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So had my FC1 at Scott a couple months back and to make a long story short they forgot to write down my scores for the accommodation vision portion when I was in flight medicine. So back to the hospital I went and they discovered it blank and sent me to a different vision area (optometrist I'd guess). There they used a completely different method for the test, just a yard stick and a pen rather than some special purpose looking slide ruler). And I guess I was .01 or so outside the limit.

Now they want me back to retest and I just want to know what this thing even covers. The procedure was they would start gradually sliding an object toward my eye then I would have to call out when it went blurry. So is .01 to far away or to close?

Thanks!

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Ok here is my issue. I'm currently a loadmaster in the guard hoping to go to UPT sometime next year. I go up for my first board here in about a month with my unit. My vision sucks so I've got to get the eyeballs fixed up. I spent almost 6 months trying to get the permission to proceed letter from the CRS registry over at JWRSC - WHMC. After finally getting everything documented that they needed, they issued my permission a week or two ago. They will only allow me to get PRK claiming that LASIK is a disqualifier for UPT. I argued this and presented the reg with no luck.

My vision is around 20/300 in both eyes with -3.00 in both. I don't have any astigmatism so I am pretty sure I qualify for LASIK.

So here is my main question: I am scheduled to have PRK this friday. Needless to say I am a bit nervous. I am not looking forward to the longer recovery period of PRK. Should I delay surgery, and fight to get LASIK, or will I be better suited to go ahead with PRK? After all of my research it seems that the long term success is about the same with each. Thanks for all the great info regarding this!

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Guest P27:17
Ok here is my issue. I'm currently a loadmaster in the guard hoping to go to UPT sometime next year. I go up for my first board here in about a month with my unit. My vision sucks so I've got to get the eyeballs fixed up. I spent almost 6 months trying to get the permission to proceed letter from the CRS registry over at JWRSC - WHMC. After finally getting everything documented that they needed, they issued my permission a week or two ago. They will only allow me to get PRK claiming that LASIK is a disqualifier for UPT. I argued this and presented the reg with no luck.

My vision is around 20/300 in both eyes with -3.00 in both. I don't have any astigmatism so I am pretty sure I qualify for LASIK.

So here is my main question: I am scheduled to have PRK this friday. Needless to say I am a bit nervous. I am not looking forward to the longer recovery period of PRK. Should I delay surgery, and fight to get LASIK, or will I be better suited to go ahead with PRK? After all of my research it seems that the long term success is about the same with each. Thanks for all the great info regarding this!

Who is "they'?

PRK and LASIK are approved CRS proceedures for pilot applicants. PRK does take a little longer to heal intitially but it also doesn't leave a "flap". LASIK is usually the only option left for applicants in the higher refractive error range...both will require a full year of healing before you can be cleared by Brooks.

The decision is yours...but the info you are getting from "they" is bu!!$%!#...

So had my FC1 at Scott a couple months back and to make a long story short they forgot to write down my scores for the accommodation vision portion when I was in flight medicine. So back to the hospital I went and they discovered it blank and sent me to a different vision area (optometrist I'd guess). There they used a completely different method for the test, just a yard stick and a pen rather than some special purpose looking slide ruler). And I guess I was .01 or so outside the limit.

Now they want me back to retest and I just want to know what this thing even covers. The procedure was they would start gradually sliding an object toward my eye then I would have to call out when it went blurry. So is .01 to far away or to close?

Thanks!

What you describe sounds like a mix of the accommodation and point of coonvergence tests.

Accommodation is done on a Prince Rule and is measured in diopters...as the pull the card away on the rule they want to know when you can read the letters.

PC is measured in millimeters....they start at the far end of the ruler and slide and object (pen) up the ruler until your eyes "break apart" or until you say you see double.

Accommodation is graded on diopters for a certain age and is usually no big deal.

If your PC is above 100...they do two or three more measuremnts over a 2/3 day period and take the best score...again usually no big deal.

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Who is "they'?

