours ago, skibum said:

How how quickly we forget...

At least do a USAFA liaison job. The airlines will tank again, and your life will be much easier if you can go fly something versus selling insurance and waiting for that call back.

I may be off on this, but I don't think MTF is an airline guy.  Though he may still have to "sell insurance" if the economy tanks.  

Edited by SocialD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/9/2018 at 10:32 AM, skibum said:

How how quickly we forget...

At least do a USAFA liaison job. The airlines will tank again, and your life will be much easier if you can go fly something versus selling insurance and waiting for that call back.

 

On 6/10/2018 at 10:27 AM, SocialD said:

I may be off on this, but I don't think MTF is an airline guy.  Though he may still have to "sell insurance" if the economy tanks.  

Yes, I always assumed my username was a not particularly subtle clue as to my post-AF career path. My industry is prone to booms and busts as well but I don't see any scenario where I end up back in blue at this point. I just thought it was odd to get a call in June 2018 after I got out in early 2013.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone used any recruiters/head hunters for transitioning to something other than flying? My father talks about how many job interviews these kind of companies got him and fellow officers leaving the military back in the day.

Seems like it would be easier to find opportunities that might be more aligned with what you want to do vs randomly shooting resumes out to companies. 

Edited by Kenny Powers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Kenny Powers said:

Has anyone used any recruiters/head hunters for transitioning to something other than flying?

The vast majority of recruiters I've worked with on the civilian side have been colossal wastes of time. However, if you find a good one they are worth the pain & time you put in to finding them. The good ones have strong relationships with hiring managers within companies and can easily put you on top of the piles of resumes. That's how I got my current position. The flip side is that they make money by putting you in a position, so sometimes they're pushing for the easiest/quickest way to do that. I've seen recruiters try to pressure people into lateral moves for less money or into bad companies/positions.

In my experience, finding a good recruiter is almost as much work as landing a good job but can be worth it. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/13/2018 at 2:41 AM, Kenny Powers said:

Has anyone used any recruiters/head hunters for transitioning to something other than flying? My father talks about how many job interviews these kind of companies got him and fellow officers leaving the military back in the day.

Seems like it would be easier to find opportunities that might be more aligned with what you want to do vs randomly shooting resumes out to companies. 

From my experience most of the opportunities come from networking.  I was contacted by several recruiters when I retired but they were conducting confidential retained searches.  One led to a series of interviews for a very high-level position that I ultimately decided against.  The job market is hot right now and I would not work with a recruiter who wants to charge you anything.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, ClearedHot said:

From my experience most of the opportunities come from networking. 

I never used a recruiter, but wouldn't rule it out.  

As with CH, building relationships was the key to any opportunities I've had.  In my case, I kept those relationships alive because I liked the people I met... it wasn't to "find a job".  But the job offers that came my way were a unintended consequence of those friendships. 

If you're 12 months from retiring, and expect to start networking now to find a great opportunity, it will be very difficult, in my opinion.    Many of the opportunities I've had were developed over relationships that went back many years.  

 

Edited by HuggyU2
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not retiring, just considering flying part time for the Guard and doing something other than the airlines.

This has probably been covered but, do things like LinkedIn help with networking? Are there other tools? Or has this all been from people you guys have met over your career? That's the thing about the guard, with the exception of TDY, you see the same people for 20 years haha.

For example, if I wanted to work for a company like Lockheed/Boeing/Raytheon, there has to be more to it than searching their job postings hoping to find a match, right?

Edited by Kenny Powers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kenny,

I'll give you my opinion on the matter, but I hope others post theirs, as there are certainly many, many other viewpoints.  

The U-2 guys that have gone in to the aerospace sector were pretty well networked, for the most part.  While some of that was through the U-2 Brotherhood, much of it was also because they built relationships with various the people from those companies while they were on active duty.  They would go TDY to conferences, site visits, etc... and made the effort to  stay with the entire group, rather than bolt and do the "aircrew only" bar scene once the meetings ended.  For example, one friend of mine became a trusted agent and social friend to a couple of Flag Officers, an Under Secretary,  and and some other heavy hitters you would know from recent news events.  I have very little first hand knowledge, but I assume the same opportunities exist within your community.  

