Contact  |  Baseops Wiki  |  Military Pay  |  Military Discounts  |  Air  Force UPT  |  Aviation  Jobs   |  Aviation  Medicine   |  Pilot Supplies  |  Donate

Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with OpenID Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

- - - - -

Depth perception issues


  • Please log in to reply
87 replies to this topic

#61 -Rolex-

-Rolex-

    SNAP

  • Registered User
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Derka Derka

Posted 23 May 2008 - 08:36 PM

To semi revive this thread...

I'm a rising senior and have already gotten a pilot slot and just recently went to MEPS in Raleigh, NC to renew my physical. Everything was well and good until the dreaded depth test. I've taken depth tests before and had no issue with it but when I got to the part none of the circles beyond row B would pop out at me and I panicked. To make matters worse it was freezing in there and the tech wasn't very friendly and was trying to rush me through it. :bash:

Because I failed and need the depth perception clearance on my physical to go to Freefall on 5 June I'm retaking the test on this Tuesday (27 May). I jumped on here and to my relief saw that other people have experienced trouble with the same test.

Taking the magic eyes advice I went out today and got a book. My question is this:

There are two ways to view the magic eye images, one is diverging your eyes and the other is converging (crossing) them. I find the convergence way to be MUCH easier to do and was wondering if that technique would make the circles jump the same as looking past the image. Anyone who has any idea please drop me a line...really biting my nails for this retake!!!

Edited by laserEYESflyer, 23 May 2008 - 08:38 PM.

  • 0
-Women begin by blocking a man's advances and end by blocking his retreat-

#62 Guest_Voodoo1_*

Guest_Voodoo1_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 19 June 2008 - 04:04 PM

if you noticed in my previous post, i had the same question. after some research, i found that the OVT machine is already setup to stimulate the depth. diverging your eyes slightly is what allows you to hone in on the different levels of depth. also, if you realize, converging your eyes makes an inversion of the image so the circle would be further away, not closer. i went in for my IFC1 in February and passed without my glasses.....barely and to be honest I guessed on a few.
  • 0

#63 jimbobpow13

jimbobpow13

    SNAP

  • Registered User
  • Pip
  • 34 posts

Posted 03 November 2008 - 05:45 PM

Okay. Here is my problem. I just failed the depth perception test at brooks. I am rotc getting my FC1. I already know I am going to need a refractive waiver and the tech said its not a big deal and I will be tested tomorrow. I was wondering if I can get a waiver for both refractive and depth?
  • 0

#64 Butters

Butters

    Gray Beard

  • Supreme User
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 November 2008 - 07:22 PM

Okay. Here is my problem. I just failed the depth perception test at brooks. I am rotc getting my FC1. I already know I am going to need a refractive waiver and the tech said its not a big deal and I will be tested tomorrow. I was wondering if I can get a waiver for both refractive and depth?


WTF is a refractive waiver? If that means you need glasses then after you get glasses the depth perception test becomes exponentially easier since you can now see. As for 2 waivers there is no limit on how many you can have you just have to have them approved and there is no cut and dry answer to what they will approve. For some getting waivers is easy and for other it is not so easy. Just keep at it and don't give up.
  • 0
The exercise is simulated, the buffoonery is real!

#65 jimbobpow13

jimbobpow13

    SNAP

  • Registered User
  • Pip
  • 34 posts

Posted 03 November 2008 - 07:52 PM

WTF is a refractive waiver? If that means you need glasses then after you get glasses the depth perception test becomes exponentially easier since you can now see. As for 2 waivers there is no limit on how many you can have you just have to have them approved and there is no cut and dry answer to what they will approve. For some getting waivers is easy and for other it is not so easy. Just keep at it and don't give up.

Basically, I am just wondering if you can get a excessive refractive error, depth perception and possibly a lattice degeneration that is well within waiverable limits? I just want to make sure I can get all three waivers. These are the ones I look like I need.



That said, two tech's made it seem as though it was not a big deal and that I would just be tested again. Is this really the case?
  • 0

#66 flyski32

flyski32

    SNAP

  • Registered User
  • Pip
  • 42 posts

Posted 03 November 2008 - 09:47 PM

That said, two tech's made it seem as though it was not a big deal and that I would just be tested again. Is this really the case?


