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Promotion and PRF Information

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5 hours ago, Shazaam said:

There are DO jobs available if that is what you want. I wonder if this is a reason why we get slammed on promotion boards for not taking on other types of leadership jobs. Being an AC or MC is a leadership job. 

 

So you’re a DO of a non-flying TRS in AETC?

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4 hours ago, herkbier said:

And an FTU and a WPS?

At Dyess, we have one combat squadron and the FTU (two flying squadrons).  We do have the WPS, but I'm not a WIC grad.  We also have the Test squadron, but again, tough to get under the RMD because they're considered staff jobs.

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Article 32 officer hasn't even determined there is probable cause for a trial yet, Colorado Springs PD already determined that there was not, and we're plastering the guy's name all over the place?

Not relevant to topic, and prejudicial to someone that is innocent until proven guilty. Delete and move on.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Disco_Nav963 said:

Article 32 officer hasn't even determined there is probable cause for a trial yet, Colorado Springs PD already determined that there was not, and we're plastering the guy's name all over the place?

Not relevant to topic, and prejudicial to someone that is innocent until proven guilty. Delete and move on.

The phrase "accused of said allegations" must have totally escaped your vernacular? You know what accused means and I surely don't have to point out the definition of allegations either right. If you think you are correct, sue the writers of the articles from Military.com and AF Times in court and see how that turns out in front of a real judge. 

Tell AF Times, Military.com, and the countless other online sites to remove their articles. You're just preaching to the choir on your soapbox of righteousness.

Edited by Shazaam
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8 hours ago, Shazaam said:

Nobody is left in our year group. Needless to say, Maj Travis J. Burns is in our year group too. A special operations pilot at the Air Force Academy is accused of rape, rape of a child and three counts of sexual abuse of a child, the school said Thursday.

Not to derail, but damn.

Yeah, the result of no one in my year group has been the B-1 community picking people from younger year groups to set them up for school/staff.

Also, can't believe you're going to put a fellow officer in blast without so much as a source.  Jesus.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, pawnman said:

Yeah, the result of no one in my year group has been the B-1 community picking people from younger year groups to set them up for school/staff.

Also, can't believe you're going to put a fellow officer in blast without so much as a source.  Jesus.

I copied the allegations directly from the Military.com article in my Google feed. AF Times just posted their story today. The source was the USAFA who put him on blast as pointed out in the original post by "the school said Thursday." Didn't care to post the link yesterday, but since you asked:

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2019/05/19/special-operations-pilot-faces-charges-raping-child-under-12-years-old.html

https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2019/05/21/academy-major-accused-of-rape-molestation-faces-article-32-hearing/

AF Times “It must be emphasized that charges are merely accusations, and the accused is presumed innocent until proven guilty,” the release said."

Edited by Shazaam
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2 hours ago, ThreeHoler said:

The inevitable spiral is beginning!

Valid.  He’ll just come back with another user name after this plays out predictably.

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8 hours ago, ThreeHoler said:

The inevitable spiral is beginning!


Sent from my iPhone using Baseops Network mobile app

Honestly am surprised it took this long.  Seems like most people on here are ignoring the bizarre posting though.

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On 5/15/2019 at 12:32 PM, Danger41 said:

Down voted for 777 maintenance.

And I started this, btw. You can at least throw a couple percent my way.

Money sent. Check your zelle 

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14 minutes ago, BashiChuni said:

Money sent. Check your zelle 

Easiest 6 grand I ever made.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, DirkDiggler said:

Honestly am surprised it took this long.  Seems like most people on here are ignoring the bizarre posting though.

I’ve recently been educated on the ignore user function; I mean, why bother with obviously fabricated BS spam? 

 

And to think I could have been auto screening @nsplayr‘s dissertations all these years. 

Edited by SurelySerious
Words

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Some really solid points in this article, should be required reading for all FOGOs

Not Every Officer Wants to Be a General

https://www.wsj.com/articles/not-every-officer-wants-to-be-a-general-11558390890

Quote

Mr. Kane summed up the problem to Congress last year. The military is composed of volunteers who are dealt with more like conscripts, he said. Every young officer is treated as an aspiring general or admiral, and thus is pushed into an “ideal” set of jobs with rigid timing for promotion, without respect to competing priorities, like a wife’s job or kids who don’t want to go to a new high school every year.

