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Covid Injection Tyranny - Share and Discuss


dogfish78

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1 minute ago, bfargin said:

Sorry, didn’t mean to seem like i was questioning your word. i just thought it was gone/eradicated and nobody was still needing that shot. From more looking, it seems like it’s virtually eradicated but that there is still a slight possibility of contact in some places around the globe.

Yeah, no problem. I don't think it's common unless you're deploying to a place where it's still prevalent. 

But it is a vaccine I was required to get that carried a temporary DNIF.

I could be mistaken... doesn't even the annual flu vaccine have a verbal DNIF period? Like 12 hours or something? Or I could be thinking something else...

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1 hour ago, pawnman said:

Yeah, no problem. I don't think it's common unless you're deploying to a place where it's still prevalent. 

But it is a vaccine I was required to get that carried a temporary DNIF.

I could be mistaken... doesn't even the annual flu vaccine have a verbal DNIF period? Like 12 hours or something? Or I could be thinking something else...

Smallpox is not prevalent anywhere. It has been completely erradicated. Smallpox only exist in 2 samples in the entire world. Both are held in very high security labs, one in Russia and one on the US. Those samples by treaty are to be used for research only and not weaponization. It's unlikely you received a smallpox vaccine. You may have received a small pox test which will appear in your IMR. It's not impossible though, the military did do a few waves of immunization but most were 2002 or prior. 

The military generally had stopped immunizing for small pox because it was causing nerves with Russia. Whenever we immunized large bodies of our military, Russia believed it was because either we weaponized Smallpox and were protecting our force, or we believed they weaponized Smallpox and we were preparing to attack. Russia, knowing that Smallpox only exist in those 2 very specific samples, could not imagine another reason for immunization. To be honest they are pretty much right. 

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24 minutes ago, FLEA said:

Smallpox is not prevalent anywhere. It has been completely erradicated. Smallpox only exist in 2 samples in the entire world. Both are held in very high security labs, one in Russia and one on the US. Those samples by treaty are to be used for research only and not weaponization. It's unlikely you received a smallpox vaccine. You may have received a small pox test which will appear in your IMR. It's not impossible though, the military did do a few waves of immunization but most were 2002 or prior. 

The military generally had stopped immunizing for small pox because it was causing nerves with Russia. Whenever we immunized large bodies of our military, Russia believed it was because either we weaponized Smallpox and were protecting our force, or we believed they weaponized Smallpox and we were preparing to attack. Russia, knowing that Smallpox only exist in those 2 very specific samples, could not imagine another reason for immunization. To be honest they are pretty much right. 

I was immunized against smallpox in 2005 by the military, got the scar to prove it and it's annotated in my immunization record.

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19 minutes ago, FLEA said:

Smallpox is not prevalent anywhere. It has been completely erradicated. Smallpox only exist in 2 samples in the entire world. Both are held in very high security labs, one in Russia and one on the US. Those samples by treaty are to be used for research only and not weaponization. It's unlikely you received a smallpox vaccine. You may have received a small pox test which will appear in your IMR. It's not impossible though, the military did do a few waves of immunization but most were 2002 or prior. 

The military generally had stopped immunizing for small pox because it was causing nerves with Russia. Whenever we immunized large bodies of our military, Russia believed it was because either we weaponized Smallpox and were protecting our force, or we believed they weaponized Smallpox and we were preparing to attack. Russia, knowing that Smallpox only exist in those 2 very specific samples, could not imagine another reason for immunization. To be honest they are pretty much right. 

Oh, I 100% got vaccinated. I have the scar and everything. 

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1 hour ago, FLEA said:

It's unlikely you received a smallpox vaccine. You may have received a small pox test which will appear in your IMR. It's not impossible though, the military did do a few waves of immunization but most were 2002 or prior. 

I got the smallpox vaccine back in 2004.  A few days later it was oozing/itchy, I felt a little flu-ish, and then it scabbed over and now I have a little scar on my shoulder.

You must be a youngin’…

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4 hours ago, FLEA said:

It's unlikely you received a smallpox vaccine. You may have received a small pox test which will appear in your IMR. It's not impossible though, the military did do a few waves of immunization but most were 2002 or prior. 

 

Wrong. 2011 vaccinated.

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They were vaccinating smallpox at least until 2016. Some pog Army flight doc and his minions were running around with a list of people who had a deferment on it (usually newborns, family with eczema, etc) and trying to stick folks. Pointless. 

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5 hours ago, CaptainMorgan said:

Vaccinated in 09. I think everyone who flies AMC aircraft still gets it.


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I am pretty sure Small Pox is not a requirement for aircrew these days, mostly because the old Small Pox vaccine we've become intimately familiar with is not being produced anymore.