Don't worry too much about it. The same thing happened to me, I failed that magic eye circle thing. I think I only got 4 correct, and even one or 2 or those were a SWAG. The following day when your with the optometrist (before you get your eyes dilated) he/she will determine your prescription and a tech will make a quick set of glasses for you (very stylish by the way). Then you'll retake whatever test(s) you failed without the glasses (I think I got 5 correct that time), then while wearing the prescription (aced it). If all goes well and you're within the allowable uncorrected limits you'll be good to go.

Also, when you get your approved FCI paperwork back it'll probably say something about needing to wear corrective lenses in performance of flight duties, or something along those lines.
  • 0

#67 Guest_P27:17_*

Guest_P27:17_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 04 November 2008 - 09:45 AM

Basically, I am just wondering if you can get a excessive refractive error, depth perception and possibly a lattice degeneration that is well within waiverable limits? I just want to make sure I can get all three waivers. These are the ones I look like I need.



That said, two tech's made it seem as though it was not a big deal and that I would just be tested again. Is this really the case?


Look...it's not the quantity of the waviers that is an issue...you can have several defects that need waiver...it's the severity, prognosis, specifics of each case, and the impact on flying safety...yours and the Big Blue's...

- Show stoppers like color vision are not waiverable...you can have it and not realize it or you can game the system and go all the way through the process (taking a seat from someone) but once you hit Brooks they're gonna find it...and if you are on your way to UPT with your U-Haul in the parking lot, your family in billeting, and a newly purchased home waiting for you in Columbus you've really added to your stress factor...
  • 0

#68 FalconXtreme

FalconXtreme

    Flight Lead

  • Supreme User
  • PipPipPip
  • 476 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:california dreamin
  • Interests:flyin, motocycles, cars, paintball, pc's

Posted 01 May 2009 - 12:52 PM

ok so i just got a nav slot and last week i went to maxwell afb to take my fc1.first thing first i have 20/20 uncorrected vision.

in my depth perception box it says "pass - f ovt" what is the "-f" for? i failed the red lens test in that box it says "fail -diplopia" and i failed the field of view test with 135* for both eyes.

i'm getting a retest bc i claimed i was woozy bc of giving blood, not getting a good nites rest, and having not eaten. but if for some reason when i take the tests again i still fail is there a waiver for the red lens test and for field of view tests?
  • 0
-A whirling dervish!

#69 Guest_goducks_*

Guest_goducks_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 02 May 2009 - 09:38 AM

ok so i just got a nav slot and last week i went to maxwell afb to take my fc1.first thing first i have 20/20 uncorrected vision.

in my depth perception box it says "pass - f ovt" what is the "-f" for? i failed the red lens test in that box it says "fail -diplopia" and i failed the field of view test with 135* for both eyes.

i'm getting a retest bc i claimed i was woozy bc of giving blood, not getting a good nites rest, and having not eaten. but if for some reason when i take the tests again i still fail is there a waiver for the red lens test and for field of view tests?


On the depth perception, Pass-F means that you correctly identified all of the targets through line F (which is the last line of the test). The red lens test is a screening test that detects misalignment of the eyes in different directions of gaze. If you fail it, more testing is warranted to identify if there really is a problem or not. The "further testing" (which may include a repeat of the test) will determine where you stand with regards to waiverability, or if you even need a waiver. Red lens failures that are due to true eye misalignments are rare, but do happen. If this is confirmed, a waiver is unlikely.

A true failure on the visual field test is also very unusual. Again, a retest or further evaluation is required to confirm that accuracy of this result. As with the red lens, if this is a correct finding, waiverability is unlikely.

Bottom line is that a couple of flags have been raised on screening tests and warrants a closer look.

