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Anybody have any luck getting your final separation move delayed?  Not retirement move, just when you separated from the AF for guard/reserve and needed to delay the move a bit.  I've had success for a medical deal delaying it so far (1 year), but looking through some info from TMO, I see that an AF Reg conflicts with JTR (imagine that).  Queepy now I know, but trying to figure out life things.  JTR (dated Jan 1, 2021) says for a HOR move after separation, it's possible to extend that in 180 day increments, not to exceed 6 years.  The lovely AF reg AFI24-602 (dated Oct 2020) says not to exceed 3 years.  Do I really fall under the AFI, or is there some room to maneuver with the JTR verbiage?  The JTR is newer, so that makes the AFI obsolete right?!?!  Thanks.

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Ended up going on the deployment.  Got back and min ran anything office related. Flew as much as I could to make up the hours I missed out on and now I am retired.  Missing out on 6 months of IP time

I thought the major he was responding to made much better arguments, personally. For an O-6...this guy was really lacking in his strategic planning for getting out.  I don't know what kind of McM

How did you make it 20 years in the military? 

5 hours ago, isuguy1234 said:

Anybody have any luck getting your final separation move delayed?  Not retirement move, just when you separated from the AF for guard/reserve and needed to delay the move a bit.  I've had success for a medical deal delaying it so far (1 year), but looking through some info from TMO, I see that an AF Reg conflicts with JTR (imagine that).  Queepy now I know, but trying to figure out life things.  JTR (dated Jan 1, 2021) says for a HOR move after separation, it's possible to extend that in 180 day increments, not to exceed 6 years.  The lovely AF reg AFI24-602 (dated Oct 2020) says not to exceed 3 years.  Do I really fall under the AFI, or is there some room to maneuver with the JTR verbiage?  The JTR is newer, so that makes the AFI obsolete right?!?!  Thanks.

JTR is federal law.  It trumps AFI.

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  • 4 weeks later...
9 minutes ago, MyCS said:

DON’T LEAVE THE MILITARY UNTIL “YOU” ARE THE REASON – A RETIRED AIR FORCE COLONEL

https://mtntactical.com/knowledge/dont-leave-the-military-until-you-are-the-reason-a-retired-air-force-colonel/

 

Long read...

Dude screwed up his own life and now thinks everyone should stay in the military forever?

Pass.

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13 minutes ago, MyCS said:

I couldn't finish it bro. My bad. I stopped after he moved 4 times..

 

Pretty sure he's got a huge misunderstanding of what people mean when they say "live where I want" if he thinks it means "stay in one house forever".

 

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On 2/4/2021 at 8:24 PM, mcbush said:

They usually don’t say “chief and up”, just chief. Some 2LT is going to take this advice and learn a hard lesson about the difference between rank and authority.

Saw this sorta thing on MCAS Miramar, some dude (civilian) parked in the Sergeant Major spot. Said base SgtMaj decides to take his license plate and leave a note because dude wasn’t ‘authorized’ that spot.

Same SgtMaj was singing a different tune when this dude got security forces to go visit the SgtMaj with an arrest warrant for stealing a license plate. 

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Dude screwed up his own life and now thinks everyone should stay in the military forever?
Pass.


It starts that way, but re-reading it, I took it as civilian life is different than military life, but has it's challenges as well. Also, there's bad assumptions he makes and owns, and some points that come across as whining as well that makes it a bit hard to read. The bolded titles are quotes from other articles that he's responding to (would've been helpful to label the source each time), not his headers for paragraphs.

Basically, have a plan for what you want to do when you get out, but be flexible, and find what makes you happy/gives you purpose. Also, nobody on the outside cares that you were a wg/cc, you're just another co-worker.

Didn't take away you should stay in the military forever, just to make sure you think about the transition and have realistic expectations (which he admits he didn't have and that caused him trouble).

So nothing really new... Just pretty normal advice packaged under a poorly chosen title. Guess he's also missing the exec and chief of staff to clean up his writing as well.
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Agreed if you get beyond some of the issues with the writing he makes some really valid points.

Don’t expected rainbows and mimosas everyday. Things aren’t always going to work out exactly as you expect.

Your “forever home” may not actually be what you think.

Make sure you are ready financially and mentally before you depart.

He did pick a terrible time to get out and that sucks.


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Yep,

  I'd add to be prepared for anything, and really, really learn to not care about the things you can't control.

  Spent more time in an ER this past year than all my AD time combined. 

  Work has changed dramatically with no notice.

  Definitely not staying in this house until I die, but it's still got to get fixed up.

  Outside of being near family, nothing is working out as I expected! But that's ok, I can quit/move whenever I want to.

