Jump to content
VL-16

Gun Talk

Recommended Posts

45 minutes ago, Hacker said:

 

I used to have the Hi Point 995TS, and although it was ugly as hell, just a tad heavy, and that big bolt reciprocating jarred my teeth when it cycled, it was utterly reliable and boringly accurate at plinking ranges.

I sold it to get an MP5 clone instead.

Nice--what kind of MP5 clone and what sized barrel?  Zenith?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, HeloDude said:

Nice--what kind of MP5 clone and what sized barrel?  Zenith?  

ATI AT-94A2.  Basically the same gun made in the same factory as the Zenith (MKE in Turkey), but the previous importer.  A2 stock and 16" CHF barrel with no muzzle device.

It was imported with a bunch of weird stuff; A2 stock spot-welded to trigger group/lower, mag-well bars to restrict use of 10-round mags, etc.  I sent it to Parabellum Combat Systems and had them 922r it, remove the mag bars, clean up the welds, strip the weird painted finish off and refinish in black duracoat.

The OD green furniture is Pakistani-made and the lower is clipped-and-pinned and US-made.

IMG_6505_zpsmyyx5ldm.jpg

IMG_0312_zps076677d1.jpg

Edited by Hacker
  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My folks opened up an ammunition manufacturing shop in Katy, TX.  They're focusing on pistol calibers at the moment, with all the things to follow:

www.lonestarmunitions.com.  

Price/rd is competitive with the big container stores and most online shops.  They load everything to moderate pressure for positive cycling but pleasant recoil, perfect for range use and teaching new shooters.  

LSM.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/2/2017 at 0:30 AM, Hacker said:

 

I used to have the Hi Point 995TS, and although it was ugly as hell, just a tad heavy, and that big bolt reciprocating jarred my teeth when it cycled, it was utterly reliable and boringly accurate at plinking ranges.

I sold it to get an MP5 clone instead.

Same.  Cheap, reliable, but disproportionate recoil to the round fired.  Other blowback actions, such as the MechTech CCU on a 1911 lower, are much smoother.  I sold it to fund some MPX accessories.  

Another option I've considered is the TNW Aero:  https://www.tnwfirearms.com/category-s/1825.htm

I'd probably get the pistol and SBR it.  13rd stock mags, or 30rd Kriss Vector mags, vs the 9rd mags of the Hi-Point.  They recently released a 10mm version, choices...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/4/2017 at 11:58 AM, Torch09 said:

My folks opened up an ammunition manufacturing shop in Katy, TX.  They're focusing on pistol calibers at the moment, with all the things to follow:

www.lonestarmunitions.com.  

Price/rd is competitive with the big container stores and most online shops.  They load everything to moderate pressure for positive cycling but pleasant recoil, perfect for range use and teaching new shooters.  

Torch, I hope your parents know more about running a reloading business than I do because I really hope they do well. Timing and politics may not be on their side. Did they get a camdex? Dillon S1050's? 

This is why I won't be buying from them in the immediate future:

SG Ammo New .45 $285/k (shipped)

Lonestar remanufactured .45 $302/k (shipped)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone seen an HK VP9sk in the wild yet? It was released as the SFP9sk in the metric countries.
http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2017/03/01/hk-sfp9-l-sfp9-sk/
http://hk-usa.com/hk-models/vp9-sk/


I'd be very interested as well.

I'm liking the possibilities here for a more full frame carry pistol to option instead of just my M&P9 shield.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/21/2017 at 0:42 PM, Warrior said:

Torch, I hope your parents know more about running a reloading business than I do because I really hope they do well. Timing and politics may not be on their side. Did they get a camdex? Dillon S1050's? 

This is why I won't be buying from them in the immediate future:

SG Ammo New .45 $285/k (shipped)

Lonestar remanufactured .45 $302/k (shipped)

 

They're currently running 2x S1050s in parallel with Mark 7 Rev upgrades.  Once they push some inventory, they'll reinvest in a larger commercial press.  It isn't a CamDex, it's the same press Federal uses at their Minnesota Plant...I forget the name at the moment.  Brass cleaning and media separation is all via machinery that they designed and built themselves.  They both grew up farming for a living, and my dad will take any excuse to break out a welder.  