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I'll be honest, I need to look this up again, but there is a specific vaccine and I'm pretty sure it was smallpox, that was actually a titer test only (and is annotated as such on IMR). As mentioned before, there were political reasons to avoid vaccination. The US military has a paranoia for biological warfare though. 

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I'll be honest, I need to look this up again, but there is a specific vaccine and I'm pretty sure it was smallpox, that was actually a titer test only (and is annotated as such on IMR). As mentioned before, there were political reasons to avoid vaccination. The US military has a paranoia for biological warfare though. 


You might be thinking of chicken pox/varicella vaccine. If you had chicken pox as a kid, they do a test to check for antibodies, which if you do then exempts you from that vaccine.

I also got the smallpox vaccine in 2010 as an AMC guy.
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1 minute ago, JimNtexas said:

Does the USAF still require cholera vaccine? IIRC that was every six months.

I've never heard of anyone getting one, and I haven't had to get one for the Pacific, European, Middle Eastern, or South American theaters.  Honestly didn't know there was a vaccine for cholera.

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On 9/30/2021 at 9:53 AM, glockenspiel said:

Why did they not include any patient outcomes? We want to avoid hospitalization and death- that is the important thing, not total “cases”. I thought the purpose of the vaccine now was to reduce symptoms? 
 

PCR is not to be used as a stand alone diagnostic tool, yet it was: 
“* Case-patients were eligible for inclusion if initial infection occurred during March–December 2020, and a subsequent positive nucleic acid amplification or antigen test result was received during May–June 2021 (using date of specimen collection). Cases for analyses were restricted to persons aged ≥18 years at time of reinfection.” 
Placed have been forcing testing upon unvaccinated people much more than those vaccinated, so the total pool of positive PCR tests is likely much larger for the Unvaccinated group than the Vaccinated group. Maybe almost “2.58” times more, I don’t know, they forgot to put that in the study. 

Why is the CDC revoking approval of PCR in December? Notice that it did not mention the cycle threshold of the PCRs used in the study.

@pawnman defend Kentucky's honor. Or do you not stand with science?

Crickets on Israel study as well...

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23 minutes ago, glockenspiel said:

@pawnman defend Kentucky's honor. Or do you not stand with science?

Crickets on Israel study as well...

Well, for starters, the first line is nonsense.  If we want to arrest the pandemic, we need to reduce the spread.  Which means getting fewer people infected, so that they in turn infect fewer people.  From a "spreading Covid" standpoint, it's almost better if they end up in the hospital, because then they aren't out in grocery stores, at football games, in bars and restaurants...

I have no idea why the CDC is revoking PCR testing...but I do know that the same testing methodology was used before the study as during the study, so you're getting an apples-to-apples comparison.  If they had used a different test, Glockenspiel would have had a long rant about how the different test methods were what threw off the results.

I mean...if natural immunity is THAT good, surely there's a study somewhere that shows it?

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https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10654-021-00808-7

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Vaccines currently are the primary mitigation strategy to combat COVID-19 around the world. For instance, the narrative related to the ongoing surge of new cases in the United States (US) is argued to be driven by areas with low vaccination rates [1]. A similar narrative also has been observed in countries, such as Germany and the United Kingdom [2]. At the same time, Israel that was hailed for its swift and high rates of vaccination has also seen a substantial resurgence in COVID-19 cases [3]. We investigate the relationship between the percentage of population  fully vaccinated and new COVID-19 cases across 68 countries and across 2947 counties in the US.

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For instance, in a report released from the Ministry of Health in Israel, the effectiveness of 2 doses of the BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) vaccine against preventing COVID-19 infection was reported to be 39% [6], substantially lower than the trial efficacy of 96% [7]. It is also emerging that immunity derived from the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine may not be as strong as immunity acquired through recovery from the COVID-19 virus [8]. A substantial decline in immunity from mRNA vaccines 6-months post immunization has also been reported [9]. Even though vaccinations offers protection to individuals against severe hospitalization and death, the CDC reported an increase from 0.01 to 9% and 0 to 15.1% (between January to May 2021) in the rates of hospitalizations and deaths, respectively, amongst the fully vaccinated

 

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2 hours ago, pawnman said:

I guess I stand corrected.

 

It's okay @pawnman. We're not out against you. Everything we do here is to fight the evil they have spewed with their lying words to trap people who trust in authority figures like the CDC/FDA. I would be happy to trust that our federal government is altruistic, legal, moral, and ethical; but they're not. 

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It's okay [mention=3237]pawnman[/mention]. We're not out against you. Everything we do here is to fight the evil they have spewed with their lying words to trap people who trust in authority figures like the CDC/FDA. I would be happy to trust that our federal government is altruistic, legal, moral, and ethical; but they're not. 

Guessing he can’t see your statement unless it’s quoted because of previously mentioned blocking.
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