PRK and LASIK are approved CRS proceedures for pilot applicants. PRK does take a little longer to heal intitially but it also doesn't leave a "flap". LASIK is usually the only option left for applicants in the higher refractive error range...both will require a full year of healing before you can be cleared by Brooks.

The decision is yours...but the info you are getting from "they" is bu!!$%!#...

That is exactly what I thought. "They" is USAF Refractive Surgery Registry Websit

I don't really want to deal with fighting it anymore if the only benefit to LASIK is less pain. I just wanted to make sure that there aren't specific requirements for LASIK that I did not meet. I don't want to sound like an idiot if I decide to fight to get LASIK.

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Guest Miclhstrase

I sure hope all you knowledgeable people aren't tired of answering questions yet!

I saw my eye doctor today as I was worried my vision had deteriorated since the last time I saw him.

Here are the prescription results:

sphere cylindrical

right eye: -1.00 |

left eye : -0.50 | - 0.25

I understand these results are within the allowed limits, but I don't know about my visual acuity. I asked the doc, and he said 20/25. However, I think he may have been talking about something else, but what?

Based on what lines I could read on the chart, I'd say my acuity is somewhere around these limits:

right eye: 20/50-20/60

left eye : 20/30-20/50

Finally, what can I do to prevent any further deterioration of my vision? Should I be wearing my prescription all the time (it says so on the prescription slip)? Previously I was only wearing my glasses during lectures and for night driving. I don't know if this hard on the eyes or not. I was worried if I always wore my glasses, my eyes would slowly adjust to the sharper image, and somehow make my vision worse.

Thanks for any feedback!

- Bryan

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Guest P27:17
I sure hope all you knowledgeable people aren't tired of answering questions yet!

I saw my eye doctor today as I was worried my vision had deteriorated since the last time I saw him.

Here are the prescription results:

sphere cylindrical

right eye: -1.00 |

left eye : -0.50 | - 0.25

I understand these results are within the allowed limits, but I don't know about my visual acuity. I asked the doc, and he said 20/25. However, I think he may have been talking about something else, but what?

Based on what lines I could read on the chart, I'd say my acuity is somewhere around these limits:

right eye: 20/50-20/60

left eye : 20/30-20/50

Finally, what can I do to prevent any further deterioration of my vision? Should I be wearing my prescription all the time (it says so on the prescription slip)? Previously I was only wearing my glasses during lectures and for night driving. I don't know if this hard on the eyes or not. I was worried if I always wore my glasses, my eyes would slowly adjust to the sharper image, and somehow make my vision worse.

Thanks for any feedback!

- Bryan

From what I read here you won't need a waiver...you will have to wear you glasses for flying so why not get used to them.

If your eyes get worse that's a natural progression...not too much you can do about it.

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Guest kev110382

Ok, I've got a question about the waiver possibilities for me...

I had LASIK done in Oct 04 while I was enlisted at Travis AFB. My eyes were absolutely horrible pre-op (verbatim from the report):

Eye: OD VA-sc: 20/400 VA-cc: 20/20

Keratometer: K1: 45.12 D K2: 43.50 D K2 Axis: 10 deg

Manifest Refraction: -8.25 DS +0.75 DC x 120deg 12.50mm

Cycloplegic Refract: -7.50 DS +0.75 DC x 120deg 12.50mm

Eye: OS VA-sc: 20/400 VA-cc: 20/20

Keratometer: K1: 45.25 D K2: 44.37 D K2 Axis: 8 deg

Manifest Refraction: -7.50 DS +0.50 DC x 110deg 12.50mm

Cycloplegic Refract: -7.00 DS +0.25 DC x 110deg 12.50mm

So I understand that the cycloplegic refraction is what they look at and the limits are now -8.00 diopters. Getting through the DODMERB to even get to where I am today was a major ordeal- I was DQed from military service even though the AF did the LASIK on me. After some thinly veiled threats from my Col, they reexamined everything and said I was good to go and pilot qualified. Both of my eyes are near perfect now- no halos, night issues, depth perception issues, or anything else I know of.

