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Shaft34

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Shaft34 last won the day on November 23 2018

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About Shaft34

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    Crew Dawg

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    Aerial Firefighting

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  1. AOPA did a real nice segment on CalFire Aviation this week. It’s part of the linked video. Some good in cockpit video. https://aopalive.aopa.org/?utm_source=epilot&utm_medium=email Huggy...you’ll recognize the pilot.
  2. In general, I would get away from thinking of the industry as a part-time or retirement gig, and more of a career to pursue. Sure, there are certain jobs available that fit that role, but they generally don’t pay much and are inconsistent year to year. If all you want is a little fun flying fire, then look to Air Attack jobs with any number of contractors in a 690 or King Air. The more serious, better paying jobs generally demand more dedication and time. You basically have Fed jobs (USFS & BLM), Fed contractors (Air Attack, SEAT, & Large Tankers), and State jobs (CalFire, etc). These may be year round or seasonal, but also full-time work. Its a small industry and I’ve found most opportunities are found through good old fashioned networking. That’s a tall order for a pilot coming off AD, believe me, I understand. Vets do have an advantage getting Fed jobs, so that is one way to get started. I flew a Fed Air Attack (contractor) for a few years before getting the chance to get on with CalFire (DynCorp). Met tons of people and got a good feel for the industry. The real challenge is the transition from a good paying job, to a path that may or may not work out for you. Especially with all the opportunity in the airlines right now. There is no standard path in this industry, everyone just kind of finds their way somehow. Usually hard work and sacrifice. Having a mil retirement helps ease that transition.
  3. Which SEAT contractor are you referring to? Don’t think I ever ran across any SEAT guys who were former fighter, or even AF, pilots in 3 seasons flying Fed air attack. Not that I worked with every pilot or company. Just curious really... I agree with your assessment of the lifestyle for a SEAT or Fed pilot, lots of time on the road.
  4. Shaft34