Copy on pricing.  It's a small mom-and-pop operation (literally), so as they reinvest their initial sales into bigger and more efficient machinery, prices should fall.  The long term goal is to produce everything but primers (see:  recent Lake City Plant explosion) in-house, even the powder.  Interestingly enough, the most expensive single piece of equipment is the machine that draws out and forms the brass.  

Enter promo code "HeyChongerSuckOnThisJASSM".  It doesn't work for a discount, but it feels right.  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/21/2017 at 3:15 AM, Lawman said:


I'd be very interested as well.

I'm liking the possibilities here for a more full frame carry pistol to option instead of just my M&P9 shield.

 

I found one at an LGS.  It's significantly larger in all dimensions than a Shield or G43, and larger in height than a G26.  It feels great in the hand (this whole post STS), and a solid deal on an HK frame, but not the carry gun I was looking for.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just impressed the thing didn't jam after 100rds (forget the suppressor part), which has been my experience shooting this weapon maintained by many different services with varying levels of upkeep.

Regardless...looks like a rip of a good time.

Cheers

ATIS 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have any of you guys shot against stacked railroad ties as the sole backstop material? There are a lot of mixed opinions on the Internet, but many of these smell like 10% experience and 90% WOM. Looking for any experience-based info you guys might have.

Big pic: I want to build a range on my land, but the dirt is pretty soft for heavy equipment at the moment (I think), so I was thinking about stacking ties as a somewhat temp backstop until the ground hardens a bit and I can use a FEL or track loader to build a more proper dirt berm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, brabus said:

Have any of you guys shot against stacked railroad ties as the sole backstop material? There are a lot of mixed opinions on the Internet, but many of these smell like 10% experience and 90% WOM. Looking for any experience-based info you guys might have.

Big pic: I want to build a range on my land, but the dirt is pretty soft for heavy equipment at the moment (I think), so I was thinking about stacking ties as a somewhat temp backstop until the ground hardens a bit and I can use a FEL or track loader to build a more proper dirt berm.

I guy I work with is doing the same thing, and looked into railroad ties but said it was cost prohibitive for him.  Plus, there is the concern of ricocheting from previous rounds embedded into the wood.  With dirt it will get buried and the hole filled in, that doesn't happen with wood.  You will eventually get rounds flying back at you, that is why most ranges use dirt berms as back stops.

Use the railroad ties (or even old tires) as support for a berm......but not as the actual backstop!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone here into 3 gun?  I'm looking at semi auto shotguns including the Beretta 1301 comp, Remington Versamax Competition, and FM SLP Competition.  Anyone have experience with any of these?  I've heard Remington's quality has been hit or miss lately.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone here into 3 gun? I'm looking at semi auto shotguns including the Beretta 1301 comp, Remington Versamax Competition, and FM SLP Competition. Anyone have experience with any of these? I've heard Remington's quality has been hit or miss lately.


Benelli M1....


Absolutely untouchable semi auto.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Buddy Spike said:

Is it retro like the last one? Will I get my tax stamp money back?

Unfortunately I'm willing to bet that you will not.  

The problem I see with this bill is thst there is not definitive verbiage that states that supressors are removed from the NFA list.  So it will allow Trump to order his ATF and federal law enforcement agencies to not treat supressors as an NFA item, however, the next Dem in office can just reverse the order.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/15/2017 at 8:32 PM, F16Deuce said:

Anyone here into 3 gun?  I'm looking at semi auto shotguns including the Beretta 1301 comp, Remington Versamax Competition, and FM SLP Competition.  Anyone have experience with any of these?  I've heard Remington's quality has been hit or miss lately.

The Mossberg 930 Miculek edition has been working pretty well for me, at half the price of some others.  That said, I don't mess with it.  The only thing I've done is add a side saddle.  If you tinker, results may vary.

I think I've only had one failure to fire.  Not sure if it was a light strike or bad round, to be honest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Benelli seems to be the 3gun standard. Stoeger is owned by them and uses the same inertia action. Check out the M3K, it comes mostly ready to go.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/15/2017 at 11:54 AM, M2 said:

I guy I work with is doing the same thing, and looked into railroad ties but said it was cost prohibitive for him.  Plus, there is the concern of ricocheting from previous rounds embedded into the wood.  With dirt it will get buried and the hole filled in, that doesn't happen with wood.  You will eventually get rounds flying back at you, that is why most ranges use dirt berms as back stops.

