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Details on Age Requirements

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Guest SteveW   
Guest SteveW

Hello fellow pilots! I am searching for people with information on my dillema. To sum up my situation, it's been my lifelong dream to fly military. My vision started downhill as a high school senior. I therefore pursued civilian flying and obtained my BS degree in Aviation. I have my commercial-instrument and multi (now working on CFI) with over 500 hours (100 being multi). I just recently discovered that laser correction surgery was now allowed for military pilots so, being determined to find a way in, I had PRK two weeks ago. So far I'm at 20/20 and improving! The problem, however, is that my age and the timing of this vision waiver didn't align too well. I just turned 31 (tough luck). I feel my background and motivation would qualify me pretty well to get selected. So far, I've been told Air Force age limits are set in stone and my local Guard/Reserve contacts have been disappointing. The Army said they allow waivers up to 32 so that sounds like my only option. With all of this said I would really appreciate anyone's help if they have knowledge in this area!

Is the age policy across the board or can it vary from unit to unit if a candidate is otherwise qualified?

Can anyone provide a point of contact that is the final authority on waivers?

If the Army WOFT rotary wing route is my only option for military flying how likely is it to get the fixed-wing pipeline. Is there a possibility of crossing over into another branch once trained even though I'd be even older?

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Guest corppilot   
Guest corppilot

Anyone else know a link or where to look to verify age limit for the AF, to get into OTS and UPT without an age waiver?

Always thought the age was 27 1/2 based on research and hearsay? This is the first time I have heard 30 as the limit without an age waiver.

Thanks for the help!

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Guest Wxpunk   
Guest Wxpunk

Here's a couple of links. I wish I could find an official AF site for you, but don't really have the time. Sorry.

Site #1

Site #2

Also, I was selected for a Nav slot due to my age (29). And, I'm pretty sure that you don't have to be AFROTC to apply before you graduate. I believe the rule is you can apply and meet with a Pilot Selection Board if you graduate the following semester. That's what I did, of course I'm prior service.

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Guest jackhammer130   
Guest jackhammer130

I have two very close friends that did just that. They are both in the 40's. They did not require a waiver or anything. Doesn't make a whole lot of sense I know, but it is a way of getting past the age thing if you don't mind flying for the Army. Have you thought about the possibilty of a NAV slot. AirGuard units will usually waiver up to 32, or at least mine does.

Hope this helps

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Guest C-21 Pilot   
Guest C-21 Pilot

Steve,

My understanding of the age requirement is that it is hard decked across the board, BUT the individual units can issue waivers. I could be wrong.

Problem is you are 31 there are waivers but they are only up unitl age 33, there is a current Air Force Chief of Staff policy letter out that states "Non one over age 33 will get an age waiver."

On the whole process, and I speak from the Guard only, You first gotta look at AFI 36-2205 and see if your reason for wanting a waiver is any where near the ones given as examples there, or you gotta have one hell of a good reason. Theme seems to be that the AF, or someone in the AF caused a delay or paper work jam etc. then you gotta get your unit, mainly Wing Commander to select you and back you for the waiver and back your reason, next it goes to the State (Air force) Commander, then to the MAJCOM commander, in the Guard this is Gen. Weaver, he has the right to shoot it down, if he endorses the thing this is the biggest hurdel, becuase the AF is not likely to turn down his request unless it is a medical issue (all from what I have been told by NGB) next it goes to the Commander of Personel then on the the AFCS. Now Gen Mike Ryan was pretty favorable to everyone under 33, he signed a few a year. I have no idea what Gen. Jumpers' attitude will be.

The entire process took a while. From the time you'll start trying to do it, is 6 months, and I heard medical ones take even longer.

In short look at AFI 36-2205 for proceedures.

The quick study that no one over 33 goes to UPT at the direction of the Air Force Cheif of Staff in a policy letter handed out this past February. If you are 30-33 you can get one, probably not from an active duty source. Right now the best shot is in the Guard as you need a an endorsement from your MAJCOM commander. Takes about 8-10 months to get one.

Basicly all waivers have to come from the Chief of staff of the Air Force and they all must be for a good reason and for a guy who can be in UPT by age 33. Guard ask for them more than any other part of the AF, but they are very hard to get and as I said you gotta have a good reason.

