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General field training info

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I'm dragging this old thread up...

The sister in law found out today that she's going to be retained and will keep her scholarship, or get her scholarship back, rather, as I believe that it went away while she was in limbo. I know nobody actually cares about her personally, but some may find it interesting that such a thing is possible.

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I'm on FTP staff... CTA at M4 this summer, so I have a little bit more info here:

1) I have seen a powerpoint slide my COC has from HQ on the new plan and it did propose "Expeditionary Training" and "Expeditionary Training Units" (instead of our FTUs)

2) It will all be at Maxwell.... 6 encampments though.

3) I think they're shortening it by 2 days to 26, plus the travel day on each side.

4) Half of it will be in-garrison in the OTS complex. The second half will be expeditionary skills training. 5 or 6 days will be spent at an on-base deployment location. Then the rest of the time will be a "possible off-base deployment." This is according to the SE Region CC. There is also the possibility of airlift to the "undisclosed deployment location." Then, they'll return to OTS complex for 1 or 2 days before leaving for good.

5) Everything is ready to go at Ellsworth just incase the plan falls through, and HQ has to revert to the old way.

6) I was also told there are no more SQ CTAs anymore. I remember Maj Gen Flowers telling us last yr at M3 that he wanted fewer CTAs too.

I know it sucks that we don't have new FTMs yet, but if you learn leadership you'll be ok. And with the IDEs, they were such a minor part of your FTPR to begin with, it shouldn't matter how gay that are or not (even though they are). They're like 1/5 of one of like 40-some parts of the FTPR.... not a big deal at all.

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Just talked to the Southeast Region Commander yesterday. Here is a brief summary of FT 2008:

2 weeks in garrison at Maxwell doing the usual FT type stuff.

2 weeks at Maxwell at tent city doing Expeditionary type stuff.

Possibly 3 or 4 days at a remote location. Possibly transported there by airlift.

New FTMs are almost done.

That's straight from HQ.

As for preparing, none of this changes how you should prepare. Get in shape, learn the FTM (they don't change that much through the years), and practice some GLPs. The more you prepare for before you leave, the less stressful FT. There is so much that is in your control, make sure you are prepared in those areas.

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Guest ASUcadet

FT was a joke. They have 28 days to analyze the leadership of 20 cadets, so what do they do? They put us at attention, make us stand around for about ten hours a day, then periodically march us from the dining hall to the dorms and back, and complain about how they don't have enough time to evaluate our leadership skills. If you know your left from your right and if you can direct a group of people down the same street you've marched down for the last 20 days, then you have what it takes to lead the AF in combat. Good on you.

I think "garrison" was the downfall of FT. It doesn't have anything to do with leading, but for some reason, it's all we did for an entire month. In fact, I have a theory that the dumber you are the easier it is to stand there and just look at the back of someone's head for hours on end. And even if you're the FLT/CC, then what "leadership" skills are being exhibited while marching your flight around? You're telling people what to do and they have to unconditionally follow your orders no matter how much they love/despise you. Sure, it's great to see how you perform under pressure, but every single day for an entire month? YGBSM.

Hopefully they're taking a step in the right direction, because FT is long overdue for an overhaul. If you spend two weeks in the field then odds are your leadership will count for much more, so get your hands on the AES 300 book and memorize the "scorecard" on the back page of the FTM when you get it, because that's what you'll be graded on.

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Here are a few other things that have changed:

they'll get issued camelbacks instead of canteens and web belts... (good idea)

They'll be released the morning of TD-27 (so, it's 2 days shorter)

They can only bring their carry-on and their issued duffle-bag (no other luggage authorized)

As said before, they travel in SS Blues with boots, so they can't bring any civvies

no SQ CTAs

CTAs can't fill out 341s (i think that'll help with unstandardized training some...)

Leadership positions rotate 5 days instead of weekly

They have to bring 2 mouthguards that are already boiled and formed (hand-to-hand combat training???)

There's only one PFA on TD-4... so you better pass that one.

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Take a look at this article. Look like we'll be going to Miss. for 6 days.

"In addition to the move, officials are revamping the training curriculum to incorporate 11 days of training at Maxwell AFB's Officer Training School, six days at Maxwell's Blue Thunder Training Complex, and six days at the Joint Force Training Center in Hattiesburg, Miss."

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123084531

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Chapter 8 Para 1.

b. When Meals Ready to Eat (MREs) or box meals are offered in lieu of the standard meal, all items in the MRE or box lunch are authorized for consumption.

