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Boeing Type Rating?

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Guest troxm25

Anyone know if you recieve a Boeing type rating upon completion of the KC-135 Transition?

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Yes you do, take the form 8 from the aircraft checkride, the form 8 from the sim check ride, and a completed 8710 to your local FSDO and they'll hook you up. I did this about a month ago fwiw.

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Guest mjk5401

Did you have any trouble getting your T1 (Beech 400) and T6 stuff added (single engine instrument, commercial)? In San Antonio, all they needed was a letter from the Commander saying you completed the T1 & T6 training along with your Aeronautical Orders. Now, I'm having trouble with other FSDOs saying I need the 10 hours of PIC time.

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Guest troxm25

pc...does the type rating help with civilian employment?

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In order to fly anything with jets in the civvie world, you need a type rating. The KC135 type probably applies to the 707. Tones are just Beechjets in AF paint. Lots of options there.

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Guest gtyj98
In order to fly anything with jets in the civvie world, you need a type rating. The KC135 type probably applies to the 707. Tones are just Beechjets in AF paint. Lots of options there.

however, you don't need 'the type' to get hired by an airline/cargo outfit.

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Guest Sparky
In order to fly anything with jets in the civvie world, you need a type rating. The KC135 type probably applies to the 707. Tones are just Beechjets in AF paint. Lots of options there.

FYI..there is no "KC135" type rating, the FSDO will add only the civilian designation of the aircraft if there is an equivelant (i.e Boeing 707)

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FYI..there is no "KC135" type rating, the FSDO will add only the civilian designation of the aircraft if there is an equivelant (i.e Boeing 707)

You get a B707/B720 type rating. I am guessing it doesn't hurt with civiallian employment and would definitely look at it as a resume builder (heavy jet type ratings are always good), I have not tested that theory out yet. I personally went back to the same job that I was working at before pilot training. On the 10 hours of PIC time, I looked at that as a civillian requirement to get a type rating. I didn't have 10 hours of PIC time in the Beechjet either but you get type rated in that also. I went to the Des Moines, IA FSDO and they didn't even ask about the 10 hours.

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You get a B707/B720 type rating. I am guessing it doesn't hurt with civiallian employment and would definitely look at it as a resume builder (heavy jet type ratings are always good), I have not tested that theory out yet. I personally went back to the same job that I was working at before pilot training. On the 10 hours of PIC time, I looked at that as a civillian requirement to get a type rating. I didn't have 10 hours of PIC time in the Beechjet either but you get type rated in that also. I went to the Des Moines, IA FSDO and they didn't even ask about the 10 hours.

I also know for a fact that the FSDO in Lincoln, NE will give issue the type rating no questions asked if you have the 2 Form 8's and the 8710.

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the FSDO will add only the civilian designation of the aircraft if there is an equivelant (i.e Boeing 707)

Technically there isn't. The Boeing designation is the 717. Whether an FSDO will give you a 707 type is beyond me.

Anywords from Bergman or Scooter on this one?

HD

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Technically there isn't. The Boeing designation is the 717. Whether an FSDO will give you a 707 type is beyond me.

Anywords from Bergman or Scooter on this one?

HD

I don't believe they would give a 717 type. The 717 designator is now used for the Boeing version of the DC-9.

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FYI..there is no "KC135" type rating, the FSDO will add only the civilian designation of the aircraft if there is an equivelant (i.e Boeing 707)

Correct. I should have worded that differently.

As for the 10 hours of PIC, that doesn't make sense to me since all the aircraft we've discussed so far require 2 pilots in the civilian world (plus other crew depending on the airframe) so a type with no PIC time shouldn't matter. You still have all the experience and credentials necessary to be a right-seater, which is where most employers would start you out anyway.

And depending on who you ask, the 717 has enough differences from the DC-9 to actually be a different type. At least thats what a former Airtran exec told me. I thought the KC-135's were B-720's, but i forget what the difference between the 720 and 707 is. Whatever, its pretty minor i think.

Edited by outbreak

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Guest Sparky
Correct. I should have worded that differently.

As for the 10 hours of PIC, that doesn't make sense to me since all the aircraft we've discussed so far require 2 pilots in the civilian world (plus other crew depending on the airframe) so a type with no PIC time shouldn't matter. You still have all the experience and credentials necessary to be a right-seater, which is where most employers would start you out anyway.