If you want an age waiver and want to fly, might I suggest the Guard. They will attempt to get you a waiver up to age 33( you'll have to check on the upper age limits to be sure). The problem, notwithstanding the waiver itself, is finding a unit who wants you bad enough to pursue a waiver. Once that hurdle is cleared it will take anywhere from 6 months to a year to get the waiver approved through the Guard and the AF(the AF has to approve it because you'll have to go back through UPT).

As afr as the Army is concerned....

There are two main avenues to flying for the Army. First is the commissioned officer route. Second is the warrant officer route. I'd personally pursue the warrant officer route, for reasons I'll mention later.

To become a commissioned officer pilot, you have to earn a commission through the US Military Academy (West Point), Army ROTC, or Army Officer Candidate School (OCS). If you're in college, and you have 2 years or more left, look into ROTC.

In all three programs, there is no guarantee of aviation prior to taking a commission. You apply for Aviation while you're in training. It's easier to get aviation from the Academy or ROTC, and OCS is a bit harder to get a pilot slot, but not impossible. Also, if you don't get aviation right away, you can do something else and then apply for flight school.

The warrant officer route has just one method....go see a recruiter, fill out the paperwork and apply, get selected, and then attend Basic Combat Training (BCT) followed by Warrant Officer Candidate School (WOCS). You can technically apply for the Warrant Officer Flight Program (WOFP) right out of high school, but you won't be competitive, I'll tell you that right off the bat. In order to be competitive, you need to have at least 2 years of college or have your degree already (WHICH YOU STATED YOU HAVE A DEGREE IN AVIATION). The few who do get picked up with no college are generally prior-service enlisted types who excelled in their enlisted military service.

Once you complete a commissioning source or WOCS, you then go to flight school. For commissioned types, this means you first attend Phase I of Aviation Officer Basic Course (AOBC), which I think is about 4 weeks long. Then, both warrants and commissioned officers attend Initial Entry Rotary Wing flight school, or IERW. IERW has five phases. The first one is the aeromedical phase, which lasts 2 weeks and goes into aviation physiology and other aeromedical subjects.

Next, you proceed to Primary phase, where you fly the VFR version of the TH-67A Creek. This is basically a Bell 206B JetRanger 3, with a few avionics mods. Your first couple flights are "straight-and-level" flights...the instructor does all the hovering, you just try your hand at flying at 1,000 feet straight and level.

Your next 4-5 rides, you head out to Hooper stage field and try hovering and get your first crack at an autorotation. Hovering isn't easy, and you'll feel totally defeated the first few rides. But eventually things should click, and you'll pick it up fast. After Hooper, the rest of your flying is done at Lucas stagefield, where you practice autorotations, no-hydraulics landings and a bunch of other stuff. There are two checkrides, P1 and P2. P1 is basically a pre-solo checkride to make sure you're not going to kill yourself. P2 is the all-encompassing one where you perform all maneuvers taught to you.

After Primary, you enter Instruments, flying the IFR version of the TH-67. Same helicopter, but a whole lot more instruments and radios. You'll log 30 hours first in the UH-1 simulator, that's been slightly modified to have all the TH-67 avionics included. You won't be graded on UH-1 switchology...just IFR maneuvers like climbs, descents, flying approaches, etc. Then you fly the real helicopter for about 20 hours, flying all kinds of approaches (ILS/LOC/LOCBC/VOR/NDB) and practicing holding (intersection, navaid, NDB holding). You have three instrument checkrides. One halfway through the sim, just to make sure the basic IFR concepts are sinking in, one at the end of the sim, and one at the end of the flying portion.

Finally, you make it to BCS, or Basic Combat Skills. In the "old days", you could track either Attack/Scout flying the OH-58A, or the Utility/Cargo syllabus flying the UH-1H Huey. They still have the Huey track around for mostly the National Guard guys, but nearly everyone now goes through the OH-58 track, which has become a common-syllabus program for everyone. At first you learn to fly the OH-58, in the contact phase. You take a checkride at the end of that phase to ensure you can fly the OH-58. Next, you learn to fly the OH-58 in a tactical environment. This is the best phase...you get to fly the 58 at tree-top level, practice spotting artillery, observing enemy troop movements, fly in formation at tree-top level (or below)...it's just a blast. You'll take another checkride to evaluate your terrain flight skills and navigation skills (yes, you must navigate using only a map at tree-top level).