GD
  • 0

#70 Guest_guccieng_*

Guest_guccieng_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 30 August 2009 - 04:46 PM

I have been flying as a flight engineer for 5 years now. It was recently "discovered" that my depth perception is not up to standards. I am a flight engineer with 2380 hours on the KC-10 and currently enrolled in the CV-22 program here at Kirtland. My flying class III physical is good with the stipulation of no scanning within 200 meters of the aircraft on the ground or in the air. I have 20/15 vision uncorrected and they were unable to find anything else wrong with my eyes other than me not being able to pass the depth perception circle test or the optometrists tests. My functional manager is saying that I have to find a new job. However, I have a buddy back at Travis with the exact same waiver that is still allowed to fly. Furthermore, I also have a buddy at Tinker who says there are 3 guys in his squadron (that he knows of) that have this same exact waiver as well. I can understand not being able to fly rotary on count of the real scanning that goes on with calling down the aircraft into a site etc; but on a fixed wing there isn't that much actual "scanning" that goes on. Any help on this matter would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  • 0

#71 Gravedigger

Gravedigger

    Gray Beard

  • Supreme User
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,476 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:VA

Posted 30 August 2009 - 10:33 PM

If you can teach yourself to see Magic Eye 3-D images, you can pass the test. I know of several people, including myself that have learned how to "pass" the test using this method. It works on the same principle, and it sure does save you a lot of pain if you can just pass it and not need a waiver. Good luck!

Magic Eye
  • 0
There is something more important than any ultimate weapon. That is the ultimate position—the position of total control over Earth that lies somewhere out in space. That is the distant future, though not so distant as we may have thought. Whoever gains that ultimate position gains control, total control, over the Earth, for the purposes of tyranny or for the service of freedom.

— Lyndon B. Johnson, United States Senator, 1958

#72 Guest_CA_*

Guest_CA_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 31 August 2009 - 08:00 AM

If you can teach yourself to see Magic Eye 3-D images, you can pass the test. I know of several people, including myself that have learned how to "pass" the test using this method. It works on the same principle, and it sure does save you a lot of pain if you can just pass it and not need a waiver. Good luck!

Magic Eye


So the 5 circles test is like the magic eye stuff? I failed the DP test at MEPS horribly but I can see that magic eye stuff like it's easy.
  • 0

#73 Toro

Toro

    Administrator

  • Administrator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5,137 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SPS
  • Qual:F-15E/T-38

Posted 31 August 2009 - 11:06 PM

So the 5 circles test is like the magic eye stuff? I failed the DP test at MEPS horribly but I can see that magic eye stuff like it's easy.

I've never heard the analogy, and I'll let one of the docs give an official answer, but I can see the comparison. Both of them seem to work when you let your eyes relax rather than trying to focus on a certain point.
  • 0
Signature blocks are silly and serve only to take up space

#74 Guest_Run07_*

Guest_Run07_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 10 September 2009 - 06:57 AM

I am applying for a pilot position at an ANG base. Although I believe I may have a disqualifying medical issue.

I have read a few things on the forum about Strabismus. What I have gathered is that it is disqualifying but could be waved. I have had Strabismus surgery twice. I first noticed a problem when I was having a hard time reading. When I went to the doctor that is when he told me what was wrong. I was shocked because it wasn't something that was cosmetically noticeable. The first time I had the surgery it didn't go as planned. I came out of the surgery worse off than I was before and had double vision for six months. Then I had the second surgery and could see just fine. I would like to know whether I would be disqualified to be a pilot because of the surgery. I have seen my ophthalmologist since the surgery and everything seems to be fine. After reading more about the condition I am becoming more concerned with my chances as a pilot in the AF. I am going back to my Ophthalmologist in a few days as a follow up to my last surgery a year ago. I am more interested in finding out if the surgery was successful. Are there specific questions I could ask that would give me and idea if this will affect my chances?
  • 0

#75 Guest_goducks_*

Guest_goducks_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 10 September 2009 - 07:40 AM

I am applying for a pilot position at an ANG base. Although I believe I may have a disqualifying medical issue.

I have read a few things on the forum about Strabismus. What I have gathered is that it is disqualifying but could be waved. I have had Strabismus surgery twice. I first noticed a problem when I was having a hard time reading. When I went to the doctor that is when he told me what was wrong. I was shocked because it wasn't something that was cosmetically noticeable. The first time I had the surgery it didn't go as planned. I came out of the surgery worse off than I was before and had double vision for six months. Then I had the second surgery and could see just fine. I would like to know whether I would be disqualified to be a pilot because of the surgery. I have seen my ophthalmologist since the surgery and everything seems to be fine. After reading more about the condition I am becoming more concerned with my chances as a pilot in the AF. I am going back to my Ophthalmologist in a few days as a follow up to my last surgery a year ago. I am more interested in finding out if the surgery was successful. Are there specific questions I could ask that would give me and idea if this will affect my chances?