So my question is, after years of being told I have no chance in hell of being an AF pilot because of my eyes, do I now have a chance? Or am I still screwed as I've come to expect?

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I sure hope all you knowledgeable people aren't tired of answering questions yet!

I saw my eye doctor today as I was worried my vision had deteriorated since the last time I saw him.

Here are the prescription results:

sphere cylindrical

right eye: -1.00 |

left eye : -0.50 | - 0.25

I understand these results are within the allowed limits, but I don't know about my visual acuity. I asked the doc, and he said 20/25. However, I think he may have been talking about something else, but what?

Based on what lines I could read on the chart, I'd say my acuity is somewhere around these limits:

right eye: 20/50-20/60

left eye : 20/30-20/50

Finally, what can I do to prevent any further deterioration of my vision? Should I be wearing my prescription all the time (it says so on the prescription slip)? Previously I was only wearing my glasses during lectures and for night driving. I don't know if this hard on the eyes or not. I was worried if I always wore my glasses, my eyes would slowly adjust to the sharper image, and somehow make my vision worse.

Thanks for any feedback!

- Bryan

No doctor, but here's what mine told me.

-Drink plenty of water

-Get good sleep

-Wear sunglasses when out in the sun

-Try to use LCD screens for your computer monitors and don't sit to close

I don't wear glasses but had a buddy that did until he realized he wanted to be a pilot. He threw them away and hasn't worn them since (well when I knew him). From what I remember, his eyes are better. No Lasik or PRK either.

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Guest PUTOPIAD

hey guys,

a couple of months ago i was seeing some extra floaters and some halos around lights, so i went my eye doc and he said everything looked fine and that there didnt seem to be a problem. anyway, since then the floaters havent been nearly as annoying and the halos have completely gone away. i was wondering if having the halos in my record would dq me. any insight would be great.

thanks guys

P

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Guest IFR_pilot

Ok so im sure the answer to this question has been answered in the 4 pages of this topic but from what I searched I couldn't really find a for sure answer. I'm sorry but I'm new on here.

I wear contacts and I don't have my complete prescription with me. All I have is the number on my box which I'm guessing is the refractive error? My right eye says -1.75 and my Left eye says -1.50. Are these the numbers that are supposed to fit into the refractive error limits? If so then from what I understand is that my left eye is right on the border for a pilot and my right eye is outside the limit. I'm also understanding that I am well within the waiverable range, right?

Am I using the right numbers? Is my vision good enough that I don't really need to worry excessively? I'm quite ignorant to the situation and I knew that someone on here would be able to help. I'm very sorry if this has been discussed repeatedly and feel free to gripe at me and give me advice to better navigate. Thanks

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Guest P27:17
Ok so im sure the answer to this question has been answered in the 4 pages of this topic but from what I searched I couldn't really find a for sure answer. I'm sorry but I'm new on here.

I wear contacts and I don't have my complete prescription with me. All I have is the number on my box which I'm guessing is the refractive error? My right eye says -1.75 and my Left eye says -1.50. Are these the numbers that are supposed to fit into the refractive error limits? If so then from what I understand is that my left eye is right on the border for a pilot and my right eye is outside the limit. I'm also understanding that I am well within the waiverable range, right?

Am I using the right numbers? Is my vision good enough that I don't really need to worry excessively? I'm quite ignorant to the situation and I knew that someone on here would be able to help. I'm very sorry if this has been discussed repeatedly and feel free to gripe at me and give me advice to better navigate. Thanks

The key to qualifying/non-qualifying refractive errors is they type of refraction being used...we only look at cycloplegic refractions...where drops are placed in the eyes to dilate the pupils...the optometrist then examines and gets a true refraction. Many civilian and some military go for the "best corrected" refraction which give higher numbers...so if you are corrected to say 20/15 via cyclo the numbers will be higher than if they were only corrected to 20/20 (which is the AF pilot standard).