Mr. Kane tells me he’s known of people who “will terminate their careers early because the Air Force or the Marines won’t tell them, ‘You know what? if you don’t want to become a general, and you just want to stay at whatever base it is for the next four years, we’ll let you.’ ”

The services know these dynamics are contributing to retention problems, and the branches have been slowly starting to experiment with different career tracks for, say, pilots, where talent shortages are pronounced. Congress last year offered the branches flexibility to reform an “up or out” system that requires officers to promote through the ranks or leave the service, among other good reforms pioneered by Mr. Kane.

Mr. Kane’s other recommendations include allowing local commanding officers to conduct interviews. Another important change would be tailored promotion and compensation, which would align the assignment process with a service member’s personal—and familial—preferences.

Yet the problem is also cultural. One Navy pilot unloaded about the service’s retention problems in Proceedings, the U.S. Naval Institute’s magazine, last year, and he hit on something: Those in charge of making changes have often been those whose careers have proceeded smoothly.

As he put it: “Every admiral to whom I’ve spoken has had an impressive career. But the common thread in all of their careers is that they never have lost or been exposed to the other side of the processes. For an overwhelming majority of them, the system has worked, so the processes must be good.”

 

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Some really solid points in this article, should be required reading for all FOGOs


Why would the faceoff specialist on my lacrosse team need to read this? He’s not even in the Air Force.

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Not Every Officer Wants to Be a General

Allowing service members to pursue different career paths would ease the strain on military families.

Kate Bachelder Odell

May 20, 2019 6:21 p.m. ET

A chronic problem has attracted bipartisan attention recently: Military spouses have trouble finding work or developing careers. Karen Pence, the vice president’s wife, has devoted much of her public profile to helping military spouses. Sens. Tom Cotton and Jeanne Shaheen have introduced a bill that aims to make it easier for military spouses to transfer occupational licenses across state lines, which would mitigate one hassle of moving. But the real problem is a military assignment system that is managed like a game of musical chairs.

A White House Council of Economic Advisers report diagnoses the headache for those married to service members: America’s 690,000 military spouses, mostly women, are roughly twice as likely to be unemployed as the rest of the civilian workforce. The rate of underemployment is worse. These trends persist even though military spouses tend to be more educated than the general workforce—some 40% have a college degree. So why do military spouses disproportionately end up in licensed trades such as cosmetology? Why are nursing and teaching common choices? Because they’re among the few careers the military lifestyle can accommodate.

In my years as a Navy wife, my employer has made accommodations for my spouse’s inflexible location. Most don’t have this luxury. Corporations are periodically called on to “do more” for military spouses, but companies that hire military spouses know that there is a high risk they won’t stick around as long as typical employees. Tax credits wouldn’t change that.

The real problem is how the military shuffles service members through various jobs and locations, which can be more of a box-checking exercise than a process that cultivates talent and skills. Spouses are along for the ride, and that means frequently having to build new career networks, which over time erodes earning potential.

Some 90% of more than 1,200 spouses surveyed by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation reported moving farther than 50 miles at least once for their partner’s career. More than a third reported four or more moves. About half who had moved said they had less than three months to prepare. This is expensive for the government, and there’s reason to wonder whether it’s necessary.

Military assignments are managed through a centralized process where large personnel outfits are “just trying to match names against available billets, and almost always not knowing the people individually,” says Tim Kane, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution who served as an Air Force intelligence officer. This top-down process can only minimally incorporate a service member’s personal preferences, never mind a spouse’s career.

Mr. Kane summed up the problem to Congress last year. The military is composed of volunteers who are dealt with more like conscripts, he said. Every young officer is treated as an aspiring general or admiral, and thus is pushed into an “ideal” set of jobs with rigid timing for promotion, without respect to competing priorities, like a wife’s job or kids who don’t want to go to a new high school every year.

Mr. Kane tells me he’s known of people who “will terminate their careers early because the Air Force or the Marines won’t tell them, ‘You know what? if you don’t want to become a general, and you just want to stay at whatever base it is for the next four years, we’ll let you.’ ”

The services know these dynamics are contributing to retention problems, and the branches have been slowly starting to experiment with different career tracks for, say, pilots, where talent shortages are pronounced. Congress last year offered the branches flexibility to reform an “up or out” system that requires officers to promote through the ranks or leave the service, among other good reforms pioneered by Mr. Kane.

Mr. Kane’s other recommendations include allowing local commanding officers to conduct interviews. Another important change would be tailored promotion and compensation, which would align the assignment process with a service member’s personal—and familial—preferences.

Yet the problem is also cultural. One Navy pilot unloaded about the service’s retention problems in Proceedings, the U.S. Naval Institute’s magazine, last year, and he hit on something: Those in charge of making changes have often been those whose careers have proceeded smoothly.