For you cadets going this year, avoid the omelet at all costs. But I have to say, you kids get it easy, no checking to see who ate their M&Ms or finding candy wrappers in the port-a-johns after meals.

I guess this how we prevent integrity problems :bash:

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From the AF website

Officials move ROTC field training to Maxwell

by Carl Bergquist

Air University Public Affairs

2/1/2008 - MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. (AFPN) -- Air Force officials here recently announced all ROTC field training is moving to Maxwell Air Force Base beginning the summer of 2008.

Last summer's ROTC schedule included three encampments here and three encampments at Ellsworth AFB, S.D., but this year will mark the first time all encampments will take place at one location.

In addition to the move, officials are revamping the training curriculum to incorporate 11 days of training at Maxwell AFB's Officer Training School, six days at Maxwell's Blue Thunder Training Complex, and six days at the Joint Force Training Center in Hattiesburg, Miss.

Instructors will conduct primarily in-class instruction at the OTS portion, but training at the Blue Thunder complex and JFTC involves extensive deployment and expeditionary training in response to Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. T Michael Moseley's desire to instill a strong "warrior ethos" mindset among Airmen.

"Our biggest challenge is getting airlift support to take cadets to the JFTC," said Maj. John Carros, the Air Force ROTC chief of training. "We have a commitment from the 908th Airlift Wing at Maxwell AFB, but we are also working with the Air Force Reserve to get additional commitments from other air mobility units."

Lt. Col. Guy Parker, the ROTC Director of Operations, said he and Army Col. Earnest Shows, the JFTC commander, are looking forward to building a long-term partnership to benefit Air Force ROTC and its training program.

Training capabilities at the JFTC include four forward operating bases, simulated Southwest Asian cities, a C-130 Hercules runway and C-17 Globemaster III assault strip, live-fire weapons ranges, convoy operation areas, a land navigation course and base defense training areas.

"We are leveraging their expertise for our cadets, and some of the most current lessons from the war can be learned at the JFTC facility," Colonel Parker said.

Other obstacles cadre members are overcoming include plans for adverse weather; medical support; and a lack of dormitory space, Major Carros said. While dormitory-expansion plans are in the works, cadre members developed overlapping encampments to provide adequate living quarters for incoming cadets. As a result, six field training classes will overlap during this summer's encampments.

The plan is a "temporary, tactical solution to a strategic problem," Colonel Parker said.

A cadre of more than 70 people will run each encampment, with O-6s filling the commander and vice commander positions. Air Force leaders said they consider the transformation as the most significant change to Air Force ROTC training in the last 60 years.

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Guest GFYHUA?

OK. Here's the real deal on CTA's at camp. I just read the official briefings....whatever y'all heard at Chicon or whatever else is slightly mistaken.

-Fact: CTA's rooms will be kept in an orderly fashion. That means no clothes all over the floor (that's what a laundry bag is for). There is no inspection or anything for CTAs so whoever said that is full of crap.

-Fact: CTA's will walk two abreast and in step when transiting around OTS campus. That means you look professional when you are going around the OTS areas of Maxwell, just like OTS would. This isn't like you are completely locked on from what I got out of the text. Once again, you are simply being professional around the Officer training area. Remember, CTAs are cadets still. There are officers at OTS that have to do the same thing. CTAs just have to be at higher standards. When off base, there is no more two abreast or in step stuff.

CTAs are going to be trainers this year. "Cadet TRAINING Assistant". You are there to help train and evaluate. Leave the pant-shitting-yelling to the TI. You can still yell if the time calls for it. But basically you are not there to stress the crap out of a cadet, literally.

Overall, it looks fun! The FTPs are in for a trip :thumbsup: CTAs will also have a kick ass time.

Anymore BS rumors I can attempt to make clear?

Edited by GFYHUA?

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Guest kev110382

What are the guidelines for going to regular vs. extended field training? I read somewhere that prior-enlisted could go to the regular FT even if they joined their Det. at the last minute.

Basically, I was recently that I'll have to go the extended since I didn't join as a Freshman but I'm PS AF. Initially, they told me I would go to the regular as the extended teaches you how to wear a uniform, basic military history, etc which I would already know.

Anyone know?

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Hate to bust any bubbles but the day you arrive is the day you start. TD0 is one of the most intense days of camp.