Now let's assume the numbers you posted were by cyclo (which I don't think they are), you would be slightly over the limit in your right eye and would require a waiver...which if everything else in ok, would be very easy to get.

Nothing to sweat about...just get a cyclo done and you'll know for sure..

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The key to qualifying/non-qualifying refractive errors is they type of refraction being used...we only look at cycloplegic refractions...where drops are placed in the eyes to dilate the pupils...the optometrist then examines and gets a true refraction. Many civilian and some military go for the "best corrected" refraction which give higher numbers...so if you are corrected to say 20/15 via cyclo the numbers will be higher than if they were only corrected to 20/20 (which is the AF pilot standard).

Now let's assume the numbers you posted were by cyclo (which I don't think they are), you would be slightly over the limit in your right eye and would require a waiver...which if everything else in ok, would be very easy to get.

Nothing to sweat about...just get a cyclo done and you'll know for sure..

My eyes are about the exact same - although my eye doc was an opthamologist and I believe he used the eye drops before he took my refraction measurements... so to confirm; would the results he gave me be on par with how it will be done during my FC1? Sorry if it's a dumb and repetitive question.... just am nervous about getting a waiver, that's all!

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Guest goducks
My eyes are about the exact same - although my eye doc was an opthamologist and I believe he used the eye drops before he took my refraction measurements... so to confirm; would the results he gave me be on par with how it will be done during my FC1? Sorry if it's a dumb and repetitive question.... just am nervous about getting a waiver, that's all!

dml,

I don't know who you're comparing yourself to when you say your eyes are about the same. There were a couple of different posts in this thread. But, to answer your question..yes, if your doc put drops in your eyes then did the refraction, that is very similar to the way Brooks does it. As P27 says, Brooks only goes until you can read 20/20. They don't continue to push lenses to make it better past that point, which is in your favor. Bottom line is that you can't be over -3.00. Anything within that range will be within standard or waiverable. If you are close, the guys at Brooks will do anything they can to make you waiverable.

Ok, I've got a question about the waiver possibilities for me...

I had LASIK done in Oct 04 while I was enlisted at Travis AFB. My eyes were absolutely horrible pre-op (verbatim from the report):

So my question is, after years of being told I have no chance in hell of being an AF pilot because of my eyes, do I now have a chance? Or am I still screwed as I've come to expect?

Kev,

Don't know if your question got answered or not. Just in case, here it goes. If your cyclos are correct, you indeed would be eligible per new policy that went into effect last May. There is a caveat in the policy, however, that you should be aware of. Anyone in the -5.50 to -8.00 range must have no evidence of retinal degeneration (an example would be lattice degeneration). Part of the decision to raise the pre-op limit was to not allow high myopes (above -5.50) with retinal degeneration to be waivered because of the increased risk of progression to a more serious propblem such as a retinal detachment that is associated with high myopia. If you are clean in that regard, then you just need to get a refractive surgery waiver like everyone else. That entails passing a few extra vision tests at Brooks that about 98-99% of the people pass.

Edited by goducks

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dml,

I don't know who you're comparing yourself to when you say your eyes are about the same. There were a couple of different posts in this thread. But, to answer your question..yes, if your doc put drops in your eyes then did the refraction, that is very similar to the way Brooks does it. As P27 says, Brooks only goes until you can read 20/20. They don't continue to push lenses to make it better past that point, which is in your favor. Bottom line is that you can't be over -3.00. Anything within that range will be within standard or waiverable. If you are close, the guys at Brooks will do anything they can to make you waiverable.

Sorry, I meant that my eyes are also around the -1.75 / -1.50 range. Actually, I just called my opthamologist and they said my refractions are -1.50 and -1.25 in my right and left eyes, respectively, as of my latest exam in April. I asked if the refraction was a cycloplegic refraction and they said no - they do dilate your eyes before taking the refractions but do not use the cyclo gel. Could it be possible that my refractions would be worse had they used cyclo gel instead of the normal dilating eyedrops that optometrists/opthamologists use?

