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29 minutes ago, brawnie said:

Yeah and an equal opposition argued against the electoral college in the anti-federalist papers. Just because they write “tyranny of the majority” doesn’t mean it turns out that way.
 

In fact, the majority of civil rights scholars agree that the electoral college and its perpetuation is a large reason that slavery wasn’t abolished sooner and the civil war happened. What is that, tyranny of the minority?

Change it when it doesn't work for your party, but crickets when it does? Looks like Schumer and gang might regret their decision for requiring only a simple majority for SC judge appointments. 

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2 hours ago, brawnie said:

And good point that the founding fathers literally made this policy up based on how they felt, with no basis in fact.

Which is exactly what you're doing in opposition.  Of course it was and is a philosophical debate. 

 

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Change it when it doesn't work for your party, but crickets when it does? Looks like Schumer and gang might regret their decision for requiring only a simple majority for SC judge appointments. 

If in 2016, Clinton won under the same conditions as Trump, do you know how many people would be saying that the electoral college need to be dismantled...Zero. Everyone knows how we elect the President in this country, campaign accordingly.
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BTW, I agree with Graham’s assessment of changes made by Democrats regarding approval of appellate judges in the last half of the video above. Both parties have a recent history of changing rules that is troubling.  However, denying a Democratic administration’s nomination nearly a year out from an election and making an about face when your party is in power is absolutely brazen hypocrisy. McConnell is making up rules as he goes. Republicans will say that it’s great for them, but what about the rest of the country? What do you think will happen when people come to terms with the fact that the presidential election is consistently skewed to the Republicans, that Republican congressional seats have been made artificially safe by gerrymandering, that Republicans have implemented rules in many state legislatures that make passing Democratic legislation nearly impossible, even when they hold the majority? Changing the rules and wryly manipulating the system for your own gains is all well and good, but if you are isolating and alienating the majority of the electorate in the process, you are actively harming the nation. 

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Money, brute force, hot chicks.

 

"Elections have consequences, I won."

 

Same as it ever was...

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23 minutes ago, jrizzell said:


If in 2016, Clinton won under the same conditions as Trump, do you know how many people would be saying that the electoral college need to be dismantled...Zero. Everyone knows how we elect the President in this country, campaign accordingly.

You have no idea if that’s true. Judging by how many people still have “Hillary for Jail“ bumper stickers, I would even venture to say you’re wrong.

Edited by brawnie
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If in 2016, Clinton won under the same conditions as Trump, do you know how many people would be saying that the electoral college need to be dismantled...Zero. Everyone knows how we elect the President in this country, campaign accordingly.
Hard disagree. During the election there was a significant group of my coworkers who were convinced Trump would win the popular vote, but lose the election and they were already talking about the "serious conversations about the electoral college" we'd need to have.

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1 hour ago, Desk Jobs Suck said:

Change it when it doesn't work for your party, but crickets when it does? Looks like Schumer and gang might regret their decision for requiring only a simple majority for SC judge appointments. 

It’s not like this is a new thing. It’s happened before and it has had criticism since literally the founding of the country. It was almost amended in 1970 but was opposed overwhelmingly by segregationists in southern states. Go ahead, read about the electoral college abolition amendment.

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45 minutes ago, busdriver said:

Which is exactly what you're doing in opposition.  Of course it was and is a philosophical debate. 

 

Of course it is, I even said it was true. There are no facts, there are opinions. Don’t twist the words.

The point is that some people idolize the system because it’s always been the system. Not because they can point to a clear way in which having someone from Wisconsin count 3.6 times as much as the exact same occupation from California makes sense for the welfare of the people.

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1 minute ago, brawnie said:

Not because they can point to a clear way in which having someone from Wisconsin count 3.6 times as much as the exact same occupation from California makes sense for the welfare of the people.

It actually been pointed out multiple times in this thread.  You just don't agree with that view point.  Just because you aren't convinced doesn't mean there isn't merit.

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Man, it's like the key is in the name - The United States of America.  I dunno, something like The Great Compromise, The Missouri Compromise, The Civil War, Brown v. Board of Education, etc.  Individual states combine into a federated system with individuals and states listed as retaining all the power except for those spelled out.  

 

There's even a rule to change the rules if you can't figure them out or win using them.

 

But that requires effort.  Much easier to demand "the gubmint" do something.