And depending on who you ask, the 717 has enough differences from the DC-9 to actually be a different type. At least thats what a former Airtran exec told me. I thought the KC-135's were B-720's, but i forget what the difference between the 720 and 707 is. Whatever, its pretty minor i think.

Also, there is only a requirement for the "Captain" to be typed in the aircraft...depending on which company you work for, you may not get typed until you move over to the left seat. Of course, Southwest pilots all have types due to the requirement prior to training to acquire it on your own. Having said that, insurance is cheaper if both pilots are typed but some carriers are self-insured. One dude who is moving moving into my crash pad after the 1st of the year works for AirTran...he is a B737 first officer and doesn't have a type. The company probably does that on purpose so dudes won't leave and get hired with Southwest after acquiring a free type from the company.

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Guest Sparky
Technically there isn't. The Boeing designation is the 717. Whether an FSDO will give you a 707 type is beyond me.

Any -135 guys (pilots) on here? I could have sworn the civilian equivelant was the 707, thought a buddy of mine said that was the type he received.

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Guest Sparky
That was my point.

HD

But they would give a 707 type?

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From a -135 guy:

The type rating you get is a B-707; B-720. You are required to have 10 hours of PIC (A-code equivalent). This is from the inspector at both the Miami and OKC FSDOs. I'd look it up, but, I don't really care that much. That's the rules.

FWIW, the ratings you can get from the T-1 is the BE-400 and MU-300, and IIRC, I did need the aeronautical orders and a letter from the commander (and military competency test, as required) to get the applicable FAA ratings.

Good luck!

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Guest Boom
Any -135 guys (pilots) on here? I could have sworn the civilian equivelant was the 707, thought a buddy of mine said that was the type he received.

The KC-135 is based off the 707 however was given the 717 moniker. However it has a more narrow fuselage and is about eight inches shorter than the 707. According to some pilots at work they do receiver 707 time for the -135.

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That's what I'm wondering.

HD

I haven't bothered to get mine yet, but the licenses I have seen all say "B-707 / 720" for the type rating.

In my limited experience, the whole type rating system is a little flawed. I did some Beech 400 flying right after UPT, and to say that because I flew the T-1, I was therefore qualified for a BE-400 is a bit of a stretch. The avioncs were totally different, it had tape gauges vs. round dial, and of course reverse thrust (which was awesome....much like on the KC-135R, it totally escapes me why the Air Force didn't buy the reversers for the T-1). Having said all that, it only took .69 hours and landings for me to get signed off on the insurance for the Beech, so guess the T-1 training paid off.

I have never talked with anyone who has flown the KC-135 and a B-707 (E-8 or E-3), but I imagine they're similar. The B-707 has full leading-edge slats and slightly different wing geometery, and thus slightly slower approach speeds (~10-15 knots IIRC). I'm not sure about the flight controls (hydraulic assist?). Anyone with experience here care to chime in?

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What does a type in either the 707 or 717 really get you anyways? Not like they're flown commercially anymore. Maybe its just me, but I wouldn't think a potential employer would care much for what your type ratings are, except for those which are relevent.

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Guest Boom
What does a type in either the 707 or 717 really get you anyways?

A job over a prior -130 guy who's applying.

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A job over a prior -130 guy who's applying.

Not true. Most Herc guys show up with an L382 type rating on their certificate, equally useless on the civilian market from a fly-that-airplane standpoint. Type ratings do show however, that the individual has qualified as PIC on a transort category aircraft - a skill the airlines llove to see. (Along with UPT, it shows you're trainable.)

I was at our airline's training center today, an interviewee was in the lobby. I took a moment to wish him luck. Real nice guy; turns out he's an fighter pilot who had flown a tour or two with the his service's aerobatic demonstration team. I kind of felt bad for the guy when he found out I was an enlisted shoe-clerk type, you know he went home to his wife and told her "Jeez! Continental Airlines will hire anybody!

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What does a type in either the 707 or 717 really get you anyways? Not like they're flown commercially anymore. Maybe its just me, but I wouldn't think a potential employer would care much for what your type ratings are, except for those which are relevent.

Some cargo operators still fly 707, and Airtran has a pretty big fleet of 717's (the DC-9 type.)

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Some cargo operators still fly 707, and Airtran has a pretty big fleet of 717's (the DC-9 type.)

Omega Air flyes them. They do contract Air Refuling for the Navy.

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