After your tactical checkride, you then go to the final phase, the NVG phase. You get a few rides at night without the gogs, then log about 20 hours flying "in the weeds" with the gogs on. You will practice blacked-out landings in LZs (Landing Zones), fly at tree-top level at night with the NVGs on, and even do night autorotations. Fun. Then you get a checkride.

Once the NVG ride is complete, you are now IERW complete. But not a flight school grad yet. Commissioned officers continue to AOBC Phase II, and that lasts 6 weeks culminating in a SEREX (Escape and Evasion exercise) and FTX (Field Training Exercise) all in one.

Warrant officers will go to an Aviation Warrant Officer Basic Course (AWOBC), that lasts 4 weeks. This consists of classes on the Army maintenance system, tactical stuff (artillery, infantry, etc), and you'll spend a week in the field doing your own SEREX and FTX.

Commissioned officers and warrant officers have seperate graduations and get their wings after completion of the AOBC or AWOBC course. It's during this last part of flight school that you'll fill out a "dream sheet" and get your assignment. There is no "drop" per se. Generally, the Army will try to match you with an airframe first, then location. Some people will get both their airframe and location of choice, others will be lucky to get the airframe they want.

As far as getting to fly guns (attack helicopters), it's not too hard. Just graduate and you shouldn't have trouble getting either an Apache or a Kiowa Warrior (which will ultimately translate into a Commanche later). The top grads consistently choose Black Hawks and Chinooks, simply because they have more real-world missions, and unlike the Air Force, flying a "heavy" helicopter doesn't mean you won't get to see the fight or get to shoot at anything. With exception of the medevac flights, all Army helos are armed with something, and all Army helos see direct combat.

As for flying the H-6, the only guys that do that are the ones with the 160th SOAR (Special Operations Aviation Regiment). They have both MH-6 and AH-6 variants, and you have to try out for the 160th to fly them. They typically take Apache and Kiowa Warrior pilots to fly the H-6.

Now, about the commissioned/warrant thing. Commissioned officers exist in Army aviation to run the unit. They are essentially admin. Having wings allows them to better understand how to command and run an aviation unit. Back in the old old days, it wasn't uncommon to have an infantry grunt with no wings command an aviation unit. But nowadays, they make aviation commanders be winged aviators so that the unit leadership has a common background.

Don't expect to fly much as a commissioned officer. There are basically three jobs where you could fly on a regular basis: Platoon leader, company commander, and battalion commander. The other jobs for commissioned guys are battalion staff and brigade staff officers. In those positions, they'll make you a FAC2 or FAC3 aviator (FACs are levels that designate how "important" you are to the flying mission, and thus allocates how much flying time you get).

A FAC1 aviator is mission-essential, and must fly at least 90 hours a year. A FAC2 aviator is a mission-capable pilot (generally reserved for overstrength warrant officers and unit commanders), and you get a minimum of 60 hours a year. A FAC3 aviator is non-mission essential (staff guys) and there is no minimum flight time...in other words, if they wanted, they could not let you fly at all and make you an office weenie.

If you're a warrant, your primary job is a pilot. You may have secondary jobs, but you're #1 concern is flying. As a warrant, you can go to instructor pilot school or maintenance test pilot school. And, except in rare cases, you'll always be a FAC1 or 2 pilot.

I hope all this info helps...some of it may have changed some (especially the details about flight school...it's always in a state of flux). Good luck in whatever you pursue. And stay persistent and work hard, even out of flight school. Your wings are a license to learn.

For more info on Amry pilot training, here's a link: http://www.lsirucker.com/

Too make a super long story extremely short, you have to do your research, commit to your research and find loopholes in the system...and trust me, after studying law, I can see loopholes.

I would recommend trying the Army programs, you'll probably be more successful in getting a slot

http://www.afpc.randolph.af.mil/specfly/tr...ransfermain.htm

That link is the bible to interservice transfer. If you cannot get onto the link, search the afpc website and look for contact numbers.