  I don't have to get fit on the AF's timeline, or get fit at all!

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9 hours ago, MyCS said:

Have you guys ever seen a pilot withdraw their approval for retirement?

Yeah. A lot of people did that this past year due to COVID and airlines cutting hiring.

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11 hours ago, Bode said:

Agreed if you get beyond some of the issues with the writing he makes some really valid points.

Don’t expected rainbows and mimosas everyday. Things aren’t always going to work out exactly as you expect.

Your “forever home” may not actually be what you think.

Make sure you are ready financially and mentally before you depart.

He did pick a terrible time to get out and that sucks.


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I thought the major he was responding to made much better arguments, personally.

For an O-6...this guy was really lacking in his strategic planning for getting out.  I don't know what kind of McMansion he bought, but if you can't make the budget work on 75% of O-6 pay...you were always going to have problems with the transition.  Dude is making more IN RETIREMENT than most people make on Active Duty.  Hell...he's making more in retirement than I do right now.

I absolutely buy the idea that you need to plan ahead, build a cash reserve, and be prepared to expect the unexpected...but I don't buy that staying in the military for yourself is a better option than getting out because your family is tired of being dragged from duty station to duty station every 1.5-2 years.

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On 3/9/2021 at 8:47 AM, pawnman said:

I thought the major he was responding to made much better arguments, personally.

For an O-6...this guy was really lacking in his strategic planning for getting out.  I don't know what kind of McMansion he bought, but if you can't make the budget work on 75% of O-6 pay...you were always going to have problems with the transition.  Dude is making more IN RETIREMENT than most people make on Active Duty.  Hell...he's making more in retirement than I do right now.

I absolutely buy the idea that you need to plan ahead, build a cash reserve, and be prepared to expect the unexpected...but I don't buy that staying in the military for yourself is a better option than getting out because your family is tired of being dragged from duty station to duty station every 1.5-2 years.

Totally on board. There are many reasons to leave the military and one cannot specifically choose one in most cases. For myself, timing was everything, planning your exit strategy is key and you must do the best you can and always remember the best laid plans rarely if ever survive first contact. Planned a minimum of 3 years ahead, financial, medical, next career alignment, next landing pad, expected home purchase/taxes/higher cost possibilities, etc. Anything and everything you can think of. 

Save a minimum of 30-50K, more the better. Sold 2 motorcycles; I wish I hadn’t (just my favorite one) but that’s an unknown and we were more than prepared. Your second backup is your TSP in case of an emergency bailout which could possibly be required (It’s in the small print). 

If possible: Go Guard or Reserve for a much easier/mental state of transition period from Blue to Gray or whatever. You can hopefully secure your next career not job and move forward or dabble in alternate dream/passions that will quell that military servitude sense of accomplishment for God and Country. 
 

I agree it wasn’t easy moving on but there are certain times my current career allows me to mingle with our great soldiers and moving them and their war fighting equipment out of the same areas I flew before. Only now they compensate for it when I still would do it anyway, but it’s a nice additive. Sure, we still do CBT’s, but we get paid for that (It’s these little victories that makes things alright). In the end I definitely could have moved up to higher rank and leadership opportunities but sometimes you must know when it’s the most opportune time to leave the party and not be low hanging fruit. 
 

Things to consider:

1. Does the 2.5% jump in retirement pay incrementally out do your next career/Chapter 2 Life potential. (Basically are you wasting time or not). Plus if paid VA benefits immediately, that may out do any rank increase or longevity you plan on. Guessing.

2. Current value of your job or the pressures you are subjected too still worth it. Life on either side has its plus and minuses.

3. Family acclimation - Good and Bad

4. Remember, Big Blue is gone when you retire and your family is for life if it didn’t disintegrate before you left.

5. Face it, are you a career soldier which is great and I want you to succeed. Just accept the noble life you have chosen.

Note: None of the places my wife and I intended to retire too are the same 24 years later. We have moved 3 times in 2 years after military retirement so not much there has changed. Blessed to have work which allows this. 


 

Edited by AirGuardianC141747
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17 hours ago, jrizzell said:

Has anyone used or can you recommend a Military-to-Federal Service resume writing company. I have a good start, but was wondering if anyone here had success, outside of doing it yourself.


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I used Career Pro Global, Inc. in 2016.

Pricey - $1600-ish, but worth it.  My selection for interview rate went up dramatically vs. my version.  They know how to use every buzzword needed to hit the OPM screening algorithm/clueless HR first screener who match, literally, job words to resume words.

Bruce Hillman was my guy.  Unknown if company and/or him are still around.

Good luck.

 

BTW, I was supposed to be running a B&B in Sedona now instead of just retiring from civil service.  But a crashed real estate market in 2008 (my retirement year) changed those plans when kids need feeding and housing.  

