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Sua Sponte

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When I did my masters I noticed a significant gap in literature regarding cultural intelligence (CQ) and multi-cultural aircrews in multi-crewed aircraft, and the related effects on crew resource management.  Just an idea if you have an anthro or management background as well. 

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Access to space and the responsibilities of satellite owners. With the advent of commercial spaceflight, how to manage and deconflict orbits, and who should manage the orbits. Big sky, little satellite theory probably won't hold much longer, as it is getting much cheaper to put satellites on orbit.

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Selfish interest topic. I'm paralyzed and know a couple of other military pilots who lost their jobs as a result of a serious accident/injury (amputation, paralysis, etc). It seems with the advancement of technology and its complete control of a/c systems they could reimagine flight controls/ manipulation tools so that injuries of the lower extremities wouldn't impact a pilots ability to fly an aircraft. My research was in information systems/technology (to earn tenure and keep academically qualified) but I did team up with an engineering prof here to do some preliminary work around cockpit accessibility. We worked on a grant from the FAA but never received funding so I shifted my focus back to research I had to do to keep my job. I know in passenger aircraft with the pilot also serving as an evacuation coordinator it might never happen but I could see on cargo type aircraft a day when a pilot with some type of serious mobility issue could still fly for a living. I guess I'm dreaming of an Elon Musk type paradigm shift but in aviation / aircraft cockpit controls and not automobile propulsion systems.

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1 hour ago, bfargin said:

Selfish interest topic. I'm paralyzed and know a couple of other military pilots who lost their jobs as a result of a serious accident/injury (amputation, paralysis, etc). It seems with the advancement of technology and its complete control of a/c systems they could reimagine flight controls/ manipulation tools so that injuries of the lower extremities wouldn't impact a pilots ability to fly an aircraft. My research was in information systems/technology (to earn tenure and keep academically qualified) but I did team up with an engineering prof here to do some preliminary work around cockpit accessibility. We worked on a grant from the FAA but never received funding so I shifted my focus back to research I had to do to keep my job. I know in passenger aircraft with the pilot also serving as an evacuation coordinator it might never happen but I could see on cargo type aircraft a day when a pilot with some type of serious mobility issue could still fly for a living. I guess I'm dreaming of an Elon Musk type paradigm shift but in aviation / aircraft cockpit controls and not automobile propulsion systems.

My vote is for this one (for my own reasons I am also passionate about this topic.) I am not versed in airliner rudder pedal setups but on the Airbus aren't they FBW controlled? For something with a side stick like an A320, what if on it, it had a mini spring loaded left/right toggle switch so as you fly you can use your thumb to control the rudder deflection? The switch is riding in a hinged slot that is also spring loaded than can be deflected by the thumb for brakes. 

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1 hour ago, bfargin said:

Selfish interest topic. I'm paralyzed and know a couple of other military pilots who lost their jobs as a result of a serious accident/injury (amputation, paralysis, etc). It seems with the advancement of technology and its complete control of a/c systems they could reimagine flight controls/ manipulation tools so that injuries of the lower extremities wouldn't impact a pilots ability to fly an aircraft. My research was in information systems/technology (to earn tenure and keep academically qualified) but I did team up with an engineering prof here to do some preliminary work around cockpit accessibility. We worked on a grant from the FAA but never received funding so I shifted my focus back to research I had to do to keep my job. I know in passenger aircraft with the pilot also serving as an evacuation coordinator it might never happen but I could see on cargo type aircraft a day when a pilot with some type of serious mobility issue could still fly for a living. I guess I'm dreaming of an Elon Musk type paradigm shift but in aviation / aircraft cockpit controls and not automobile propulsion systems.

Ran into a dude that knows the dude who invented the rotatable rudder control on the HOTAS for Logitech flight sticks. Since you mentioned it let me see if I can make contact and see what he knows about. 

Edited by FLEA
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Follow the $$$...conversely lead the $$$!

Research how and where and in what flying applications can pilots be eliminated with present day technology or a short leap forward in tech (just before the cutting edge, i.e. where to invest).

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25 minutes ago, FLEA said:

Ran into a dude that knows the dude who invented the rotatable rudder control on the HOTAS for Logitech flight sticks. Since you mentioned it let me see if I can make contact and see what he knows about. 

Was a Belgian astronaut in the European space agency. If you decide to go this route I can probably facilitate that connection. That is a worthy cause. 

Edited by FLEA
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Another idea I had, research alternatives to satellite communications for unmanned systems. A big limfac with unmanned systems is they are bandwidth intensive and SATCOM has a very limited and very saturated spectrum. 

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2 hours ago, hockeydork said:

My vote is for this one (for my own reasons I am also passionate about this topic.) I am not versed in airliner rudder pedal setups but on the Airbus aren't they FBW controlled? For something with a side stick like an A320, what if on it, it had a mini spring loaded left/right toggle switch so as you fly you can use your thumb to control the rudder deflection? The switch is riding in a hinged slot that is also spring loaded than can be deflected by the thumb for brakes. 

