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AETC Issues Official COVID-19 Mission Essential Training Determination, Authorizes Travel

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Image may contain: 1 person, possible text that says 'Due to the Coronavirus the the US Air Force is now doing Boot Camp from home via the internet.'

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Posted (edited)

Well it seems the Army is taking CORVID-19 serious, moving in a logical direction, and starting to ramp their response up a wee bit.

- "Army Shutters Recruiting Stations as 6 Recruits Show COVID-19 Symptoms at Basic Training :"

"We have reduced the numbers; we are running about 50 percent," McConville said. "We just ran a test of that."

"The Army typically sends about 1,200 recruits per week to Basic Combat Training, TRADOC spokesman Col. Richard McNorton told Military.com, adding that the reduction would mean that about 600 recruits per week are being sent to initial entry training."

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/03/20/army-shutters-recruiting-stations-6-recruits-show-covid-19-symptoms-basic-training.html

- "Army Orders All Medical Units to Prepare for Possible Response to Virus Outbreak:"

 "The Army gave two combat support hospitals (CSH) -- one at Joint Base Lewis-McCord, Washington, and the other at Fort Campbell, Kentucky -- a "prepare to deploy order" as the U.S. government wrestles with how best to help communities if the spread of COVID-19 intensifies, Gen. James McConville told reporters at the Pentagon."

"He said the Army has also given a "warning order to all our Role 3 hospitals," facilities staffed and equipped to provide care to all categories of patients, to include resuscitation, initial wound surgery, specialty surgery and post-operative care."

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/03/20/army-orders-all-medical-units-prepare-possible-response-virus-outbreak.html

Edited by waveshaper

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Hence my statement that they would have to be restricted to the immediate training area.  The mini-mart and exchange would be off limits.  I went through field training at Lackland and the only contact I had with anyone outside the training staff, other trainees, or food service personnel, was while getting a haircut at the mini-mart.  Yes, I'm aware that the two training programs are different, but with some small policy changes and accommodations moved to the dorm area to serve the trainees in garrison, it would be possible.  
I'm not advocating for it, but I also wouldn't consider an attempt to make it work a public health hazard.  My guess is that it would prove infeasible as once infection occurred within the system training would likely have to stop.  But very few of the 18yr old trainees would end up at Reid.  They'd just transfer to a separate quarantine dorm for rest.
I'm also not sure people have a grasp of how long this process is going to take if the efforts to slow it work.  Forgoing a few BMT classes is one thing, but can the AF absorb missing 6-12 months (or more) of newly minted Airmen?  They might have no choice but to try and make it work.
The Navy cancelled months is basic training classes due to sequestration and the manning still hasn't completely recovered.

It's all risk vs reward. Yes, having classes probably will add to the spread. But if precautions are taken to contain the virus within the training classes where it pops up, they probably see that as a worthwhile risk to take. AETC guidance didn't come out particularly quickly, so I'm willing to bet someone ran the numbers to figure out the downstream effects of cancelling training courses and that led to the decision to move forward.

If there's an outbreak at this next OTS class or make issues at BMT, the results of that analysis might change, but as of now, I guess they think it's worth the risk.

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On 3/22/2020 at 10:47 AM, M2 said:

Under HPCON C, our critical missions will continue (medical, cyber, training, flying, etc). 

Can someone tell me what that is? Do they mean the Comm squadron, because that's not fucking "cyber."

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27 minutes ago, 17D_guy said:

Can someone tell me what that is? Do they mean the Comm squadron, because that's not fucking "cyber."

I think this is definitely a rhetorical because you know we know that you always say higher ups don't understand cyber... but you know leadership can't articulate cyber.

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14 hours ago, SurelySerious said:

I think this is definitely a rhetorical because you know we know that you always say higher ups don't understand cyber... but you know leadership can't articulate cyber.

I can't like your post.  So here - :beer:

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Posted (edited)

Comm or cyber, they all are responsible for not fixing this from the beginning. Now it’s tougher as I am older with these “cheaters” (reading glasses) on. Not all keyboards, but no one put a work order change to the manufacturer. Daaaang it.

