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sputnik

BACN BD-700 / E11A

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Anybody hear about this? Saw some email on it and it's a plane/mission/deployment I'd never heard of. Not shopping for deployments...but it's always nice to see what's out there. Sorta seems like a manned UAV but anything beats the 'Died. Unless it operates out of the 'Died of course.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battlefield_Airborne_Communications_Node

Edit: I searched but couldn't find anything

Edited by sputnik

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Anybody hear about this? Saw some email on it and it's a plane/mission/deployment I'd never heard of. Not shopping for deployments...but it's always nice to see what's out there. Sorta seems like a manned UAV but anything beats the 'Died. Unless it operates out of the 'Died of course.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battlefield_Airborne_Communications_Node

Edit: I searched but couldn't find anything

Northrop Grumman news

Northrop Grumman Awarded $276 Million Contract to Field Battlefield Airborne Communications Node

SAN DIEGO, July 14, 2009 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The U.S. Air Force awarded Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) a $276 million contract on June 24 for fielding and operational deployment of the Battlefield Airborne Communications Node (BACN), an airborne communications system that provides warfighters with critical real-time battlefield information.

The 653rd Electronic Systems Group, Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., made the award to fulfill an urgent and compelling requirement for enhanced communications capability for Overseas Contingency Operation. Tasking under the joint urgent operational need includes installing BACN on two Bombardier BD-700 Global Express aircraft and two Global Hawk Block 20 unmanned aerial vehicles. The contract will also fund the company's support for continuing operations of the existing BACN-equipped BD-700, which the Air Force deployed to meet warfighter requirements in December 2008.

"BACN's ability to translate and share data among disparate battlefield communications systems using our gateway manager algorithms and Internet protocols resolves interoperability problems, provides commanders and warfighters with battle-space-awareness, and most importantly, gives the ground soldier persistent communications with ground support platforms and command centers," said Roger Fujii, vice president of Network Communication Systems for Northrop Grumman's Information Systems sector.

Designed for use in a variety of unmanned and manned aircraft, BACN is a forward-deployed airborne communications relay and network-centric enterprise information server. BACN extends communications ranges, bridges between radio frequencies and "translates" among incompatible communications systems to enable information sharing and enhanced situational awareness. Northrop Grumman developed BACN under a Defense Microelectronics Activity contract as part of the Interim Gateway program.

"Battlefield communications advancements in aerial gateway technology have significantly enhanced our warfighter's combat effectiveness and capability to stop the adversary while saving countless lives of our troops and allied forces," said Colonel Cordell DeLapena, commander of the 653rd Electronic Systems Group at Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass.

The award solidifies Northrop Grumman's leadership in network-centric operations while providing proven technology and operational expertise to the combatant commanders.

Production and integration will be performed at Northrop Grumman facilities in San Diego.

Northrop Grumman Corporation is a leading global security company whose 120,000 employees provide innovative systems, products, and solutions in aerospace, electronics, information systems, shipbuilding and technical services to government and commercial customers worldwide.

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PM me. I'll tell you about life flying the global in the land of the Poo Pond.

I have a buddy that did that gig. Didn't enjoy it too much and ended up getting extended from 6 to 8 months. At least you get a type rating.

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Global Express is a phenominal type rating to have, if you are into that kind of thing.

Why? Like for corporate flying? Or just because it's a cool jet?

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I think maybe some guys overestimate the value of a type rating.

Airlines (for the most part) don't give a crap about your type ratings (unless you are applying to SW, in which case you need a 737 type). Type ratings are relatively easy to get--all it takes is a 1-2 week course to go from never having seen the airplane before to being type rated as a captain. They don't indicate any real degree of proficiency or skill, so they are not enormously impressive to hiring managers. They are going to train you up the same way whether you have zero type ratings or a dozen.

If you're interested in corporate, then having a type can be somewhat useful...but really only if you are current in that jet and try to get hired by someplace that flies that very same jet. But corporate hiring is going to be slim/none for a while for the most part. LOTS of those dudes got laid off in the recession and will be first in line to get those jobs when they come back. Many corporations are going to be pretty reluctant to do much expansion in their aviation departments because having a fleet of corporate jets became a symbol of excess in many of these companies as times got tough.

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It is a $60k type rating. If your desire is to fly corporate, the Global Express is one of the top paid in the industry.

Valid point on the cost. I just want dudes to understand that they probably shouldn't make career decisions under the guise of getting a bunch of type ratings that are really only useful in a pretty narrow set of circumstances.

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Global Express is a phenominal type rating to have, if you are into that kind of thing.

Better get a job 6 months to a year after you rotate home or that phenomenal type rating isn't worth the paper it's written on. Trust me.

Edited by farva

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I think maybe some guys overestimate the value of a type rating.

If you're interested in corporate, then having a type can be somewhat useful...but really only if you are current in that jet and try to get hired by someplace that flies that very same jet.

My experience is very limited but is aligned with what Noonin is saying.

I got an offer right after I retired with a corporate operation that flies GV. I had 0.0 hours in the jet. There were lots of applicants, most with type ratings. All 17 of their current pilots were prior military. They never even asked me a question about flying in the two interviews. First interview was about my background and experiences (in the form of bullshitting with them about TDYs and "this one time at band camp" war stories), second was an hour sitting in the jet in the hanger where the chief pilot showed me all the bells and whistles and the only question I had was "All this nav shit is cool but where do the bullets come out?" which made him laugh his ass off.

It was like pledging a Guard unit. They knew I could fly, they knew they would train me on the technical piece and all they really wanted to know was whether or not I would be a social fit or the buzzkilling PITA high mx TDY guy.

Other corp flying units are different I'm sure but I bet they're more like this than the standard airline haze bullshit.

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Rainman and Noonin,

Very true. I have had at least 20 calls to go fly the Global as a contract pilot. First thing I ask is "Are you gunna pay for my re-current?" After they say no, I say "have a nice day". (CAE Dallas has let me come down and get T/O and Landing currency if I agreed to be seat meat for a solo initial qual guy) If you want to live the life of a contract pilot it can be very lucrative. Contract Global pilots make around $1200 a day plus expenses. With that being said, almost all of my offers were to fly for either oil execs out of Nigeria/Algeria or to fly for the Kadafi family out of Tripoli (No shit got that call about 2 years ago). Fuck that noise.

Edited by Gas Man

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Two guys in my unit did 6 month tours as well, and they both said they loved it. They were out of K-har. It all depends on what if you have six months to kill!

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Define rewarding.

1: yielding or likely to yield a reward : valuable, satisfying

We were a valuable asset to the guys on the ground and were involved in multiple instances where our team made the difference to either the capture or killing of the dirkas. My tour was satisfying.

Maybe others flying fighters or a bomber that is actively involved would not find it as rewarding.

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