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How to improve your chances

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Bump,

I guess my thought on reading this is it might actually be worse, now instead of just seeing the GPA, the guys looking at my transcript will see every class I took and they can look over my whole college career, why did you fail algebra? and take it twice, why did you withdraw from so many classes? Hopefully they would take into thought that that was early on (around 5 years ago and I finished school pretty strong to try to make up for my slacker days)

Why not try good ol' honesty and just tell them why you failed a class? If they see you pulled up your grades and finished strong, your honesty is another plus to the list. If you were managing your time poorly, or you took to big of a load, or you just slacked because you didn't care. Tell them. If I was looking at you and needed to make a decision, one of the biggest things I would ask is, Have you learned from your mistakes? What did you do to fix them? And why? I respect a human being who holds accountability for their mistakes and makes the initiative to change.

Grades aren't everything. At the end of the day, I'd rather follow a man with strong character and motive.

Edited by yerfer

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Why not try good ol' honesty and just tell them why you failed a class? If they see you pulled up your grades and finished strong, your honesty is another plus to the list. If you were managing your time poorly, or you took to big of a load, or you just slacked because you didn't care. Tell them. If I was looking at you and needed to make a decision, one of the biggest things I would ask is, Have you learned from your mistakes? What did you do to fix them? And why? I respect a human being who holds accountability for their mistakes and makes the initiative to change.

Grades aren't everything. At the end of the day, I'd rather follow a man with strong character and motive.

Thanks, great advice!

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Guest scottlpool2003

I'm from and live in GB, would I be eligible? Our army sucks, too many of our forces are shooting each other so sack that off.

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Great first post scottlpool2003, you are off to a great start. I'm sure you will get some courteous responses very soon.

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I'm from and live in GB, would I be eligible? Our army sucks, too many of our forces are shooting each other so sack that off.

Troll

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Guest tenguFlyer
Troll

I think he is making an advertisement. How many people do you know set up their signature block with links to external websites on their first post? By generating a troll response a lot of people will visit this thread and see the links. Some people will click them out of curiosity on this guy and generate hits. Thats my theory anyway.

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Guest jon110334

I think some people on this thread are confusing Objective Scoring and Subjective Scoring.

Objectively, your major makes no difference whatsoever, only your GPA does. Subjectively, it depends on who is grading your package.

Objectively, volunteering doesn't make any difference... but subjectively it does.

Objectively, having or working on your master's doesn't mean a thing... subjectively it could.

I have a PCSM score of 99 and 0 Flight hours. Objectively, that shouldn't hurt me but I know that subjectively it does.

Realize this, the "whole person concept" is always there. Everything you provide them (or don't in my case) will be used to rack and stack you, whether it explicitly states it in the scoring process or not!

The last board I met was at an ANG unit.

Physical Fitness: 10%

PCSM : 15%

GPA: 20%

AFOQT: 5%

INTERVIEW: 50%

If you look at board selection methods, you can call it "commander's rating" or "interview", but there is a subjective flexability put in there... so your ducks better be in a row if you want this job.

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Guest AspiringPilot

Hey guys, I'm reading contradictory statements so I thought I'd clarify here. On the main website's Q&A they say that in order to get a pilot slot, I really should have some flight hours and that having a PPL would be ideal but even 5 or 10 is better than zero. In the forums I've read that they prefer that you have ZERO hours because this way you learn their way and don't fly the plane the civilian way. So, what's the right thing here? I'm a sophomore in college, paying for a PPL is not going to be an option, should I take 10 hours of lessons by the time I apply for OTS? How many of you had zero hours and got a slot?

Thanks

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Hey guys, I'm reading contradictory statements so I thought I'd clarify here. On the main website's Q&A they say that in order to get a pilot slot, I really should have some flight hours and that having a PPL would be ideal but even 5 or 10 is better than zero. In the forums I've read that they prefer that you have ZERO hours because this way you learn their way and don't fly the plane the civilian way. So, what's the right thing here? I'm a sophomore in college, paying for a PPL is not going to be an option, should I take 10 hours of lessons by the time I apply for OTS? How many of you had zero hours and got a slot?

Thanks

Having a PPL, or at least some hours, shows that you can comprehend the information for flying. And then also, it shows that you enjoy the flying as opposed to people who get to flight training with no flying experience and who thought it would be "cool" and then deciding it just wasn't for them.