54F09134-D21B-41AF-85ED-36682800C805.png

Edited by AirGuardianC141747

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36 minutes ago, uhhello said:

Confirmed case at AF basic training

Yep.

https://www.kens5.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/air-force-trainee-tests-positive-for-covid-19-at-jbsa-is-currently-isolated-and-receiving-treatment/273-25698c14-b61a-4aa1-8565-332f36469b11

The trainee was one of 600 that arrived on 18 March. 
 The affected individual and 40 of his/her closest friends have been quarantined away from BMTS.

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9 hours ago, M2 said:

From the same article...

""We take preparing for worst-case scenarios seriously, and that planning has paid off," Lt. Gen. Brad Webb is quoted as saying in the release. "

🤔🤔🤔  hmmm....

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Bigger brains enlighten me please.  Why would we not hit pause on incoming members/training pipelines and instead put a stop loss in place?  The training pipeline introduces a huge number of challenges in facing this virus whether that be dorms, classrooms, chow halls, transportation etc.  I have one guy in training at Little Rock right now.  When he graduates he will not be running around our squadron.  He will be virtually in-processing and staying home until this passes.  On the other side, folks that were planning on leaving the military are not going to find a healthy job market for the next few months, have experience in their jobs and are at least somewhat established in their communities allowing them to establish better distancing from others.  

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6 minutes ago, lloyd christmas said:

Bigger brains enlighten me please.  Why would we not hit pause on incoming members/training pipelines and instead put a stop loss in place? ...On the other side, folks that were planning on leaving the military are not going to find a healthy job market for the next few months, have experience in their jobs and are at least somewhat established in their communities allowing them to establish better distancing from others.  

This impacts me directly.  I'm slated to retire 1 Aug, with terminal starting late May.  I fully expect it to happen and think it's probably the right call if we're "maintaining mission readiness."  I'll always love this country, and I'll be grateful to the AF for my opportunities...even if she's a fickle bitch quite often.

That being said...if I don't get moved to a job where I can legit telework 90% of the time and not be hassled by the Bob's asking me to line up shit on a ppt better I'm going to start having "discipline issues."

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3 hours ago, lloyd christmas said:

Bigger brains enlighten me please.  Why would we not hit pause on incoming members/training pipelines and instead put a stop loss in place?  The training pipeline introduces a huge number of challenges in facing this virus whether that be dorms, classrooms, chow halls, transportation etc.  I have one guy in training at Little Rock right now.  When he graduates he will not be running around our squadron.  He will be virtually in-processing and staying home until this passes.  On the other side, folks that were planning on leaving the military are not going to find a healthy job market for the next few months, have experience in their jobs and are at least somewhat established in their communities allowing them to establish better distancing from others.  

Stop it! Your common sense isn’t allowed here! 

break break

As to a stop loss...the AF doesn’t need to currently. This China virus has done the trick for them, at least for now. 

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40 minutes ago, WheelsOff said:

As to a stop loss...the AF doesn’t need to currently. This China virus has done the trick for them, at least for now. 

Ah, it all makes sense now.  Pilot shortage problem solved!

image.thumb.png.c52f72076f1f4e0f174f2aef9b24f697.png

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1 hour ago, Bender said:

 

Hey, makes sense. after all the Gov of that place emphatically said they'll never be China. 🤷‍♂️

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Observe, adapt, overcome! 

 60 Best GUNNY HIGHWAY images | Clint eastwood, Military humor ...

Quote

Air Force BMT adjusts schedules, locations to sustain mission readiness
 

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-LACKLAND, Texas –  As part of an ongoing contingency response to COVID-19, and with restriction of movement protocols for new recruits already in place at U.S. Air Force basic military training, the service has implemented a revised approach to how recruits enter the training pipeline here.

In order to ensure the health and safety of trainees and instructors and to preserve dorm capacity, new recruits will be brought in based on a four-week repeating cycle that includes stringent restricted movement guidelines, dedicated time for deep cleaning between rotations, resetting the instructor cadre and the testing of an alternate BMT location at Keesler AFB, Miss.