LinkedIn:  I built a profile years ago, but have never used it.  I'm sure there are success stories out there, but the positions I were offered were not something that I could imagine happening on LinkedIn.  

The Executive Director position I had from 2014-2016 was purely a result of meeting some CEO's and entrepreneurs at Oshkosh, and spending many hours engaged with them on a personal level for a couple of years.  

One interesting "networking" thing that happened was at Oshkosh in 2003 or '04.  Two of us flew a Beale T-38 there for static.  Met and spent quality time with some people from Virgin.  A couple of nights later, I'm at a small, private house party in Oshkosh with about 30 people. It wasn't until we walked out to the pool area that we realized Richard Branson was hosting the party.  Too bad I had no aspirations to move to the UK or Mojave.  

In summary, Kenny, I don't think the positions you would want will easily materialize through job postings.  But that's just my opinion, since I have no direct experience with social media job hunting.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LinkedIn offers military and veteran's free Premium access, which is normally $60 a month, for free. It's good for a year. Starting next month, they're offering it to military spouses for free to help network and make it easier to find jobs due to PCS's.

https://linkedinforgood.linkedin.com/programs/veterans/premiumform

Edited by Azimuth
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Azimuth said:

LinkedIn offers military and veteran's free Premium access, which is normally $60 a month, for free. It's good for a year. Starting next month, they're offering it to military spouses for free to help network and make it easier to find jobs due to PCS's.

https://linkedinforgood.linkedin.com/programs/veterans/premiumform

Thats pretty good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Azimuth said:

LinkedIn offers military and veteran's free Premium access, which is normally $60 a month, for free. It's good for a year. Starting next month, they're offering it to military spouses for free to help network and make it easier to find jobs due to PCS's.

https://linkedinforgood.linkedin.com/programs/veterans/premiumform

More importantly, I've heard of people using Linkedin as a dating site for professionals.  Anybody had any luck picking up hot business chicks on these sites?  

As an airline pilot, I think it's time to start looking for my first ex-wife. Bonus points if I can get alimony out of the deal.  

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Buddy Spike said:

More importantly, I've heard of people using Linkedin as a dating site for professionals.  Anybody had any luck picking up hot business chicks on these sites?  

As an airline pilot, I think it's time to start looking for my first ex-wife. Bonus points if I can get alimony out of the deal.  

Might as well.  You have chicks out there trying to use Tinder as a legit dating site!  "...if you're just looking to hook up, swipe left!"  Go to match if you're not down!   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I posted up in another thread, so sorry to beat the same drum, but being a firefighter (or cop) is another option if you don’t want airlines or an office job. A lot of larger-city options might be off the table if you did 20+ military due to age restrictions (36 is a cap in a lot of cities; but many smaller cities don’t have age caps), but it’s worth looking into.

Most cities give points to veterans, let you buy back 3 years military time, are very conducive to Reserves/ANG if you still want to fly, may provide another pension, and are seemingly (only say that because I don’t have military experience...yet) similar mentalities/excitement levels to military service. 

There are 12 other people all day, every day in my firehouse, with nearly 60 assigned to the house in total. Lots of different personalities to keep things interesting. We have each others’ backs, are close-knit and social (both at work and with our families), help each other through thick and thin, laugh a whole lot (at ourselves and one another), and get to do some pretty crazy/exciting things that change daily. 10-20% of guys are prior military service, too. 

I’ve not flown a military jet (yet), but driving a 70,000lb fire truck through traffic, pulling up to a building with fire blowing out the window, and heading in when everyone else is heading out is pretty damn exciting. You’re forcing open doors and heading into an environment that’s hot and you can’t see your hand in front of your face to look for victims, or pushing a hoseline that’ll unleash 180-250 gallons of water a minute and nearly send you flying backwards.

You will save a cat. Likely many cats over a career. I’ve heard of guys rescuing a cop, who got stuck in a tree trying to save a cat. In front of a playground full of school children...

You’ll see the best and worst; often times within a few hours of one another. You’ll laugh pretty damn hard. You’ll go home feeling like you made a difference, even if it’s just a small one like opening up an arthritic old lady’s cat food can or making sure the local drunk is still breathing when passed out after his/her latest bender. 

It’s not a perfect job always, but it sure isn’t a bad one. Especially if you already have the mindset, as I’d imagine many pilots/military members do. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×