EDIT: I will be going in for my initial FC1 - will my eligibility for a waiver matter with it being my initial physical or not?

Edited by dml02b

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Guest goducks
Sorry, I meant that my eyes are also around the -1.75 / -1.50 range. Actually, I just called my opthamologist and they said my refractions are -1.50 and -1.25 in my right and left eyes, respectively, as of my latest exam in April. I asked if the refraction was a cycloplegic refraction and they said no - they do dilate your eyes before taking the refractions but do not use the cyclo gel. Could it be possible that my refractions would be worse had they used cyclo gel instead of the normal dilating eyedrops that optometrists/opthamologists use?

EDIT: I will be going in for my initial FC1 - will my eligibility for a waiver matter with it being my initial physical or not?

You will be fine- won't even need a waiver unless things get a lot worse. Cyclopentolate (Cyclogel is the brand name) won't change your numbers much if at all, but will keep your eyes dilated longer. It's really only important for hyperopes (those people whose Rx is +). You will obviously need corrective lenses to fly, but that's not unusual these days.

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Guest P27:17
I know the standards say your vision can be as bad 20/70 and correctable to 20/20. However, do you have to be "corrected" to 20/20 at the time of the physical or do you just have to be "correctable" to 20/20. I currently am 20/25 in both eyes and therefore don't need to hassle with contacts to get through the day. I just don't want to get to my FC1 and be DQ'd because I'm not "corrected" to 20/20 when my eyes are easily "correctable" to 20/20. Hope that all makes sense. Thanks for your help!

Correct-ABLE...don't sweat it...they'll either put temporary lenses on you and/or read it during the cycloplegic.

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Guest P27:17
Thanks for the response man. I figured that was the case, just wanted to be sure. So once they determine your correction they'll line you out on the proper contacts?

I wouldn't count on a contact lens Rx during your FCI exam...they will give you a "manifest" that can be used for eyeglasses.

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So I had another refraction exam in December at my civ optometrist (eyes were not dilated) and my prescription is something like:

Right: -1.50

Left: -1.25 +.50 (astigmatism)

I go to Sheppard on the 29th for my iFC1 and am curious how the waiver process works. I'm thinking that I may need one for my distant vision in my right eye (when it gets dilated I'm sure they'll be more like -1.75). But, will I need one for my +.50 astigmatism as well? Assuming that nothing else is wrong with my eyes (no color/OVT/red lense issues), how likely will it be that I can get a waiver?

Sorry to keep posting in this thread but as my future career rides on it - it's a big deal to me :).

Thanks in advance!

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Flight Docs,

I had my IFC1 yesterday at Robins AFB. I was selected for a pilot slot on the 09ot01 OTS boards. My vision was as follows and I am wondering how I am looking for a excessive refraction waiver.

Refraction:

Left: +050 -2.75x95

Right: +025 -2.25x70

Acuity:

Distance: 20/40 correctable to 20/20

Near: 20/25 correctable to 20/20

I was suprised because this was the first time I have ever had a (+) number in my prescription. Thanks for your help.

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Guest goducks
So I had another refraction exam in December at my civ optometrist (eyes were not dilated) and my prescription is something like:

Right: -1.50

Left: -1.25 +.50 (astigmatism)

I go to Sheppard on the 29th for my iFC1 and am curious how the waiver process works. I'm thinking that I may need one for my distant vision in my right eye (when it gets dilated I'm sure they'll be more like -1.75). But, will I need one for my +.50 astigmatism as well? Assuming that nothing else is wrong with my eyes (no color/OVT/red lense issues), how likely will it be that I can get a waiver?

Sorry to keep posting in this thread but as my future career rides on it - it's a big deal to me :).

Thanks in advance!

dml,

Based on the numbers you quote, you should not need a waiver for your refractive error. A cycloplegic (dilated) refraction should be slightly less than your Rx from your civ optometrist. So, unless something changes for the worse you should meet vision standards. There's also the 20/70 uncorrected acuity requirement, but you should be able to meet that on the OVT, which is the official vision screener used by the USAF. The astigmatism in the left eye is a non-issue. You can have up to 1.50 D.