Under the phased plan, normal student loads of 650 to 800 students will report for basic military training during the first two weeks and immediately enter into the 14-day restriction of movement protocol. Trainees will  prepare for full-scale training and complete administrative tasks and limited training objectives, while practicing social distancing and small group contact during the 14 days.

The first week of the initial iteration of the plan began March 17 when 653 recruits reported to basic military training.  The next arrival of trainees, planned for March 31, will be rescheduled.  From that point onward, approximately 460 trainees will arrive at BMT each week, while implementing COVID-19 mitigation measures.  Precautions include deep-cleaning dormitories, dining facilities and other BMT infrastructure, in line with CDC guidance, as well as will help reset the military training instructor cadre.

Plans are also underway to send 60 trainees to a Keesler AFB-based detachment under the direction of the 737th Training Group to demonstrate proof of concept to generate the force at multiple training locations during contingencies. 

“We are deliberately developing options to disperse the delivery of BMT during contingencies to  provide surge capacity and introduce agility into the training pipeline construct,” said Maj. Gen. Andrea Tullos, Second Air Force commander. “This will also help provide relief to the military training instructor staff and ease the strain on our BMT infrastructure.”

The contingency option is designed to be implemented along a 180-day surge timeline and is sustainable for longer periods, but is not intended to be an enduring construct with force structure implications, Tullos said.

Additionally, all BMT graduation events remain private and closed to the public, with Thursday graduation ceremonies being livestreamed on the USAF Basic Military Training Facebook page. 

“These changes are part of our operational mindset to fight through COVID-19 and mitigate force health risks,” Tullos said “We continue to carefully balance the need to deliver mission ready forces to our operational commanders with the force health protection measures we must responsibly take to preserve the welfare of our families and the extensive network of communities across our nation we call home.”

Located on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, Keesler AFB is home to the 81st Training Wing, who train, develop and inspire premier warfighters in training for over 160 career field specialty training courses in addition to eight operating locations in the continental United States.  The base also is home for the 2nd Air Force and the U.S. Air Force Reserve 403rd Wing.  Training more than 28,000 students annually, with an average daily student load of more than 2,700, the 81st TRW is a lead Joint Training Installation, instructing personnel from every military service branch including the U.S. Coast Guard.  The wing also trains civilian federal agency personnel.

 

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Observe, adapt, overcome! 
 2a153b45d6c1bc2f24ca62d9ca9fb833--clint-eastwood-legends.jpg
Air Force BMT adjusts schedules, locations to sustain mission readiness
 
JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-LACKLAND, Texas –  As part of an ongoing contingency response to COVID-19, and with restriction of movement protocols for new recruits already in place at U.S. Air Force basic military training, the service has implemented a revised approach to how recruits enter the training pipeline here.
In order to ensure the health and safety of trainees and instructors and to preserve dorm capacity, new recruits will be brought in based on a four-week repeating cycle that includes stringent restricted movement guidelines, dedicated time for deep cleaning between rotations, resetting the instructor cadre and the testing of an alternate BMT location at Keesler AFB, Miss.
Under the phased plan, normal student loads of 650 to 800 students will report for basic military training during the first two weeks and immediately enter into the 14-day restriction of movement protocol. Trainees will  prepare for full-scale training and complete administrative tasks and limited training objectives, while practicing social distancing and small group contact during the 14 days.
The first week of the initial iteration of the plan began March 17 when 653 recruits reported to basic military training.  The next arrival of trainees, planned for March 31, will be rescheduled.  From that point onward, approximately 460 trainees will arrive at BMT each week, while implementing COVID-19 mitigation measures.  Precautions include deep-cleaning dormitories, dining facilities and other BMT infrastructure, in line with CDC guidance, as well as will help reset the military training instructor cadre.
Plans are also underway to send 60 trainees to a Keesler AFB-based detachment under the direction of the 737th Training Group to demonstrate proof of concept to generate the force at multiple training locations during contingencies. 
“We are deliberately developing options to disperse the delivery of BMT during contingencies to  provide surge capacity and introduce agility into the training pipeline construct,” said Maj. Gen. Andrea Tullos, Second Air Force commander. “This will also help provide relief to the military training instructor staff and ease the strain on our BMT infrastructure.”
The contingency option is designed to be implemented along a 180-day surge timeline and is sustainable for longer periods, but is not intended to be an enduring construct with force structure implications, Tullos said.
Additionally, all BMT graduation events remain private and closed to the public, with Thursday graduation ceremonies being livestreamed on the USAF Basic Military Training Facebook page. 
“These changes are part of our operational mindset to fight through COVID-19 and mitigate force health risks,” Tullos said “We continue to carefully balance the need to deliver mission ready forces to our operational commanders with the force health protection measures we must responsibly take to preserve the welfare of our families and the extensive network of communities across our nation we call home.”
Located on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, Keesler AFB is home to the 81st Training Wing, who train, develop and inspire premier warfighters in training for over 160 career field specialty training courses in addition to eight operating locations in the continental United States.  The base also is home for the 2nd Air Force and the U.S. Air Force Reserve 403rd Wing.  Training more than 28,000 students annually, with an average daily student load of more than 2,700, the 81st TRW is a lead Joint Training Installation, instructing personnel from every military service branch including the U.S. Coast Guard.  The wing also trains civilian federal agency personnel.
 