    Gun Talk

    First off, that is a very cool piece of history to inherit! You are over thinking this whole process of firearm ownership. With a few exceptions, like NYC and maybe DC, there aren’t really any restrictions on possessing a standard bolt action, centerfire rifle. Like nunya posted above, home of record means little to you right now, unless you’re storing or transporting it back to IL. According to Federal law for purpose of firearms, you are considered a resident of your PCS duty location. You didn’t say your current state, so hard to give correct info. That is where you’ll find any restrictions on storage requirements. Generally, I’d say displaying it as a wall hangar should be fine. Just some common sense with not having ammo nearby if you have kids, etc. Also, be wary of strangers, such as repair or service workers, that have access to your house and can see it. Could potentionally lead to theft. Definitely don’t let any movers take the rifle, move it yourself. A $25 rifle case from Walmart wild work well, just get one long enough. Add a couple pad locks if that makes you feel better. I am not sure of your exposure to guns in .mil, but remember it’s just a tool and mechanical device. People with limited exposure to guns often tend to assign more powers to them than those of us who use them all the time. Look up the rules of gun safety and stick to them. After all, it’s just some metal, wood, and maybe plastic designed to complete a task. I’d recommend buying yourself a decent .22 rifle like a Ruger 10/22. Learn to shoot it and have some fun!
  5. I think he stopped flying about 3-4 yrs ago and retired 2 yrs ago. Definitely a legend!
  6. Sure...here you go. I was actually in SoCal. Woolsey Fire on 11/11/18 in the West Hills area and Fox Tanker Base in Lancaster. Screen shots are from local CBS news chopper in LA. The shadow makes for an interesting image.
  7. Link to the DynCorp job posting as of 11/16/18: https://dyncorp.taleo.net/careersection/2/jobdetail.ftl?job=429005&src=JB-10060
  8. Here's an article and video The Union paper in Grass Valley did on the Air Attack Base located at the Nevada County Airport. Jake, the Battalion Chief there, talks about the program and fighting fire a bit. It also shows the loading pits and retardant reloading during a fire in the area. https://www.theunion.com/news/local-news/guardians-of-grass-valley-air-attack-firefighters-keep-nevada-county-and-beyond-safe-from-wildfire-video-photo-gallery/?fbclid=IwAR1bgRm3gVZRpUHQVvVUE2tTe4ohFvqLYCz7FNFl-Y0asCXQhrBUhuyMKCM
  9. See my post above regarding hours. I wanted to address the mention of the ANG performing the fire mission. The ANG does operate up to 6 (I think) C-130 MAFFS units when called upon during the fire season on a nation wide basis. The MAFFS is a roll on system that holds 3000 gal of retardant. It uses pressurized air to force the retardant out through a nozzle placed in the aft/left door. All the other tankers on the line (except the 747) use a gravity fed, continuous flow drop system, so there are some differences in drop pattern. The main difference is the level of certification between the MAFFS crews and your typical Tanker crew. All CalFire and most Federal contract tankers have Captains that are carded for Initial Attack (IA). This allows a captain to size up a fire, talk to ground resources, and potentially drop without any other aerial supervision over the incident. The MAFFS and VLATS (DC-10s/747) are not IA carded and require not only aerial supervision, but also a Lead Plane to drop. This is not intended to be critical, just pointing out the differences in case anyone was curious. Our program at CalFire is very focused on the Initial Attack part of fighting fire. The airplanes are dispatched like fire engines at the first smoke report. It's an aggressive and rewarding way to fight fire. NOTE: If any MAFFS pilot sees any errors in my post, please contact me and I'll change it. Just going by what I've learned talking to MAFFS guys.
  10. Here is a break down of the previously advertised times for the CalFire job Air Tactical Pilot – minimum PILOT-IN-COMMAND experience: Airplane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1800 Airplane-Multi-Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800 Of which AME: may include no more than non-centerline thrust . . . . . . . 400 Mountain (typical terrain) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Instrument (total) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Instrument (actual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Night . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 One or more of the following: Aerial firefighting (PIC or Co-Pilot). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 500 AME >6,000# . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 AME >12,500# . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 AME Turbine powered. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 That should give you an idea if you're qualified or not. Need a Commercial AMEL and 2nd Class (w/ EKG if over 40). Note that this is PIC time and not total times. I don't think these are hard minimums, but that would be individual dependent. Talking with the guys who make the decisions, it seems as if they're most interested in pilots who want to be Tanker pilots and have a broad flying background that will enable a smooth transition to flying twin engine turboprops in a challenging environment. For example, I spent about an equal 5 years of my 15 years AD in 3 airframes (T-37/F-16/U-2) and an additional 3 years flying a King Air 200 on fires and charter. I'd say each experience has provided me a solid foundation for learning to fly the S-2 as an air tanker. It's a combination of flying a heavy twin in a dynamic CAS event like it is a low and slow backcountry plane. A tactical background is a huge plus and really helps dealing with the Fire Traffic Area and environment, it's sort of like a CAS stack. Lots of visual talk on's for a drop. So, if you have the interest, think you have the flying skills, and want to do an awesome mission...this is the job for you!
  11. I live in Idaho and fly in CA for about 5 months each year. The current 6/1 schedule is a drag, but being home 24/7 for 6-7 months is nice too. That’s about 140 work days per year. The planned 12/6 schedule will be much better for people living out of state, which is actually a main reason we are moving in that direction.
  12. I agree dude! Great job, cool mission, and good group of pilots. Not for everyone, but if you’re interested hit up 78 or myself. This probably isn’t the right fit for someone building spreadsheets comparing pay at different majors. When it gets busy it is hard work, rewarding, but demanding none the less. I’m hearing they may be resume sorting next week, so anyone SERIOUSLY interested get in touch ASAP. Need availability in early Spring ‘19. Tactical flying and some multi time are pluses, even better if turboprop. Shaft
  13. Shaft34

    Gun Talk

    $299 at AIM Surplus for a LEO .40 https://www.aimsurplus.com/product.aspx?item=F1SWMP40&name=LEO+Trade-In+Smith+%26+Wesson+M%26P40+.40+S%26W+Handgun&groupid=7952
  14. Huggy, I can ask the pilots at Hemet if they’d be interested in bringing the OV-10 or S-2T over. I’m not sure how the approval process works in our organization, but I can at least ask. Being late May, Cal Fire may not allow the aircraft off base for an airshow. One of the pilots lives in Redlands, so he may be interested. Let me get back to you... SHAFT
  15. DynCorp has a couple job postings for IP positions at Sheppard (Contingent Upon Award): https://dyncorp.jobs.net/en-US/job/t-6a-instructor-pilot-ip-contingent-upon-award/J3K7YG5X2X071P7T990 https://dyncorp.jobs.net/en-US/job/t-38c-instructor-pilot-ip-contingent-upon-award/J3F52R6B01P1STF22KF Here are the mins they have posted: DI T-38C Flight Time and Experience Minimums: Flight Currency Status/Minimums: 2,000 Hours Total Flight Time 1,000 Hours in Fighter/Fighter Trainer MDS 500 hours formal course IP experience or; 3 years Instructor Pilot duties, 4-Ship Flight Lead, Designated Mission Commander in the Combat Air Force or AETC FTU or T-38C PIT/JSUPT missions 50 Flying Hours - last 12 months No mention of pay/benefits.
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