Use the railroad ties (or even old tires) as support for a berm......but not as the actual backstop!

Agreed, dirt is the way to go.  I started with a wooden backstop (old, cut-up powerlines) and abandoned the project.  It splintered like crazy, making it difficult to maintain and probably leading to ricochets down the road.  I ended up stacking used tires and filling them with dirt.  I didn't have access to a front-end loader, or I would have done a huge dirt berm.  Those tires, once filled with dirt, have held up like a champ.  Stack the thicker-tread tires towards the bottom, and be sure to fill the sidewalls as much as you can for structural support.  Any tire store should be happy to be rid of their garbage.  Go to a small local shop where all the jacked-up F250s get their tires and you're sure to find some beefy tread left.

 

I stacked mine about 8ft tall, and past that I saw the potential for the tires to collapse under the weight.  I drove a T-post into the ground before I started, so it would sit in the middle of each stack of tires and help support the weight.  I stacked a front row of 8 tires, then staggered 7 tires behind them to fill the 'gaps' left in the front row.  All told, I can shoot anywhere into that wall and have at least 2.5ft and about 2 layers of tire tread.  In most places, it's about 4-5" of dirt and 4 layers of tread.  I tested a 308 and recovered the bullet; it only made it about 2ft into dirt.

 

The only weakness is slower bird shot loads, specifically shotshell loads from a revolver.  They don't have enough energy to punch through the tires, so they bounce all over the place.  2rds of that pelting my shins and I gave up.  Even the puny 20gr Aguila 22LR (480ish fps muzzle velocity) punch into the tread enough to stop and not ricochet, so I think it's just shotshells as an issue.  I've moved a couple tires and found most pistol rounds just 6-9" into the dirt.  

 

As a bonus, you can drive screws directly into the tires to hang clay pigeons, steel targets, or old pallets from Home Depot to serve as a stable platform for paper targets.  If you have a larger steel gong, wedge a couple pieces of rebar horizontally in between a couple tires as a hangar.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you fill them with dirt by shovel each time you added a row, or did you stack them all, and then fill dirt afterwards? Sounds interesting...I'll probably wait and use the FEL next month when it's drier, but still sounds like a decent idea. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, brabus said:

Did you fill them with dirt by shovel each time you added a row, or did you stack them all, and then fill dirt afterwards? Sounds interesting...I'll probably wait and use the FEL next month when it's drier, but still sounds like a decent idea. 

Filling the tires as you go ensures more thorough fill, especially inside the sidewalls.  That's pretty important if you're stacking them more than 5 or so tires tall, as the weight from above is going to crush the lower tires.  I used a shovel for all of it and it was a painful project.  Renting or borrowing a front end loader would help dump the dirt in the right place faster, but you'd still want to hand-shovel/spread the dirt around the tires to ensure you're filling the sidewalls.  If you just stacked 3 or 4 tires at a time and then dumped in dirt, you'd end up with an unknown quantity of dirt in each column; when you shoot, you don't know if the bullet will impact several feet of dirt or just some tread and then empty spaces.  Most pistol rounds will sail through 4-5 layers of tread.  

 

A trick I learned on the second backstop I built (same use of tires) was that you can fill the bottom row, drive some old lumber or fairly straight branches (stripped of any smaller branches/leaves) into the center of the pile, then continue stacking tires.  The effort you put into driving that wood into the bottom tire (sts) takes up some of the dirt you would have had to shovel in, and helps keep the follow-on tires a guide for centering them up.  If you have a 4x4 in the center, it will have about 1ft of dirt in front of it.  It's going to take a lot of rifle fire before that lumber is destroyed, and even then the dirt is there to settle into the gaps.

 

After a couple months and a few thousand rounds, I found that the dirt settled quite a bit.  I just topped off the top row and let it continue settling.  I have yet to have any columns fall over or collapse, though the bottom tires do need to be slightly thicker tread to bear the weight.  

 

If I had a front end loader, some heavy wooden beams as a support structure, and a supply of relatively rock-free dirt, I'd go for the straight dirt berm.  I have none of those, and the tires cost me $0 from some patriotic folks in town.  When I go to sell this place, I'm banking that the potential buyers are as enthusiastic about a large pile of tires on the land as I am.  Otherwise, it's going to be a PITA to tear it all down.  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×