Strabismus surgery is disqualifying, but waiverable assuming that 1) you are able to meet the depth perception requirements, 2) you have no diplopia in all directions of gaze out to 30 degrees, and 3) there is no significant residual tropia.

I'm baffled as to how a person would get strabismus surgery when difficult reading is the only symptom. Never heard of such a thing.

Anyhow, there is a chance at a waiver, but there will be a lot of scrutiny when you go through your FCI. Most people who are post strabismus surgery still have problems with binocular vision and many are not waivered. It all depends on how well your eyes function.
  • 0

#76 Guest_Run07_*

Guest_Run07_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 10 September 2009 - 07:58 AM

Strabismus surgery is disqualifying, but waiverable assuming that 1) you are able to meet the depth perception requirements, 2) you have no diplopia in all directions of gaze out to 30 degrees, and 3) there is no significant residual tropia.

I'm baffled as to how a person would get strabismus surgery when difficult reading is the only symptom. Never heard of such a thing.

Anyhow, there is a chance at a waiver, but there will be a lot of scrutiny when you go through your FCI. Most people who are post strabismus surgery still have problems with binocular vision and many are not waivered. It all depends on how well your eyes function.



Where would I find the depth perception requirements?
  • 0

#77 Guest_goducks_*

Guest_goducks_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 10 September 2009 - 09:37 AM

Where would I find the depth perception requirements?


The standard USAF requirement for depth perception is based on the OVT (Optec Vision Tester) and I believe it is 25 arc seconds, but that's a wag. The version the AF uses is essentially proprietary to the AF, ie. you can't get the exact slide they use, however you can look up the website if you want more info. If you can't pass the OVT, waivers are partially based on distance stereopsis using an AO Vectographic polarized slide and I think the requirement is 60 arc seconds. If findings from that test are iffy, then the final test is using a real space depth perception task called a Howard-Dohlman sp?.

Refer to section A4.12 of the AFI 48-123 vol III for more info.

Beyond depth perception, there are other tests that are done such as cover test, red lens test and 4 diopter base out, which are all designed to look for suppression and or a micro-tropia (a small misalignment that isn't cosmetically visible). Bottom line is that your eyes don't have to be perfect, but they need to be functioning fairly normally to get a waiver for a history of strabismus surgery.

That doesn't cover everything, but gives you a fairly decent idea about what is considered.

GD
  • 0

#78 Guest_JDCWelch_*

Guest_JDCWelch_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 11 December 2009 - 07:35 PM

I was told by my optometrist that I have fusion with defective stereopsis and me eyes apparently switch between having depth perception and not having depth perception, she said it could be months between. Everything else with my eyes is good.
I have had trouble with the depth perception test, OVT, in the past but the last two times I have gone, August and December, I passed up to the minimum requirement,"D". I failed the test in May this year and July the year before. After failing twice I started practicing with some of those 3D pictures and I feel this is a major reason why I was able to pass the last two times, and also because I was more relaxed and took my time. She is telling me that I will need a waiver to be able to fly. What are my chances of getting a waiver?

Thanks,
Chase
  • 0

#79 Guest_JollyFlight21_*

Guest_JollyFlight21_*
  • Unregistered / Not Logged In

Posted 11 December 2009 - 07:56 PM

Again, I've never, ever passed the depth perception test. Nor have I ever seen one of those 3D dolphin pictures or whatever they are (I've never seen them...). 8 years strong and still flying. :salut:
  • 0

#80 VFR800

VFR800

    Crew Dawg

  • Registered User
  • PipPip
  • 197 posts

Posted 11 December 2009 - 11:24 PM

I failed the test... only got to try the first four circles before he failed me.

But I rushed through it because they never told me to take my time (you have to if you want to pass) and because of the general atmosphere at MEPS.

I have good DP, and failed it. The first circle was super obvious, though.

The one at MEPS doesn't matter. Just take your time when you do it at the MTF for your FC1 physical, since that's the one that counts. You're going to have to take this test every year for the rest of your career, so figure it out now or it's going to be a recurring asspain. Take your f*cking time...that's the key to it.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users