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Hi, I am looking forward to becoming an f18 super hornet pilot in the navy or flying F35Cs. My question is, how do you get an NSS score of above 70 in flight school? Anyone who's already done this? Also, how many flight slots are given to the naval academy each year? In flight school, how many people usually have their pilot licenses/ instrument ratings, etc vs the many people in a class? How many jet slots go out in a class every year?

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Step 1. Graduate High School
Step 2. Get into an Academy, college, OTS and/or ROTC

Step 3. Finish top of your class so you earn a pilot slot

Step 4. Pass API and IFS

Step 5. Pass ground school

Step 6. Don't puke your brains out pre-solo

...

...

...

...

Step 69. Worry about F-35s, Hornets, and NSS scores

Really man, don't post again about anything else until you are a few more steps down the road. Focus, my friend. It's a long road.

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Hi, I am looking forward to becoming an f18 super hornet pilot in the navy or flying F35Cs. My question is, how do you get an NSS score of above 70 in flight school? Anyone who's already done this? Also, how many flight slots are given to the naval academy each year? In flight school, how many people usually have their pilot licenses/ instrument ratings, etc vs the many people in a class? How many jet slots go out in a class every year?

A bunch of us have already done this and are flying F-35's. It's really pretty easy.

1.) Don't suck.

2.) Finish #1 in your pilot training class

3.) Call AFPC or the Navy equivalent and make sure that they put an F-35 or F-18 Super Hornet in your assignment drop.

4.) Fly around with afterburners lit everywhere and make GoPro videos to dubstep music to upload on Facebook/Youtube/Vimeo to impress all of your closest internet friends.

5.) Marry a supermodel.

6.) Profit.

It's really pretty easy and it's obvious you've done your research on here. Whatever you do though, don't join the real Air Force and find yourself stuck doing queep all the time jumping through hoops for whatever next assignment/promotion you're hoping for. Good luck!

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Hello, I'm new. So I'm just recently started talking to a recruiter about joining the Technical Degree Sponsorship Program for finishing a 4 year Electrical Engineering degree and starting OTS. There is very little information from officers who went through this program. I've got my associates and with a 3.0 gpa. Is there any additional information to know about getting accepted to this program?

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I would do ANYTHING to become a fighter pilot. I know that is an incredibly specific and challenging goal. I’m currently in 10th grade and have researched every possible way of accomplishing this, however, I have quite a bit of things working against me. First, my grades not good neither bad (I know this is terrible but, it was before I knew what hard work I had to put in). Second, I had shoulder surgery and tore my other one. Both are healing fine. I love fitness so that’s not an issue. Third is I would need some sort of eye surgery. Can I get it now and still get in? This is where it all plays out. Even though I’m a fitness junkie, I was suspended from all sports this year due to the surgery and probably next year too. But I still remain active just not on a team sport. I know this is a lot of info. There are a lot of things working against me. But I do have an  abundance of is passion, dedication, and determination. Can someone give an honest opinion on my current situation? 

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Good Morning Ladies and Gentlemen,

I served 8 years 7 months in the United States Marine Corps, prior to attending the university i am currently attending full time at. After talking with recruiters, looking at chat forums, watching YouTube videos, and reading the prereq's, i still feel like i am in the "gray" area when it comes to being able to be selected as a pilot. I will skip the whole "I really desired to be a pilot speech" for if i didn't dream of being a pilot why would i be searching for answers in this forum then. My concerns are the following:

1. Though i have years of enlisted service in the USMC as an Infantry Squad Leader, I just turned 29 years old with 2-3 years left of education until i am able to receive my bachelors degree in Criminal Justice. Will being 31/32 years old impact my ability to be able to become a fighter pilot?

2. I am currently going through a divorce, and have 1 child-- which i hope to be able to have joint legal and physical custody. Will me being a "single parent" affect my ability to become a pilot? When i was looking at the Army's WO program, they said it was impossible for me to be active duty helo pilot because of this. It caught me off guard, but i began to worry that the Airforce would go the same direction. In fact, the recruiter stated that i would have to pretty much give up my custody in order to fly and be a helo pilot active duty. This isn't even up for questioning, i wouldn't choose the military over my son. 

