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Steve Davies

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How long do the effects of the G warm-up exercise last? And, assuming you do this exercise at the start of a sortie but then are unable to go straight into BFM or ACM, would you repeat it before you start pulling Gs?

I am also curious to know how much of a difference it makes to your ability to sustain Gs without experiencing GLOC.

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The "G warm-up excercise" or G Ex has nothing to do with long term sustaining of G, or increasing your ability to sustain Gs. It's purpose is to test that the jet/g-suit is working properly, and that you are physically up to PAR that day to pull Gs. The first turn is usually sustaining at ~430 knots and 3-4 Gs to ensure your G-suit and other equipment is working properly. The second turn is an energy depleting ~430 knots at 7.5 Gs to 350 knots and then sustained. On this second turn you are checking to make sure your body is good to go to handle "high" G maneuvering that day.

Are you going to die if you don't do a G Ex prior to BFM? Probably not. But if you had a bad G suit, jet problem, weren't hydrated or feeling well you'd like to know that before you put on your first 9 g turn of the day.

Cheers,

Beerman

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Steve, there may be new knee-jerk reactions coming down the pipe (STS) from big blue about the time between the G ex and high G maneuvers. I totally agree with Beerman that it doesn't make a hill of beans difference, but a recent high-G "incident" with an experienced Eagle guy has some non-fighter dudes raising eyebrows that it was about 40 mins between the G ex and the G incident. Hopefully we'll get no additional guidance but skulls up - it could be a new "safety" requirement... :banghead:

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The "G warm-up excercise" or G Ex has nothing to do with long term sustaining of G, or increasing your ability to sustain Gs.

I don't agree... at least for the first time you pull hard on the pole.

I haven't been through the High G physiology course in a few years, but unless they've debunked it, I remember being taught the G-X initiates a physiological response (I think it was called the "cardiac response"), and it causes your physiology to kick in and give you a higher G tolerance, compared with what you will sustain on your first moderate-to-high G maneuver... which should be that G-X.

Edited by Huggyu2

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I was also under the impression that part of the G-ex was to give you a feel, or a return to familiarity, about what xx G's feels like. So when the pilot is really cranking the nose around, he has an immediate reference "That feels like 5 G's..."

I've never been in an air-to-air fight in a fighter, but I can imagine that you want to spend a minimum amount of time looking at the G-meter instead of looking at yoru adversary.

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Uh, what?

If you're confused over the word "maximally", try the big book of hard words...Of course, I could have just said max perform the jet, but that would be improper grammar

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If you're confused over the word "maximally", try the big book of hard words...Of course, I could have just said max perform the jet, but that would be improper grammar

Are you trying to start a fight?

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If you're confused over the word "maximally", try the big book of hard words...Of course, I could have just said max perform the jet, but that would be improper grammar

Not confused...just surprised at the extremely awkward way you described something very simple that pointy-nosed people have been describing for ages.

It's okay -- "deconflict" isn't in the dictionary, either, as are a whole slew of other words that we use regularly.

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It's okay -- "deconflict" isn't in the dictionary, either, as are a whole slew of other words that we use regularly.

Sounds like a good idea for a thread. Not sure if this is how you spell it, but "schosh" is one of my favorites. "Hyaka" is pretty good too.

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Guest Alarm Red

Sounds like a good idea for a thread. Not sure if this is how you spell it, but "schosh" is one of my favorites. "Hyaka" is pretty good too.

For when this gets separated into its own thread:

I always thought 'skosh' had Japanese origins; skoshi means 'few' or 'very little'. Hell, the radius defense used to be called the Kobayashi.

Like Hacker's 'deconflict', another incorrect usage but far too common for anyone to care is 'transition' as a verb. The verb is 'transit' but this misuse is deeply rooted.

Colloquialisms that drive me bat shit - (dis)orientate, irregardless, 'for all intensive purposes'. When I hear those in a brief I make a note never to send my kids to the college of which said briefer is a product.

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Guest Alarm Red

I thought it was "for all intents and purposes". That makes more sense

It is.

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For when this gets separated into its own thread:

I always thought 'skosh' had Japanese origins; skoshi means 'few' or 'very little'. Hell, the radius defense used to be called the Kobayashi.

Like Hacker's 'deconflict', another incorrect usage but far too common for anyone to care is 'transition' as a verb. The verb is 'transit' but this misuse is deeply rooted.

Colloquialisms that drive me bat shit - (dis)orientate, irregardless, 'for all intensive purposes'. When I hear those in a brief I make a note never to send my kids to the college of which said briefer is a product.

Those are some good ones. The one that drives me nuts every time I hear it is "I could care less." The correct statement is I couldn't care less. If you could care less, do it, and stop freaking complaining.

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For when this gets separated into its own thread:

I always thought 'skosh' had Japanese origins; skoshi means 'few' or 'very little'. Hell, the radius defense used to be called the Kobayashi.

Like Hacker's 'deconflict', another incorrect usage but far too common for anyone to care is 'transition' as a verb. The verb is 'transit' but this misuse is deeply rooted.

Colloquialisms that drive me bat shit - (dis)orientate, irregardless, 'for all intensive purposes'. When I hear those in a brief I make a note never to send my kids to the college of which said briefer is a product.

Actually, the Koayashi was the common term for the "excessive lift vector in lead" maneuver that is typically used during a radius defense. Hair split.

Sledy

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Sounds like a good idea for a thread. Not sure if this is how you spell it, but "schosh" is one of my favorites. "Hyaka" is pretty good too.

Since Alarm Red noted that the Japanese "sukoshi" might be the origin of the former, I'll hypothesize that the latter might come from "hayaku," Japanese for "quickly" or "hastily." Don't have any historical evidence to back this up, but the semantic link seems possible.

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In response to the other misuses of the English language, I'll add these few as well.

When talking about your awards/decorations, you didn't get "An Accomidation Medal" unless it was for the time you spent sleeping at the Motel 6 you were in last night.

And the killer for me with grammar is talking about "loosing" things. Or use or "loose" leave. It's LOSING, or LOSE you morons.

Back to your regularly scheduled thread.

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Practical versus practicable is one of my favorites. . .

prac⋅ti⋅ca⋅ble

–adjective

1. capable of being done, effected, or put into practice, with the available means; feasible: a practicable solution.

2. capable of being used: a practicable gift.

3. Theater. (of a stage property or part of a set) designed or constructed for actual use; a practicable window; practicable water faucets.

Origin:

1660–70; < ML practic(āre) to practice + -able

Related forms:

prac⋅ti⋅ca⋅bil⋅i⋅ty, prac⋅ti⋅ca⋅ble⋅ness, noun

prac⋅ti⋅ca⋅bly, adverb

Synonyms:

1. workable, achievable, attainable. See possible.

Antonyms:

1. unfeasible.

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Years ago, I had "practicable" removed from our boldface. Webster's Dictionary said that practicable meant something was possible. The example in the dictionary was "it is 'practicable' to transport children to school via hot air balloon, but it is not 'practical'".

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We also do the GX to increase our blood pressure because after your body feels G's there is a cardiac response that will help you resist more G's for the rest of the flight.

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Wow... who knew a question to the pointy-noses about pulling Gs would turn into an Internet grammar fight?

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Wow... who knew a question to the pointy-noses about pulling Gs would turn into an Internet grammar fight?

2

....and the misuse of to and too, your, you're, there, they're, and their piss me off, too.

Edited by HerkFE

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