Flight Docs,

I had my IFC1 yesterday at Robins AFB. I was selected for a pilot slot on the 09ot01 OTS boards. My vision was as follows and I am wondering how I am looking for a excessive refraction waiver.

Refraction:

Left: +050 -2.75x95

Right: +025 -2.25x70

Acuity:

Distance: 20/40 correctable to 20/20

Near: 20/25 correctable to 20/20

I was suprised because this was the first time I have ever had a (+) number in my prescription. Thanks for your help.

cf320i,

You will need a waiver for excessive astigmatism as the standard is 1.50 D. This waiver is granted if there are no indications of corneal degeneration on corneal topography (e.g. keratoconus) and your vision is fully correctable to normal levels. Brooks has a small battery of tests that are used to judge whether this is the case (this will happen when you go for your MFS screening). Obviously, you will need to use correction when taking these tests. Do you currently wear glasses or contacts? If you do not have a good pair of glasses, get one. You will not be allowed to use contacts at Brooks. If you do not bring glasses to Brooks, a temporary set can be fabricated, however, these would be optically inferior to your true prescription. Note that this isn't always the case. Some types of eyeglass prescriptions are trivial and a temporary set can be just as good as a permanent set. Due to the high amount of astigmatism in your Rx, however, this is not the case. You will want to have glasses that are spot on and that you are fully adapted to wearing.

As far as the (+) numbers in your Rx...they are relatively meaningless and nothing to worry about.

GD

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dml,

Based on the numbers you quote, you should not need a waiver for your refractive error. A cycloplegic (dilated) refraction should be slightly less than your Rx from your civ optometrist.

I though that having dilated eyes made your presricption a little worse; not better? Or are you talking about my prescription from my optometrist being a touch stronger thus allowing me to see better than 20/20? (I think this is my prescription at 20/20 though...)

So, unless something changes for the worse you should meet vision standards. There's also the 20/70 uncorrected acuity requirement, but you should be able to meet that on the OVT, which is the official vision screener used by the USAF.

That is what I'm also concerned about - the 20/70 standard. If I don't meet that can it be waived? And if so, up to what acuity mark? I'm also a little confused as to how my visual acuity can be measured on the OVT - I thought that was for depth perception? Please correct me if I'm wrong.

The astigmatism in the left eye is a non-issue. You can have up to 1.50 D.

Sweet.

Thanks again in advance!

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cf320i,

You will need a waiver for excessive astigmatism as the standard is 1.50 D. This waiver is granted if there are no indications of corneal degeneration on corneal topography (e.g. keratoconus) and your vision is fully correctable to normal levels. Brooks has a small battery of tests that are used to judge whether this is the case (this will happen when you go for your MFS screening). Obviously, you will need to use correction when taking these tests. Do you currently wear glasses or contacts? If you do not have a good pair of glasses, get one. You will not be allowed to use contacts at Brooks. If you do not bring glasses to Brooks, a temporary set can be fabricated, however, these would be optically inferior to your true prescription. Note that this isn't always the case. Some types of eyeglass prescriptions are trivial and a temporary set can be just as good as a permanent set. Due to the high amount of astigmatism in your Rx, however, this is not the case. You will want to have glasses that are spot on and that you are fully adapted to wearing.

As far as the (+) numbers in your Rx...they are relatively meaningless and nothing to worry about.

GD

Go Ducks,

Thanks for the response! I do have a current pair of glasses that I brought to my FC1 and that I can bring to Brooks for my MFS screening. Would you recommend I go to a civ eye doctor to find out if I have any indications of corneal degeneration? Also, is a waiver granted for excessive astigmatism the same as it is for excessive refraction? That is up to -3.00 diopters, meaning I am within waiverable limits?? The doc at Robins told me my eyes looked great other than the astigmatism. Thanks again for your help.