3.  I am currently getting together Letters of Recommendation from my old commands, mostly from commissioned officers. Will Letters of Recommendation be accepted in the package if i receive them a few years prior to commissioning? Also is there a limit to how many I can put in my package?

4. What can I do now, besides doing as best I can in school, to prepare for this? I know I want to retake the ASVAB, and will maintain being physically fit, but I am looking for a mentor that could potentially help me head in the right direction. 

Thank you for taking the time to read my message, I understand if you aren't willing or able to respond. 

Respectfully,

Austin

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On 4/21/2018 at 9:37 AM, Ajanutol said:

Good Morning Ladies and Gentlemen,

I served 8 years 7 months in the United States Marine Corps, prior to attending the university i am currently attending full time at. After talking with recruiters, looking at chat forums, watching YouTube videos, and reading the prereq's, i still feel like i am in the "gray" area when it comes to being able to be selected as a pilot. I will skip the whole "I really desired to be a pilot speech" for if i didn't dream of being a pilot why would i be searching for answers in this forum then. My concerns are the following:

1. Though i have years of enlisted service in the USMC as an Infantry Squad Leader, I just turned 29 years old with 2-3 years left of education until i am able to receive my bachelors degree in Criminal Justice. Will being 31/32 years old impact my ability to be able to become a fighter pilot?

2. I am currently going through a divorce, and have 1 child-- which i hope to be able to have joint legal and physical custody. Will me being a "single parent" affect my ability to become a pilot? When i was looking at the Army's WO program, they said it was impossible for me to be active duty helo pilot because of this. It caught me off guard, but i began to worry that the Airforce would go the same direction. In fact, the recruiter stated that i would have to pretty much give up my custody in order to fly and be a helo pilot active duty. This isn't even up for questioning, i wouldn't choose the military over my son. 

3.  I am currently getting together Letters of Recommendation from my old commands, mostly from commissioned officers. Will Letters of Recommendation be accepted in the package if i receive them a few years prior to commissioning? Also is there a limit to how many I can put in my package?

4. What can I do now, besides doing as best I can in school, to prepare for this? I know I want to retake the ASVAB, and will maintain being physically fit, but I am looking for a mentor that could potentially help me head in the right direction. 

Thank you for taking the time to read my message, I understand if you aren't willing or able to respond. 

Respectfully,

Austin

I'm no expert on this but here's some serious things to consider. I'm a recent college grad working on getting into the AFR, ANG, or lastly AD Air Force to become a pilot. My senior year of college I studied long and hard and took the AFOQT and TBAS tests (as far as I know, ASVAB is useless for the AF pilot route). I'm earning a PPL currently; it is reasonable to expect the whole process from testing to actually getting "hired" by a unit to take at least a year possibly more. Not including shipping off to BMT, OCS, UPT, and all the other training lead times that are included once you're in the system. So if you have the AF in mind, you should probably do some research into the non-academy/AFROTC route to pilot (same as I'm taking except I'm only 22). Browse the "what are my chances?" thread to see what individuals like me are working on. There's plenty of other resources out there but sounds like you need to have your recruiter lay out the timeline for you to see if its still possible. There are age waivers, can't recall the cutoff but you're close to or will need a waiver. Expect to be away from home / active duty for ~2 yrs of training, regardless of whether you're joining active vs. reserve. UPT is 54 weeks alone I think. So I highly doubt you could maintain child custody for that.

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1 hour ago, jvlonardo said:

I'm no expert on this but here's some serious things to consider. I'm a recent college grad working on getting into the AFR, ANG, or lastly AD Air Force to become a pilot. My senior year of college I studied long and hard and took the AFOQT and TBAS tests (as far as I know, ASVAB is useless for the AF pilot route). I'm earning a PPL currently; it is reasonable to expect the whole process from testing to actually getting "hired" by a unit to take at least a year possibly more. Not including shipping off to BMT, OCS, UPT, and all the other training lead times that are included once you're in the system. So if you have the AF in mind, you should probably do some research into the non-academy/AFROTC route to pilot (same as I'm taking except I'm only 22). Browse the "what are my chances?" thread to see what individuals like me are working on. There's plenty of other resources out there but sounds like you need to have your recruiter lay out the timeline for you to see if its still possible. There are age waivers, can't recall the cutoff but you're close to or will need a waiver. Expect to be away from home / active duty for ~2 yrs of training, regardless of whether you're joining active vs. reserve. UPT is 54 weeks alone I think. So I highly doubt you could maintain child custody for that.

