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MEPS and Vitamin D Deficiency

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Getting ready to go to MEPS but my records state a history of vitamin D deficiency. I can't find anywhere in any medical regulations that state vitamin D deficiency is a DQ. My current levels are 25 ng/ML which falls in the range of insufficiency. Below 20 is deficiency. 30 and above is normal. My recruiter thinks I will get DQ and if routed up to the ANG SG office, it won't get approved because it's a 50-50% chance. Anyone know anything about this or should I just suck it up, wait a few months to raise my vitamin D levels and then resubmit? My only concern is this is pushing my timeline even further right and if I can avoid it then I definitely will find a way to. 

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1. I'm not a doc or nutritionist, but I have schooling in chemistry/biochemistry.

2. If you have a medical condition that affects vit D absorption, that will be the bigger issue.  If that is not diagnosed in records, then there isn't a known issue.  But if you think there is an underlying condition, it's in your best interest to get that figured out, you know, because of living.  Also, knowing the root cause will help with the right version of supplements.  Or you could be a vegan vampire and thus don't really get enough sunlight or food-based vit D.

However, do you really have a deficiency?

3. WebMd says, "A level of 20 nanograms/milliliter to 50 ng/mL is considered adequate for healthy people. A level less than 12 ng/mL indicates vitamin D deficiency."  This is a quote from Harvard, "In 2010, the venerable Institute of Medicine (IOM) issued a report based on lengthy examination of data by a group of experts. To sum up, they estimated that a vitamin D level of 20 ng/mL or higher was adequate for good bone health, and subsequently a level below 20 was considered a vitamin D deficiency."  So is your level really deficient?

I don't think MEPS does a nutrient level blood test.  If they do, beef up (pun intended).

4. Lastly, and it's been a long time since I visited a MEPs, but do they get access to your civilian medical records?  Or are these military medical records?  When I went, no civ records, just a lengthy questionnaire.  So if there isn't a specific question regarding vit D (and WebMD/Harvard says yours is in the normal range) and the docs don't ask that question, then there's nothing to bring up.  But seriously, refer to point #2 if you think there is something going on.

Lastly, no doc here, just been around the block a time or so. 

Out

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4 minutes ago, disgruntledemployee said:

1. I'm not a doc or nutritionist, but I have schooling in chemistry/biochemistry.

2. If you have a medical condition that affects vit D absorption, that will be the bigger issue.  If that is not diagnosed in records, then there isn't a known issue.  But if you think there is an underlying condition, it's in your best interest to get that figured out, you know, because of living.  Also, knowing the root cause will help with the right version of supplements.  Or you could be a vegan vampire and thus don't really get enough sunlight or food-based vit D.

However, do you really have a deficiency?

3. WebMd says, "A level of 20 nanograms/milliliter to 50 ng/mL is considered adequate for healthy people. A level less than 12 ng/mL indicates vitamin D deficiency."  This is a quote from Harvard, "In 2010, the venerable Institute of Medicine (IOM) issued a report based on lengthy examination of data by a group of experts. To sum up, they estimated that a vitamin D level of 20 ng/mL or higher was adequate for good bone health, and subsequently a level below 20 was considered a vitamin D deficiency."  So is your level really deficient?

I don't think MEPS does a nutrient level blood test.  If they do, beef up (pun intended).

4. Lastly, and it's been a long time since I visited a MEPs, but do they get access to your civilian medical records?  Or are these military medical records?  When I went, no civ records, just a lengthy questionnaire.  So if there isn't a specific question regarding vit D (and WebMD/Harvard says yours is in the normal range) and the docs don't ask that question, then there's nothing to bring up.  But seriously, refer to point #2 if you think there is something going on.

Lastly, no doc here, just been around the block a time or so. 

Out

Thanks for the response! No medical condition regarded to Vitamin absorption. Just some bitching in college about being tired a lot so my TRICARE doctor just said it might be vitamin D deficiency so that is what was put into the records. 

 

So I got the blood work from Quest Diagnostics and their paper work stated 20-30 ng/mL is insufficient but not deficient. My recruiter has no clue on what standard MEPS uses so the Quest Diagnostic readings kind of spooked her. And because of that doesn't want to submit me until I'm "fixed" but who knows how long that could take.

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Im about to graduate PA school next month so I though I'd chime in.  Vitamin D is essential for calcium/phosphate production and absorption.  Vitamin D is produced by your kidneys. D2 and reduced by sunlight to the active vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). Most common cause of Vitamin D deficiency is being inside for too long, especially in northern latitudes and cloudy overcast days.  A few of the most common reasons fora  pathologic deficiency is renal failiure or rickets, causing a condition called osteomalacia where your poor little body is consuming its own bones for Ca+ and PO4- . My advice, if your BMP/CMP lab workup is fine and your don't have signs of renal failure such as: fatigue, malaise , edema, itching, lower or upper extremity pain, CAD, MI, dyspnea, nausea, vomiting, muscle twitching, encephalopathy (brain swelling), pale skin, or yellowing of the skin, easy bruising (low platelets) then go out in the sun for 15 mins a day or to Walmart and get some D3 5000 IUs. Or even more effective, prescription for D2 (ergaciforol) 50,000 IU/weekly to get your levels up. Caveat: if your prone to kidney stones, stay away from the supplements.

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