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Yeah the first day sucked as well as the first two mornings you wake up. After that the shock factor is pretty much gone. They try and bring back the shock by doing some gay stuff, but it just really doesn't work. In fact, you might even laugh at their attempts, I did and got to talk to my "new" FTO about laughing in my room with my roommate. Ha ha good times.

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Guest 055-NOS
Any post-CTA's or 300 cadets have any last minute insight? tips?

Don't lose any sleep over it - people make it out to be a way bigger deal than it is. It sucks but its not hard one bit - the only dudes who get washed out probably shouldn't have made it to field training in the first place.

Tips:

1. Make a name for yourself and make sure the CTAs and FTO know who you are by the end of Day-1.

2. Be ballzy - its better to put yourself out there and f'up then to be a stealth cadet - this goes hand in hand with "1".

3. Positive mental attitude - hang out with other positive people, don't bitch at all (not once! because before you know it you'll be just another loser with a bad attitude), have fun with it!

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I'll add to the list.

4. Volunteer for stuff. If you f' it up learn from the experience and take what you have learned to make you a better cadet.

5. Help your peers. Start by helping your roommate then when you have your stuff ready go help your flight and squadron. Take personal interesting seeing the squadron succeed. The faster you can move from being focussed on the individual to the squadron working together the better life will be for you and your squadron mates.

Good luck to all of you being the guinea pigs this year.

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Guest ASUcadet
Don't lose any sleep over it - people make it out to be a way bigger deal than it is. It sucks but its not hard one bit - the only dudes who get washed out probably shouldn't have made it to field training in the first place.

Tips:

1. Make a name for yourself and make sure the CTAs and FTO know who you are by the end of Day-1.

2. Be ballzy - its better to put yourself out there and f'up then to be a stealth cadet - this goes hand in hand with "1".

3. Positive mental attitude - hang out with other positive people, don't bitch at all (not once! because before you know it you'll be just another loser with a bad attitude), have fun with it!

That's exactly what I did and I ended up with middle third (I definitely had my flaws though). Our Top Gun was really ballsy and our DG was a stealth cadet. It all depends on the individual circumstances you're put in and the leadership that evaluates you. I pissed off the CTAs because the group CC and I made our own schedule when they didn't give us one. And, of course, I volunteered to march my squadron to chow first, since I suggested the idea to the Group CC. Some FTOs might've seen that as initiative, but I think mine saw it as undermining authority and the CTAs definitely thought I was undermining them. I should've read my leadership better and figured out how far I could push things though.

Personally, I never got flustered at FT, but my FTO told me that it kinda counted against me because they never saw me at my breaking point, so I think a big factor is that they want to see personal growth. Also, FT is based on a point scale, and you don't get any points for taking care of your team (which sends the wrong message, IMO). For example, the guy who was SQ/CC right after me told everyone (in front of CTAs and FTOs) to get as little food as possible to save time so that we could make an impossible suspense immediately after chow. This was after three cadets in our SQ had already collapsed from exhaustion. He ended up with SP because the points worked in his favor, even though I'm sure the leadership thought he was a Dbag (and it wasn't the only cheap thing he did). In general, I think FTOs know who should be #1 and who should be last, but everyone else just kinda ends up wherever depending on the points. So whether they love you or hate you, you get evaluated on how well you perform specific actions in whatever job you get (reveille, parades, marching, etc) as opposed to individual circumstances and leadership... or at least, that's how our squadron was.

In my experience, I think the point system made it so that 'the ends justify the means' and some cadets learned that it was ok to screw over their buddy if they could get away with it. I guess the best way to do well at FT is to read the point scale on the last page of your FTM and realize that's what you'll be graded on. But don't turn into a Dbag. Personally, I'd rather lose a point or two at FT (or in any other situation), then do something that would make it hard to sleep at night. From what I've seen, the kids who screw their buddies fall pretty flat in the long run, but they still manage to take the people they screwed down a peg or two, so look out for those a$$holes. I talked to my dad about this (he did AF OTS) and he said this was prevalent back then too. But the buddy effers didn't get very far on AD when they found themselves without friends, networks, or support.

So follow the above advice, but if you don't do as well as you hoped, don't learn the wrong lessons from FT or think that AD will be like FT. Do the best job you can at whatever you do, because you'll be evaluated the same for GP/CC as toilet scrubber, know when to stand up and lead, but know when to support and follow, figure out who the good guys are (generally the vast majority), don't let yourself get rushed into making stupid decisions, and think about something either than FT right before you go to sleep, or else you'll dream about FT.