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Guest goducks
I though that having dilated eyes made your presricption a little worse; not better? Or are you talking about my prescription from my optometrist being a touch stronger thus allowing me to see better than 20/20? (I think this is my prescription at 20/20 though...)

That is what I'm also concerned about - the 20/70 standard. If I don't meet that can it be waived? And if so, up to what acuity mark? I'm also a little confused as to how my visual acuity can be measured on the OVT - I thought that was for depth perception? Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Sweet.

Thanks again in advance!

dlm,

A cycloplegic refraction for someone who is near-sighted (such as yourself) will typically be slightly less power than the manifest (non-dilated) refraction. The opposite is true for someone who is far-sighted. Furthermore, the qualifying lens power for your FCI is the amount of lens needed to get you to 20/20 and no better. This will nearly always be less than your glasses prescription as the doc will try to find the lens that gives you your best vision, eg. 20/15.

20/70 is the standard. If you are 20/70 or better, you meet standards. If you are worse than 20/70, but 20/200 or better you are waiverable (and these waivers are basically a formality). If you are worse than 20/200 then it's time for PRK or LASIK. Relax, you will likely meet standard, or worst case need a routine waiver. The OVT is an all-in-one screener that does distant and near acuities, depth perception, phorias, etc. It's a small table top device that uses lenses to simulate the test distance. You'll get to know it very well if you fly for the USAF.

GD

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Guest goducks
Go Ducks,

Thanks for the response! I do have a current pair of glasses that I brought to my FC1 and that I can bring to Brooks for my MFS screening. Would you recommend I go to a civ eye doctor to find out if I have any indications of corneal degeneration? Also, is a waiver granted for excessive astigmatism the same as it is for excessive refraction? That is up to -3.00 diopters, meaning I am within waiverable limits?? The doc at Robins told me my eyes looked great other than the astigmatism. Thanks again for your help.

Definitely bring the glasses. I would also recommend wearing them fairly routinely prior to going to Brooks so you are accustomed to the view you get through them. Sometimes glasses for higher amounts of astigmatism will cause you to feel everything is distorted if you rarely wear them. There is often an adaptation period.

There are two things that Brooks will look at regarding your waiver. The most important is that your corneal topography is normal. Robins optometry clinic has a topography device (it will print out a colored map of the cornea). If they did a topography and found it to be normal, then that's good. If they didn't, then there's no way to know. Looking at the eyes through a microscope won't tell you anything about early forms of degeneration. The second thing that Brooks will look at is whether your eyes are capable of seeing normally when using corrective lenses. The concern is that people who have higher amounts of astigmatism, but don't have any significant near-sightedness, will often go throughout their life without using corrective lenses. These people usually see OK (20/25 to 20/40 without corrective lenses) so they don't usually feel the need to wear lenses. However, the retina is not getting a sharp image and, consequently, the brain will not be motivated to develop the full network of fibers that are usually dedicated to vision. Hence, after a decade or two of life, glasses will help, but the vision is still not as good as it could be. I've seen many cases like this and we can do tests that show it's real, but the bottom line is that the problem is rarely significant enough to warrant a DQ. If you're correctable to 20/20 and the few additional tests that Brooks will perform don't show anything really out of the ordinary, then a waiver is likely. I think I can recall one DQ for this condition in the last five years.

Finally, 3.00 D is the waiverable limit (there is no waiver above 3.00, period). The docs can play around with the dials to try and keep you at -3.00 or less by adjusting other aspects of you prescription. So unless your eyes change, you should be OK there. Just be ready for a little more vision testing and some additional attention by the docs at Brooks, but it's all part of the waiver process.

GD

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However, the retina is not getting a sharp image and, consequently, the brain will not be motivated to develop the full network of fibers that are usually dedicated to vision. Hence, after a decade or two of life, glasses will help, but the vision is still not as good as it could be.

Thanks GD your wisdom/time is much appreciated. Would wearing my glasses more reqularly help prevent the scenario you described?

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