DPAOT3

Special Flying Programs

DSN 665-2306

DSN FAX 665-1379

COMM (210) 565-1379

afpc.dpaot3@randolph.af.mil

--Cheers

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Guest Bushmaster   
Guest Bushmaster

Wow, C-21 pilot, man you fly the Learjet but I would never guess you knew all this Army stuff... How do you know all this stuff? You wanted to be an Army guy in the past? Great information for us Army WO wanna-bes... Thanks.

Steve, my buddy Dreadlux on this forum is your age and he just applied for Army WOFT. Now he is waiting for the board and physical results. You can contact him for application details, too... Umm, you have to meet the selection board before turning 29 and start WOFT before 30 but Army waivers it depending on a lot of factors. Like your competitiveness. As far as I know Army OCS cut-off age is 29 and my recruiter told me that they only waiver it for active duty guys, not for people off the street. He said the same thing about WOFT,too but you know recruiters, they say a lot of things to get you in...

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Guest dreadlux   
Guest dreadlux

Really great info. C-21!!!

Steve,

With your background it wouldn't hurt to apply to WOCS/WOFT. From what I keep hearing, the Army looks at your ability to serve for 20 years before the age of 55. Like Bushmaster said, I'm in the process of submitting my packet now, and my background isn't as good as yours. We'll see if I am selected, but I'll never know, if I don't give it a shot.

Do everything you can yourself as soon as possible (forms can be downloaded, request letters of Recommendation, etc.) then go to a recruiting station and speak with a recruiter. Of course they will ho and hum, but let them know you are serious and have already completed your side of the packet.....You really just need him or her to set up the ASVAB, AFAST, and flight physical!

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Guest herkeng   
Guest herkeng

I have a question for you guys out there. I am currently involved in the Air Force Education Leave of Absence Program (formally known as Bootstrap). I will graduate in February 2005 and have an OTS package going in October of this year. The problem is I want to fly, but I will be about 6 months past the age cut off of 30. I know for a fact that people have gone through UPT at 31 and 32 with waivers; I just don’t know the channels to make this happen. I have a civilian license with 250+ hours PIC and 1800 hours as a C-130 Flight Engineer. Any guidance on this would be much appreciated.

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Guest AirGuardian   
Guest AirGuardian

For the Active Duty normally,

there is a clause for a one-time waiver to meet the UPT board for active duty if you have met any of the criteria set forth. One example of the criteria is misinformation given to you by MPF or whatnot regarding the age limit. If a physical ailment of some sort has been rectified to meet flight requirements for an aircrew member you can apply for the waiver as well. Don't recall the third possibility but someone on this site I'm sure can chime in on where you can read the reg and see if you meet any of these criteria. For the Guard/Reserves we have a little more leeway in such an endeavor since I did finish UPT hitting the 32 mark or so back in the day! Goodluck!

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Guest AirGuardian   
Guest AirGuardian

Guardwise,

I believe you are correct, or was it 33 or 34? Either way it was initially reserved for those with dissappearing AFSC's during conversion to another platform which doesn't require your services. But, I do recall several normal Nav's being covered under this "All States Blanket Waiver" to attend UPT! So, under that assumption-I think your right again as a rated Nav and have the support of your unit - since they have the paperwork to submit and all. MOST of the times they seem to know best on who should be given this opportunity. Good luck and hope to see you out in the system in the future!

[ 01. July 2004, 09:42: Message edited by: AirGuardian ]

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Bergman    229

A quick look at the "bible" (AFI 36-2205) has yielded the following info. I should note that it appears the verbage concerning Navigators in conversion units being accepted up to 34 years old [for UPT] has been removed from the reg.

1.1.6. Applicants must not exceed their 30th birthday or 5 years beyond their Total Federal Commissioned

Service Date (TFCSD), by the start date of the board’s first available UFT class. For those

applicants who exceed the above criteria, and had at least one opportunity to compete for UFT, commanders

must justify why supporting a waiver on an individual over other qualified candidates who

meet the criteria is in the best interest of the Air Force. For waivers to be considered, the applicant

must document an Air Force administrative, counseling, or medical error occurred within the last 2

years that prevented the applicant from applying for UFT.