YMMV.

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I'm really glad I joined the Air Force, and really glad I got out at 20.   The writer was correct to say that staying after 20 may be costing you money.  But what is in the long term more important is that the older you are the more difficult it is to get hired in most companies, especially high tech companies.  

Of course in job seeking, timing is everything.  I can't blame anyone for staying in the military right now, but as we get into summer and onward there will be an expansion of the economy due to Covid restrictions going away and the effect of the Czar Money Bomb that has just been dropped into the economy.   

Of course we'll wake up to a bad hangover is a couple of years from this Czar Bomb, so staying much into 2022 may not be the best move for older officers and ncos.

Brutus:
There is a tide in the affairs of men.
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.

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Here's a stray thought that might be useful:

If you are considering taking the mediocre man's money and going civil service, look at going NATO civilian.

Not only do those cats work at NATO speed so there'll be plenty of time off, but they are in nice NATO places.  There's even one office in the Norfolk area.

And, you cannot be taxed on your retirement by any NATO member, including Uncle Sam.

I have no idea what working at one of these would be like.  Only a couple of illuminating conversations with a retired USAF and retired RAF dinner conversations while attending a NATO school a few years back.

It is a MAAAASSIVE old boys' (in the who you know, not your gender context) network to get selected and get promoted, but it's doable if this is a thing for you.

Edited by brickhistory
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Has anyone done the JROTC instructor gig?  I’m hearing good things, but it’s through one of those friend of a friend linkages.  Love some firsthand gouge.  Pros/cons?

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6 hours ago, HU&W said:

Has anyone done the JROTC instructor gig?  

A U-2 bud just started a couple of months ago. I’ll ask him about it. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

How important is getting 15 years total active duty time if I want to separate, snag a line number, and then get an AD retirement via AGR/IMA/etc?

Dates:

ADSC Expires: Sept 2023

15 years TAFMS: Feb 2024

Options: I can get out with just under 4 months of terminal when my ADSC expires in Sep 2023 (so May 2023) with 14 years 7 months AD time or "only" roll over 60 days and get out at 15 years time in Feb 2024 (so Dec 2023).

I'd like my cake and to eat it too, so getting out as early as possible with 4 months of leave built up would be preferable to hack a line number anywhere...but I'd also like to guarantee an avenue to the pay check for life club since I'm so dang close. I've heard some airlines (cough Delta) are sticklers on only taking 5 years of SCRA...but most of the others will let you take 6 years off without any issue. Also, not afraid to deploy or snag a job at TACC to get "contingency orders" if needed.

Thoughts?

Edited by StoleIt
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Right now .... no problem. Airlines are waiving USERRA time limits left and right and are generally happy if folks are gone. 
 

I see that rapidly changing. 
 

USERRA gets you 5 years cumulative time away ... for orders over 30 days.  Can you cobble together that last 6-9 months on 1-week orders.... prolly. But it might not be fun and it’ll take a while. 
 

some Airlines have traditionally been more flexible with timelines... some have held to the 5 year rule. That may change as well ... 

bird in the hand ...

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What happens if someone gets to 19+ years, takes a tech notion job, and buys back all of their time into the tech job. Is the ex entitled to anything then? When can you retire? When can you collect money? What would that do to your money in retirement?

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1 hour ago, Guardian said:

What happens if someone gets to 19+ years, takes a tech notion job, and buys back all of their time into the tech job. Is the ex entitled to anything then? When can you retire? When can you collect money? What would that do to your money in retirement?

The ex being entitled to your money depends on the court order/alimony.  The whole 10-year thing only means they can automatically get money allocated from your retirement.  If you get a divorce at 9 years and 355 days, your ex can still be entitled to a portion of your retirement, it just won't be allocated automatically.

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Not what I was asking. If I didn’t reach a 20 year active duty retirement and miss it by one day but then roll the time spent into my technician job then I don’t think she would get any of that retirement as a technician. Is that right? She would just get a portion of my DSG retirement.

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8 hours ago, StoleIt said:

How important is getting 15 years total active duty time if I want to separate, snag a line number, and then get an AD retirement via AGR/IMA/etc?

Not as important as getting a line number.  I was advised by airline guys when I was leaving AD to get a line number ASAP and the 20 years would figure itself out.  I thought I was smarter than them and waited until I was over 14 years TAFMs to hit submit on my apps.  Turns out I should have listened.  With the COVID stuff and exempt orders, I could be on mil leave for 8 years straight, so I could have gotten out right at 12, hired on terminal, and still hit my 20.  Be ready to interview with your availability date as the earliest realistic you could show for training on terminal leave.

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