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Guest tique

going over the equipment checklist it didn't indicate to bring any clothes hangers. historically i know that cadets always had to do a BYOH type of deal, just curious if thats still the deal.

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going over the equipment checklist it didn't indicate to bring any clothes hangers. historically i know that cadets always had to do a BYOH type of deal, just curious if thats still the deal.

You don't need to bring your own hangers. You will get issued wire hangers. Some cadets brought their own hangers to M1, and then chose to store their hangers in storage rather than use them. I'm not sure their reasons, but it could have been "standardization". It is tough to keep the pants leg flush to the waist on the wire hanger (it slides) but I didn't get any demerits for it.

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-Fact: CTA's will walk two abreast and in step when transiting around OTS campus. That means you look professional when you are going around the OTS areas of Maxwell, just like OTS would. This isn't like you are completely locked on from what I got out of the text. Once again, you are simply being professional around the Officer training area. Remember, CTAs are cadets still. There are officers at OTS that have to do the same thing. CTAs just have to be at higher standards. When off base, there is no more two abreast or in step stuff.

CTAs are going to be trainers this year. "Cadet TRAINING Assistant". You are there to help train and evaluate. Leave the pant-shitting-yelling to the TI. You can still yell if the time calls for it. But basically you are not there to stress the crap out of a cadet, literally.

Sounds pretty gay to me. I'll agree there were some things that needed to be changed...and the CTA role needed some definition (as does Field Training as a whole...is it really training? Not so much...), however, having CTAs march two abreast...retarded. Last summer at one of the Maxwell encampments a CTA was yelled at in front of a flight because he told them to stop talking in formation. The Camp CC chewed his ass in front of everyone about how the cadets were supposed to be "self-correcting" and the CTA was essentially there to baby-sit. If that's the truth then it's a waste of government funds.

The CTA should be more than a yelling machine...but they should be treated more like a 3rd Lt than a cadet in that environment. They're chosen because they demonstrated some level of responsibility ahead of their peers and if they're doing their job they are working much harder than the cadets are. While I was at Maxwell I wouldn't have had time to jack around trying to find another CTA to walk from one building to another with me. UFB...

Edited by RangerMateo

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Guest tique

Question. I see a couple of people recommend bringing baby wipes to your encampment. Just wondering if they provided your dorms with toilet paper or not heh heh...that would be a pretty wicked GLP if they didn't

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Question. I see a couple of people recommend bringing baby wipes to your encampment. Just wondering if they provided your dorms with toilet paper or not heh heh...that would be a pretty wicked GLP if they didn't

Baby wipes are suggested to wipe your body clean in case you don't have time to shower. There is time scheduled each day for personal hygiene, but depending on your assigned leadership position you might choose to nix the shower to get some tasks accomplished.

Edited by USAFJosh

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Guest Johnny Appleseed

First off, congrats to the Max 1 folks. Quick question from a guy going to Max 4 in a couple of weeks... I heard a rumor that we won't be able to get a haircut while we're there (which makes sense). T/F? If it's true I guess I need to get it cut pretty tight.

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First off, congrats to the Max 1 folks. Quick question from a guy going to Max 4 in a couple of weeks... I heard a rumor that we won't be able to get a haircut while we're there (which makes sense). T/F? If it's true I guess I need to get it cut pretty tight.

We had one opportunity on the second Sunday to get a Haircut during Church or ICT but I would recommend getting it cut really short before going to avoid dealing with the hassle of getting a hair cut.

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I'm not sure if you still can or not, but I brought my own clippers with me. Seemed like every night i was cutting my own hair or someone elses in the flight/squadron. Saved us a lot of time from not going to the BX (E1).

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Guest fireplug

Is it possible to flunk out of field training?My daughter`s in Maxwell 2,she wrote me a letter saying she had a mid term evaluation and her commander said she needed to work on her nerves,(she`s the type that tries too hard sometimes).She said something about being behind and hoping to make it up at Blue Thunder.I`m afraid to pick her up from the airport now,I know she would be devesataded if she didn`t make it to POC.Any info you could give me I would appriciate.Thanks worried Mom

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If your daughter has half a brain she'll be fine. Your commander is never going to say, hey you're doing great at Field Training. Even if you're the top of your class it just doesn't happen. If she is the type who tries too hard its entirely possible that her "being behind" is more in her head than in reality. She may not get DG but honestly you have to do something really stupid to fail field training. I wouldn't sweat it if I were you.

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