Going AFROTC is probably a no-go for him. The official site says that cadets selected for rated AFSCs have to commission by age 29. Age waivers are pretty much unheard of for active duty rated acquisitions too (but age ETPs do seem to get approved for the active duty boards for already commissioned officers to cross-train). With his age, a Guard or Reserve unit pushing for an age waiver is his best bet unless he wants to commission into a non-rated AFSC (or possibly RPA since there's a blanket age waiver in effect extending the age to 35) and then apply for the active duty rated board with an age ETP when eligible (this requires you to serve in your current AFSC for 2.5 years before you'd be able to begin UPT, to my knowledge).

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Is being a JTAC-I (I am one) held in high regard with most fighter squadrons? Just trying to gauge how much or how little it would actually matter. 

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On ‎10‎/‎17‎/‎2008 at 7:47 PM, Toro said:

There's been a general trend here of guys asking "How can I improve my chances?" and getting responses like "This has been discussed, do a search." I'm the first one to pass out a UTFSF card, but the way the info is arranged sporadically throughout a number of threads and jammed in the middle of a bunch of stats, I admit it's tough to search for and find. I’ve tried to merge the posts into one jumbo thread, but it was so random and scattered it didn’t make much sense, so I’m going to start a new thread with stolen and linked info from the old threads (click on each subject for a link to a separate thread on that subject). This is intended primarily for pilot slot applicants, but feel free to add info on how to improve your chances for ROTC/OTS/USAFA. After you read Brabus' post on evaluating your chances for a pilot slot and before you ask how to improve your chances, read through this thread. This is NOT for posting stats and chances, it's for generic methods of improvement.

 

Flying hours – Not necessary and a lot of hours may actually work against you (un-learning civilian flying to follow the Air Force way), but a small number of hours could be beneficial to give you a general feel for flying and concept of the principles. Additionally, it shows that you’re motivated enough to get out there and get some training yourself.

 

GPA/degree: Your GPA is huge, the associated degree is not. A technical degree will help you get into ROTC or help you if you want to be a test pilot down the line, but a 4.0 English major does not weigh higher than an engineering 4.0 major. High school GPA does not matter.

 

AFOQT scores: You have the option to re-take, but the second test will be your score. If you score worse the second time around, you take a hit. The only question I have is whether there is a cut-off at which you would recommend re-taking the test?

 

Citizenship – Get it. You cannot commission into the military if you are not a US citizen.

 

Fitness: Improve it. Your Physical Fitness Test score weighs into your PCSM score.

 

Commander’s Ranking: This can be huge, not only for your OM, but in terms of what your commander may decide to help you out with.

 

Extracurricular: This will help you for the ‘whole person’ concept, but where you’ll really make your money is in volunteering, primarily in Det activities. Also reference the commander’s ranking thread.

 

Ethnic background – Doesn’t matter. Affirmative action won’t help you and prejudice won’t work against you. “If you can fly a jet, I dont care if youre purple-skinned or Klingon. There is no gender bias. There is no racial bias. There is SKILLS bias.”

 

That's what I've got it, discussion is open for additional recommendations and questions.

Mr. Toro or anyone who can answer these questions, I have a question. So I am extremely interested since I was really young, in becoming a fighter pilot. I have watching videos and reading about how to prepare for school whether it is OTS/ROTC/AFA, as a person who is not strong in math and I learn a little slower, what would you say I need to do to prepare myself for the TBAS, AFOQT, and the other tests? I am nervous because I want to go the best route and yet I don't know what route to go, that is the best for me. Kind of confused if you would. I am in school and I have a GPA of 3.5, but it is a School of Discipleship and it is a one to two-year program. I am excited to start down this path.

Another question is do I have to agree to a certain amount of time of active duty after I complete OTS or AFA? Or can I do National Gaurd or Reserve and be like part-time active? Is that even all that realistic for me to be thinking of? Also, how do the holidays look like for National Gaurd people?

Are there prep book online I can order and prepare for all these tests?

 

I appreciate the answers... Thank you much! 

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