Sweet article; clean up on aisle 69 please!

~Bendy

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Posted on Facebook...

Quote

19th AF commander Maj. Gen. Craig Wills shares his thoughts on the importance of keeping the flying mission going. This decision is in keeping with the Air Force’s three primary goals: taking care of its Airmen and their families, maintaining combat readiness and partnering with governmental agencies to support communities and our nation.

#Recap of the video's main takeaways:

1️⃣ Trust your leadership. “From Gen. Goldfein all the way down to your flight commander, folks are working really hard to do smart things to get after this.”
2️⃣ Take control of the things you can control. What does that mean? Be mindful of news intake. “Stay informed by all means but don’t let the negative aspects of this weigh you down.” Continue to follow the (CDC) guidance. If you still must report to work and are worried about coming back home to your families, consider first changing out of uniform, going straight to the shower and sanitizing everything you touch.
3️⃣ Take a breath. “There’s no question this is an amazing challenge we are dealing with, but we will get through this.” Remember that “calm is contagious. Whatever you do, take a breath, stay calm and we’ll get through this.”
4️⃣ Take care of yourself. This time presents a great opportunity to work on your fitness. “Get outside unless you’re in some kind of isolation … Get some fresh air. Get some exercise. Make sure when you come back, you’re fit.”
5️⃣ Take care of each other. The prospect of financial burdens and the threat of a global pandemic is enough to scare anybody “so let’s make sure we’re taking the time to connect with each other even if we’re connecting from six feet away or over FaceTime or Skype. Let’s look after each other and continue to take care of our wingmen.”

He concluded by expressing thanks to military members for their continued help and support. “You may not agree with everything I said or you may disagree with the reasons why we’re doing it, but I just want to tell you that you’re part of a special team. There is a reason that America trusts its Air Force … There’s a reason that people say thank you for your service. It’s because you’re the folks that said, 'when the nation calls, I’ll be there.' The nation expects a lot of us … We have an unbelievable opportunity to help lead our country through this and make sure that when we get through on the other side, America’s Air Force is just as strong … and we are able to defend this country and provide a better way of life for our kids and their kids and to continue to provide the opportunity for America to have a prosperous and excellent society.”

 

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5 hours ago, M2 said:

consider first changing out of uniform, going straight to the shower and sanitizing everything you touch.

Doesn’t everyone do this already?

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Doesn’t everyone do this already?

Yeah because I wash my 2 flight suits every other day...


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After reading that, I agree and disagree. I agree that the military should be abiding by the CDC recommendations and not instituting large gatherings of personnel. What I disagree with is that the military should just hide inside for a few weeks and let this thing blow over. 
 

I think this has really shown the micromanagement culture and lack of empowerment to subordinates. To me, this is the ultimate case of giving clear intent from the top down the chain and trusting those down the chain to carry it out. Hell, we could even profit from a crisis here and practice dislocated nodes and communication is a less than ideal environment.

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