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jazzdude

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jazzdude last won the day on April 3

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About jazzdude

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    Flight Lead
  • Birthday September 18

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    Charleston AFB

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  1. jazzdude

    Promotion and PRF Information

    It's the 10% BTZ an internal AF policy, or is there another driver to it?
  2. jazzdude

    BLUE: Episode 25 Pilot Pipeline

    We wouldn't be sacrificing effectiveness by not doing early sims at the Academy. A handful of sims a 6-9 months before they class up will do nothing for their performance in UPT. The studs have a hard enough time anyways remembering pattern ops after a few weeks in the instrument phase in T-6s. If VR is effective and cheap, issue the studs the equipment once they start UPT, where it can take the place of a lot of chair flying. This has nothing to do with fairness either. An Academy grad SHOULD be better prepared for UPT (and that's coming from a ROTC guy). But why waste the resources trying to train for the T-6 specifically when they'll get that training anyways at a later time, because their non-academy classmates need to get that training anyways? Instead, put the cadets up in a glider or a Cessna and actually build air sense. Teach them how to read a chart and navigate, or to read and intepret weather products. You know, the stuff that will be useful in ANY airplane, and not something that might have an effect for only the first 2-3 sorties in UPT? OTS guy might also be a guard guy with 20 hours that ends up on the struggle bus. Or a 3000 hr airline captain. Syllabus standardization ensures that both of those people, after completing UPT, will be a known quantity, regardless of their previous experience or background.
  3. jazzdude

    BLUE: Episode 25 Pilot Pipeline

    And thus a CBT (or 10) was born. Best part is, they will probably be as worthless as the flying CBTs at PIT.
  4. jazzdude

    BLUE: Episode 25 Pilot Pipeline

    Think syllabus standardization. If academy pilot-select cadets had pre-UPT training at the academy, that training would still need to be taught to the ROTC/OTS studs. No real savings in time. Best case is the ROTC/OTS studs get the same training at their UPT base prior to starting UPT. About the only thing someone needs to do before UPT is maybe learn ops limits/boldface, and show up willing to work hard and learn. If a reasonable percentage of students can't learn the info in the time allotted in the syllabus, then either the time allotted or method of instruction needs to be corrected. Otherwise, it's like saying you need to do sos correspondence before you go to sos in-residence.
  5. jazzdude

    BLUE: Episode 25 Pilot Pipeline

    Maybe a school for pilots. Learning at the undergraduate level? Undergraduate pilot school?...
  6. jazzdude

    BLUE: Episode 25 Pilot Pipeline

    Because they'll learn bad habits that need to be broken in UPT. Even in UPT, IPs fight bad gouge and the occasional group of weak swimmers that chair fly together and make each other worse.
  7. jazzdude

    What is right with the Air Force

    I'm just disappointed the "Any 2Lt" spot went away at most bases
  8. jazzdude

    Promotion and PRF Information

    And this is why the cycle never breaks. I have received "writing mentorship" exactly once in 12 years as to why what I put on a draft OPR was changed. Outside of that, changes were made with no explanation as to why. How can a supervisor know if they're missing anything? How about one of the mandatory counseling/performance feedback sessions everyone marks as doing that never really gets done? Or reviewing a draft with the ratee before sending it up the chain to make sure nothing got missed? I will grudgingly write my own reports, but when you step back and think about it, it's absolutely ridiculous, and we just do it because that's how it's always been.
  9. Couple schools of thought: 1) Get a degree not related to aviation, so you have a back up if you can't fly. You're always one doctor visit away from hanging up your wings. You can still get your ratings on the side while doing this, especially if money is not a concern. 2) If you're going to go into aviation no matter what and are getting the ratings anyways, might as well get the college credits. Might not be the cheapest way though. Also probably worth getting a class 1 medical done now to make sure there aren't any medical surprises that would preclude an airline job after you've sunk 6 figures into your aviation degree.
  10. Also consider the Air Force Academy. Used to be pretty much guaranteed pilot slot as long as you're medically qualified. I'm not sure what the rate is now, but it's traditionally been a high percentage (granted, a much higher bar for entry into the program)
  11. If your only goal is to be a military pilot, and you have no desire to serve for 4 years active in a different AFSC if you're not picked up, then ROTC is a gamble. It's competitive to get selected out of ROTC. Even if you are selected, you might fail the physical, as a couple of my buddies in ROTC did, and still be committed to serve in a different capacity. If you go through college then rush guard/reserves and don't get selected, would that be the end of your desire to serve in the military? There are different commit points. You have to commit to the AF early in ROTC, but might get help paying for college. Or you can pay your own way and rush guard/reserve units, or apply to OTS for active duty. My point is that there's no guarantees. There's no one right answer, but you have to decide if you're willing to serve as an officer, even if you're not selected for pilot. I took the gamble on ROTC, and it worked out for me. If I didn't get picked up as a pilot, I figured I'd do my 4 years then probably would've gotten out. But I wanted to at least serve, even if only for a short period.
  12. Just be careful-you sign a contract before you know your AFSC. Some people have gone to the reserves from ROTC, but it's all "needs of the air force." When I commissioned, we were offered the chance to walk away just prior to commissioning with no strings attached (including if you were on a 4 year scholarship). The year prior, a couple cadets were forced to enlist to fulfill their contract. Timing is everything. There is no justice.
  13. jazzdude

    Naviator Android App

    Still use naviator, primarily on a Samsung note 5 and Samsung galaxy tab s 8.4. Works well for general moving map, haven't used ads-b on it though. Another Android app to look into is WingX. Pretty sure the developer for that app gives a free account to CFIs and military. Haven't contacted them yet, but probably will soon. Their app has gotten a lot better, so I'd say it's at least on par with naviator. Foreflight still remains the gold standard though, but is iOS only
  14. jazzdude

    What's your favorite mission?

    Find the fun wherever you end up. In the C-17, flying (literally) around the world over the course of about 2 weeks as a brand new aircraft commander. Flying a 400k lb jet low level at 300 knots at 300' in formation to an airdrop. Airdropping supplies to FOBs in Afghanistan. 37-ship formation across a DZ during an exercise. Teaching a LT how to fly the T-6 and sending them out on their first T-6 solo. Taking a T-6 solo and raging in the MOA against your buddy, or just cloud surfing. Watching your students pin on their pilot wings. Seeing how many aileron rolls you can do in a row. As crappy as the AF can be at times, there have been moments that I treasure, knowing that I've gotten to do things that many people only dream of getting to do.
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