Edited by brickhistory

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Hah, I guess then you guys are gonna support when Dems add 2 Supreme Court justices, approve stateship for DC and Puerto Rico, and end the 60 vote filibuster rule here in a year, as well, right? Because they’ll do it all under the legality of the US system and constitution. They’ll be playing “by the rules,” right?

https://www.axios.com/democrats-supreme-court-ginsburg-options-871f3e66-e7a4-4f40-9691-d20de1f4be61.html

Or are these not the rules that you want to play by? The truth is, a huge amount of US politics is contingent on good will and not doing shit like saying that Obama can’t have a judge within a year of election because of morality and then being a hypocrite less than 4 years later. 

This is the end of the republic. And it’s animosity on both sides, combined with a good amount of boot licking and pearl clutching, that’s gonna do it.

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Yup.  Each legislative body sets its own rules.  The 60 vote filibuster thing is not a law that has to be undone.  Next legislative session in the Senate majority simply votes to change the rule.  And then faces the consequences at the next election.

If they want to pack the Supreme Court, they have the ability, assuming they win both Houses and the Presidency.

Elections have consequences.

Hillary shoulda tried harder in 2016.

As to adding states, there's a rule for that, too.  It's like those Founding Fathers did their homework and researched everything available on the systems of governments in history.

And I believe the territory has to apply for statehood, not just be hand-waved by Congress.  I am unfamiliar if Puerto Rico has had such a referendum that passed.  Same for DC.

And then we can get to Guam, American Samoa, US Virgin Islands, et al.

 

"You get a state!  And you get a state!  And you get a state!"

Bring it.

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2 hours ago, brawnie said:

They’ll be playing “by the rules,” right?

This is interesting.  Have you guys read/watched any of Jonathan Haidt's work on personality traits and political leanings?  It's a lot like men are from mars, women are from venus.  Basically, people will tend to lean one way or the other politically, and it strongly correlates to personality traits.  Here's one: Haidt's TedTalk

Or dumbed down to a very rough generality for discussion:  What animates liberals/conservative/libertarians?  Brett Eric Weinstein would say: unfairness, abandoning long successful systems without good cause, and coercion, respectively.  Which also make the two main teams bad and good at different things.  Dan Crenshaw has said, liberals are good at spotting unjust and unfair outcomes, but bad at figuring out how to actually fix them.  Instead preferring to tear down and replace.  Conservatives tend to be good at nuanced systems and making small changes work, but bad at seeing the unjust second order effects of their processes.

Anyway, nerdy pontification over.  I'll depart now.

Edited by busdriver

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2 hours ago, brawnie said:

There are no philosophical facts, that’s the point lol. No single idea, whether it came from a 21 year old founding father (like what you’re suggesting) or if it came from me should hold more inherent merit. Debate the ramifications - not the source.

No, there's just evidence. And the evidence reflects strongly on our system.

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Why do we assume that Garland would have been confirmed by a Republican senate even if McConnell had allowed the vote?  And does anyone really think that the Dems would not be nominating RBG's replaced right now if they controlled the Oval Office and Senate?  They would have already started the process.  

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10 minutes ago, lloyd christmas said:

And does anyone really think that the Dems would not be nominating RBG's replaced right now if they controlled the Oval Office and Senate?  They would have already started the process.  

Exactly this. 
 

And while there would have been complaining from those on the right, I doubt you would have seen the threats that are currently coming from the left. 
 

People literally threatening violence over a Supreme Court nomination. And to be honest, based on how this year has gone, if Trump does get a nomination through, I fully except there to be actual riots and violence in the streets from the left...again. 

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If Garland would’ve gotten a vote then I don’t think that there would be the pushback that were seeing. Would they have bitched? Probably, but they wouldn’t be able to point to the blatant hypocrisy from the GOP Senators as evidence of their “rules for thee but not for me” policy. In essence Trump got an extra year on his term WRT the SCOTUS and they’re rightfully upset.

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10 minutes ago, Breckey said:

If Garland would’ve gotten a vote then I don’t think that there would be the pushback that were seeing. Would they have bitched? Probably, but they wouldn’t be able to point to the blatant hypocrisy from the GOP Senators as evidence of their “rules for thee but not for me” policy. In essence Trump got an extra year on his term WRT the SCOTUS and they’re rightfully upset.

McConnell's play was a hell of a gamble.  Hillary was a shoe in at that point.  