As he put it: “Every admiral to whom I’ve spoken has had an impressive career. But the common thread in all of their careers is that they never have lost or been exposed to the other side of the processes. For an overwhelming majority of them, the system has worked, so the processes must be good.”

The Pentagon hasn’t had a Senate-confirmed undersecretary for personnel and readiness since Robert Wilkie left the post in 2018 to become secretary of veterans affairs. The position has no nominee, and a good one would be someone who hasn’t spent a career marinating in the military’s culture. Anyone who takes on the massive task of reform will face bureaucratic resistance. He’ll need air support from the civil-society groups seeking better prospects for military spouses.

Fixing these dysfunctions will be essential if the military is to compete for talent in society in which fewer appear interested in signing up. An untold number of Americans never consider the military because of the crazy transience it requires. That’s regrettable.

Mrs. Odell is an editorial writer for the Journal.

Appeared in the May 21, 2019, print edition.

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I would say my wife's inability to hold a career is probably the single biggest motivating factor to me getting out. Even financially, when you run the numbers, adding a meaningful income to anything you make in the military is going to out weigh any bonus offers, etc.... and then there is the whole effect on spouses mental health. The feeling that they lack contribution to society or identity. The fact that they are only known as "Capt So-and-so's Wife" instead of by their name. And the fact that the Military keeps trying to push this creepy 1950s family model that relegated them to the home when they are better educated than their peers. 

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1 hour ago, FLEA said:

I would say my wife's inability to hold a career is probably the single biggest motivating factor to me getting out. Even financially, when you run the numbers, adding a meaningful income to anything you make in the military is going to out weigh any bonus offers, etc.... and then there is the whole effect on spouses mental health. The feeling that they lack contribution to society or identity. The fact that they are only known as "Capt So-and-so's Wife" instead of by their name. And the fact that the Military keeps trying to push this creepy 1950s family model that relegated them to the home when they are better educated than their peers. 

So true. I'm not even married. I have had CC's ask why my old lady doesn't follow me around. Because she has a great job in engineering. Then I get a puzzled look from them. I say she makes a lot of money 💰 and I leave it at that.

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Honestly am surprised it took this long.  Seems like most people on here are ignoring the bizarre posting though.

Don’t feed the trolls
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11 hours ago, FLEA said:

I would say my wife's inability to hold a career is probably the single biggest motivating factor to me getting out. Even financially, when you run the numbers, adding a meaningful income to anything you make in the military is going to out weigh any bonus offers, etc.... and then there is the whole effect on spouses mental health. The feeling that they lack contribution to society or identity. The fact that they are only known as "Capt So-and-so's Wife" instead of by their name. And the fact that the Military keeps trying to push this creepy 1950s family model that relegated them to the home when they are better educated than their peers. 

You nailed it. On AD with my wife in the 2000s, we had 9 addresses in almost 10 years, and she couldn't hold much more than part time work. Leaving AD gave her the ability to start a career and it had an enormous positive impact on her state of mind and our relationship.

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On May 22, 2019 at 6:56 PM, FLEA said:

And the fact that the Military keeps trying to push this creepy 1950s family model that relegated them to the home when they are better educated than their peers. 

While I totally get a dude's reason for getting out to allow his spouse to have a more stable career, I don't know what this "1950s family model" you're saying is being pushed on us?  

1) CDC--don't really need much of one when you have this "1950s family model"...

2) Gay marriage...definitely not 1950s

3) The fact that the vast majority of female AD AF officers are married to another officer...again, not what I would call a 1950s family model.

Active duty definitely makes it a challenge for both spouses to have a career, but that is the nature of the beast with PCSing and families desiring to stay together...if only people knew about PCSing before going on AD and then could also get out after just a few years after joining (vast majority of military aren't on commitments more than a few years).

In the end, do what's best for yourself and your family, but don't blame the AF for something you voluntarily accepted.

 

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2. 

The Air Force has zero responsibility to consider your civilian spouses career. 

Those are choices you and your spouse made. 

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Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, BashiChuni said:

2. 

The Air Force has zero responsibility to consider your civilian spouses career. 

Those are choices you and your spouse made. 

You are speaking from an officer perspective, speaking of which you are vastly out of touch. Don't speak for everyone. Most enlisted live paycheck to paycheck. Additional income is necessary at times. As a prior, you can save your ass off and still not get ahead. I'm not even married.

Edited by Shazaam
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