NOTE: See Attachment 2 for age and

commissioned service waiver procedures. If the applicant can justify a waiver using this criteria, they

must submit a complete copy of the UFT application, to include a completed flying class I/IA physical,

certified by HQ AETC/SGPS, with the request for an age or TFCSD waiver processed through the

applicant’s immediate Squadron/CC, Wing/CC, NAF/CC, and MAJCOM/CC, and forwarded to HQ

AF/DPFMF, 1040 Air Force Pentagon, Washington DC 20330-1040, for processing and forwarding to

CSAF for final action. All waivers are reviewed on an individual basis and, if approved, allow the

applicant a one-time opportunity to compete for UFT. If the requested age or TFCSD waiver is

approved by CSAF after the board cut-off date, the applicant will be eligible to compete on the next

selection board. The disapproval authority within the MAJCOM chain of command for age or TFCSD

waiver is vested in the MAJCOM/CC. If the application is disapproved, it will be returned to the

applicant. ANG waiver requests must be processed through the State Adjutant General to HQ ANG/

DP. If the request is disapproved, it will be returned to the applicant’s state headquarters, who will forward

to the applicant’s unit. AFRC waiver requests must be processed through HQ AFRC/DPMB.

The CSAF may delegate the approval authority for all age and commissioned service waiver requests.

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Guest AirGuardian   
Guest AirGuardian

Not our "Bible" per say, Active Duty Regs do not stipulate the the end all when it comes to the Guard and Reserves. What I was refering to was the "All States" message for the reference to 34 for the ANG specifically. Does not apply for Active Duty, so you will not find it their paperwork. ANG Regs do exist and cover these type of areas which are unique to the Guard and so forth. Many things do parallel the so-called "Bible," but since it isn't really the bible, we tend to paraphrase it as we please to make things happen which are logic based. As you know in the AF, nothing is very logic/common sense based!

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Guest herkeng   
Guest herkeng

A quick question for anyone who can help. I am on active duty, currently in the “bootstrap program” finishing up my degree and I want to fly. I have a PPL with about 300 hours and about 1600 hrs as a C-130 Flight Engineer. I have good grades and the support from my Ops Group Commander to go to UPT. The problem is I just turned 30 years old with six months left of school and taking my AFOQT next week. MPF has told me that there is no chance of getting a rated position because of my age. Everyone else has told me that MPF doesn’t know what they are talking about and that they will just give you the easy answer of “NO”. My question is if there is any real chance of this waiver going through and does anyone have some pointers that could help the cause. Any information would be great. Thanks.

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Guest AirGuardian   
Guest AirGuardian

Trusting the Maximum Pit Fall(MPF) shop is the first mistake most make. I have done it before during my youth. Always get a second opinion and use your connections/networking skills to get the job done. Use Razorback's advice and get your ducks in line(facts and paperwork) and approach your OG for help if he's really interested in your future! Having a great OG on your side is never a bad thing!!!

[ 13. July 2004, 09:25: Message edited by: AirGuardian ]

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Guest Fly_By   
Guest Fly_By

I know everyone here is probably sick of hearing about age waivers, but I was just wondering if anyone has recently been granted one. I have been accepted by a Reserve unit to be a 130 nav but it is all contingent upon the waiver. I'm 30, and I am putting my package together now. Any suggestions or examples that someone might be willing to share would be greatly appreciated! I have been told that these things can take a very long time so I want to do all I can to make sure I send off a package that will get consideration.

Again - sorry if I am beating a dead horse here, but I figured it couldn't hurt to ask!

In the meantime I will search the boards for any past info related to this subject.

Thanks

[ 13. September 2004, 13:43: Message edited by: Fly_By ]

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Guest Wxpunk   
Guest Wxpunk

It's not an age waiver, but an "Exception to Policy" letter. I'm in the same boat, age 30 selected as Nav.

My unit had to seek endorsement by a Major General, at Kentucky NG HQ, before sending the package up to NGB for final approval. I'm told a Lieutenant General has to sign off on the package and it's a done deal. Of course, they've had the package for more than two months now, making my total wait four months since the package was submitted. Keep in mind; I still haven't received my final approval.