This is interesting. Though not paralyzed, I knew a ANG -130 pilot who shot his leg off in a hunting accident. He got a waiver from the AMC/CC I believe and flew again with a prosthetic leg. I also knew a -130 FE who had a leg amputated due to bone cancer and flew again. Both had to show they could egress the Herk, the pilot had to show he could adequately move the rudder pedals.

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2 hours ago, Swizzle said:

Follow the $$$...conversely lead the $$$!

Research how and where and in what flying applications can pilots be eliminated with present day technology or a short leap forward in tech (just before the cutting edge, i.e. where to invest).

Are you talking about the AI/ML that’s employed in resume/application screening?

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1 hour ago, Sua Sponte said:

This is interesting. Though not paralyzed, I knew a ANG -130 pilot who shot his leg off in a hunting accident. He got a waiver from the AMC/CC I believe and flew again with a prosthetic leg. I also knew a -130 FE who had a leg amputated due to bone cancer and flew again. Both had to show they could egress the Herk, the pilot had to show he could adequately move the rudder pedals.

There is a 130 Nav as well, lost her leg in a boating accident. She also got flight certified again and runs a non profit now for prosthetics. 

 

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1 hour ago, Sua Sponte said:

This is interesting. Though not paralyzed, I knew a ANG -130 pilot who shot his leg off in a hunting accident. He got a waiver from the AMC/CC I believe and flew again with a prosthetic leg. I also knew a -130 FE who had a leg amputated due to bone cancer and flew again. Both had to show they could egress the Herk, the pilot had to show he could adequately move the rudder pedals.

I think I have read articles about all of those people, there is also a 130 guy I think with one eye, and there's a United guy with a partially developed arm who flies. All have are inspirations to say the least. Tho I sometimes get annoyed with my situation, I am very lucky it is only what it is. 

Bfargin situation is tho can we keep someone in the cockpit controlling a jet with just hand controls. I really don't see any reason why this cannot be achieved in modern FBW jet. Another fascinating thought is the idea of a special stick or yoke being portable, and potentially carried by the pilot and swapped onto an air frame quickly. Could have some sort of standardized wiring connector across all air frames, since control axis are control axis regardless of the plane. Said pilot would just have to demonstrate ability to fly with device never touching the pedals. If you do run with this, I would know what you come up with.

 

Side but related rant: I encourage you all to consider donating your child's amniotic membrane/placenta after birth if able (we are not talking about abortion here...don't start). These contain cells that have special healing properties in the medical field. For you rich Delta guys who have no idea what to spend your coin on, I also encourage donations to the Mayo clinic. CNS injuries are incredibly complex and research into healing them needs to happen sooner rather than later. 

 

 

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Not too long after I got hurt I spent a couple of extremely long years in Memphis, prior to going back to school, working for the Paralyzed Veterans of America. I met a C-130 driver out of Little Rock who was paralyzed in a car accident (1996-1997 time frame). Her husband was a nav and they fell asleep driving. He had slight injuries, but she was a complete paraplegic at the same level as me (chest / thoracic-6/7). I forget her name and I lost touch with her so I'm not sure if she got back into light aircraft flying or not.

It was incredible the first time I soloed again after my accident. I felt whole again and still every time I fly (for 45 to 60 minutes usually two times a week) I forget for that hour about any daily wheelchair issues or concerns. Relatively cheap therapy. With the help of my EAA chapter I modified my airplane a Titan Tornado S for complete hand-control flying. I use the rear seats rudder pedals (welded on a handle that I can reach with my left hand) for rudder/ground steering and a hand brake on the center control stick for braking.

I think God every day for the use of my hands and arms. My heroes are the quadriplegics who live fulfilling lives (I can't even imagine their obstacles)!!

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8 hours ago, Sua Sponte said:

Are you talking about the AI/ML that’s employed in resume/application screening?

Holistically, now that you bring it up, I mean getting to manned flight (i.e. eval successful and unsuccessful to pilot candidates) as well as unmanned, AI-piloted aviation successfully piloting.

Pilots/piloting and pilot-duties (being manned and AI-piloted) are sinkholes of time and money. [Ask Mother Blue/ref 19 AF budget]. Researching how to best invest in these areas through a disertation/thesis topic upon how to save and wisely expend $/time WILL be of interest to those deep pockets and big spenders of aviation. Aka...a widely read topic vs dust collector in a virtual library.

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  • 1 month later...
On 10/11/2021 at 3:54 PM, jazzdude said:

Access to space and the responsibilities of satellite owners. With the advent of commercial spaceflight, how to manage and deconflict orbits, and who should manage the orbits. Big sky, little satellite theory probably won't hold much longer, as it is getting much cheaper to put satellites on orbit.

‘Big sky, little satellite’ has not worked for decades. The problem was just ignored until the launch rush started. Over 20,000 pieces of operating facilities + debris just before Starlink by it’s own got approval for ~40k in total. More than 50k satellites are planned to be launched in the nearest 50 years.

International leverage for launch slots and all the planned trials for debris removal are to handle the orbits. Reported in media.

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There is one more thought about unmanned flights, between space and orbit - suborbital ones.
The technology is making borders blur. We tend to put everything into space, including surveillance, navigation, data collection. The facilities for the crafts of both space and aviation have rockets to test that (like a  hybrid rocket) which is comparatively fresh for a new implementations.

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