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8 hours ago, brickhistory said:

Yup.  Each legislative body sets its own rules.  The 60 vote filibuster thing is not a law that has to be undone.  Next legislative session in the Senate majority simply votes to change the rule.  And then faces the consequences at the next election.

If they want to pack the Supreme Court, they have the ability, assuming they win both Houses and the Presidency.

Elections have consequences.

Hillary shoulda tried harder in 2016.

As to adding states, there's a rule for that, too.  It's like those Founding Fathers did their homework and researched everything available on the systems of governments in history.

And I believe the territory has to apply for statehood, not just be hand-waved by Congress.  I am unfamiliar if Puerto Rico has had such a referendum that passed.  Same for DC.

And then we can get to Guam, American Samoa, US Virgin Islands, et al.

 

"You get a state!  And you get a state!  And you get a state!"

Bring it.

Dems should be careful what they wish for.  News to me being stationed in PACAF, Guam and American Samoa lean significantly right of center in terms of politics. 

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1 hour ago, dream big said:

Dems should be careful what they wish for.  News to me being stationed in PACAF, Guam and American Samoa lean significantly right of center in terms of politics. 

Yeah I guess if 72% of votes going to Hillary is the same as right of center, sure.

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9 hours ago, brawnie said:

Hah, I guess then you guys are gonna support when Dems add 2 Supreme Court justices, approve stateship for DC and Puerto Rico, and end the 60 vote filibuster rule here in a year, as well, right? Because they’ll do it all under the legality of the US system and constitution. They’ll be playing “by the rules,” right?

https://www.axios.com/democrats-supreme-court-ginsburg-options-871f3e66-e7a4-4f40-9691-d20de1f4be61.html

Or are these not the rules that you want to play by? The truth is, a huge amount of US politics is contingent on good will and not doing shit like saying that Obama can’t have a judge within a year of election because of morality and then being a hypocrite less than 4 years later. 

This is the end of the republic. And it’s animosity on both sides, combined with a good amount of boot licking and pearl clutching, that’s gonna do it.

SCOTUS has expanded and contracted in the past, but has been at 9 justices since 1869. They absolutely can try to “pack the court” if they have the votes. I think it’s in poor taste, but they’d have every right to do so.

Congress can admit PR as well, but historically PR would have to draft a Constitution, submit it to Congress, then they’d have to pass a series of laws creating the state, and that takes time. Enough time that maybe an election cycle changes the party structure to prevent it. Worth noting that Puerto Ricans denied statehood at the ballot box in 1967, 1993, 1998 and 2012. The GAO in 2012 found statehood actually would hurt the island’s economy and set them back as they would have a higher tax burden.

DC won’t happen without a long court fight. DC is actually created in the constitution as a federally administered area, not controlled by a state. Since you like facts, here’s why. I’ll even quote the source: 

“In 1783, a crowd of disbanded Revolutionary War soldiers angry about not having been paid gathered to protest outside the building where the Continental Congress was meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The soldiers blocked the door and initially refused to allow the delegates to leave. Despite requests from the Congress, the Pennsylvania state government declined to call out its militia to deal with the unruly mob, and so Congress was forced to abruptly adjourn to New Jersey.”

After that incident, the founders realized having the nation’s seat of power in a state meant the state could control their access and/or deny them protection during the lawmaking process. To maintain impartiality, they decided, it needed to be an area without bias (I think all of this is in Federalist 43). So, the Constitution set out a plan to make that happen. Maryland and Virginia both gave land to create DC. VA ended up taking their contribution (modern day Alexandria) back after a while.

So it’s not an open and shut case for DC. It’ll be in court for forever.

These racist, fascist founders were real idiots, I tell you.

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The current proposals for DC shrink the federal district to the Mall and surrounding federal buildings. Virginia took back it's part of DC prior to the Civil War so there's prescident to make existing parts of the district part of a state.

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1 hour ago, Breckey said:

The current proposals for DC shrink the federal district to the Mall and surrounding federal buildings. Virginia took back it's part of DC prior to the Civil War so there's prescident to make existing parts of the district part of a state.

Interesting. Maryland would have to agree to that, as the Constitution requires a new state made from the lands of another to have that state’s approval.

Still poses a legal question, as the district was designed to have its own National Guard and City Government that answers to the Federal Govt. for protection’s sake. That’ll get bogged down for years. 

Edited by Kiloalpha

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