I hope this helps.

Good Luck!

---------------

Wxpunk

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VL-16    5

I'm currently working on my instrument license with an ex-marine corps forward observer who is 34 years old. He is highly rated (CFI, CFII, MEI, ATP) and has a boatload of hours. He flew the ERJ (same jet at the CRJ just made in brazil) for a regional airline out of Newark but they were paying him $22,000/year and he had to live with 3 other guys due to living costs and he got sick of that so he came back here to instruct. Back when he was looking into flying for the military, eye standards were more stringent (he has 20/70) so he never persued it. Military flying has been his dream ever since childhood and the guy has the personality of a fighter pilot and would fit in well at a ANG unit (I would drink with him....he doesn't annoy me, etc). He is interested in flying either the F-15C, F-16 or A-10. He is really sharp, could kill the PFT, and is really interested in going guard. I told him that he would have to get a waiver due to his age, and I'm wondering if anyone could fill me in on his chances of receiving a UPT waiver Would there be a higher chance of the guard making an exception due to his experience? Also, who should he talk to about getting a waiver? Thanks guys/gals.

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Guest Wxpunk   
Guest Wxpunk

I seriously, seriously doubt it. Why? He already has two strikes against his package (age/vision) and there are something like 60 applicants per Guard fighter slot.

Reality stated, if he doesn't try, I'm sure he won't get selected. Tell him to go for it, just prepare him for the likely.

-------------

Wxpunk

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Guest AirGuardian   
Guest AirGuardian

Age waivers must be granted under the terms of "Justification!" That is the end all. It all comes down to having something to offer vs all the other extremely qualified non-age critical candidates that are applying. Just being candid here: "What makes you better than all the others who have the same scores???" That is what you're friend/instructor is up against. Having hours is helpful as ISU28 indicated and many time hurtful if they're not really applicable. Unless the hours are in previous military type aircraft - helo/other similarly flown aircraft than it's not a real plus... We didn't hire a recent airline 3500 hour plus guy because of the overall picture. Personality traits and other things came across as NOT being a fit to our unit. Once again, a few hundred hours looks good, after that it's just gravy and means nothing to many units... Trainable = yes! Justification wise, the waiver requires some sort of above and beyond reasoning for hire. "We want this guy because his invaluable experience in XXXX will give this unit the much added XXXX during it's conversion to the XXXX." as an example. Can't be anything like the other candidates if you know what I'm getting at! Distancing yourself in a good way is the key! Age waivers don't grow on trees, more now than before so it's worth a shot if your friend can find a unit that will support his cause??? RJ time won't cut it for the waiver, maybe he has something else that can be used as an invaluable experience??? Start there. No waiver, no UPT and that's where it starts if he's already physically qualified! Good luck to him and way to look out for HIM!

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Guest cavpilot58d   
Guest cavpilot58d

I'm currently serving in Iraq as an OH-58D Kiowa Warrior helicopter pilot in the Army, but I want to join the ANG upon completion of my Army committment.

I currently have over 1100 hours, over 900 combat hours, and will pursue my fixed-wing PPL when I redeploy. I'm a Captain with a BS in Mech. Eng., and I know I wouldn't have any problems passing any tests or meeting any requirements.

Except.... I will be 30 when I can get out of the Army. I've read about the < 30 years old requirement and understand there MIGHT be waivers available. Given my aviation/combat experience and service to this country, what are my chances of getting an age waiver.

Does anyone know if I can begin the process of applying to the ANG before I formally leave the Army to speed the process? We're only talking a matter of months that I'll be into my 30th B-day.

I've been told that Active Duty AF will "buy out" an Army Aviation committment - any chance ANG would do the same in my last year to avoid the age problem?

I'm from Portland, OR and want to joing the F-15 Squadron that is there. Does being from the local community help the application process as a sign of stability and a committment to stay with the unit?

I really appreciate any thoughts and advice on this subject.

Thank you all for your outstanding service to this great country!

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Guest Skid27   
Guest Skid27

For the Guard, there is no age limit for Fixed Wing Qual. I was 33 when I attended. Getting hired by a fighter unit can be pretty challenging. Heavy units tend to hire more former helo types. However, Portland did recently hire a former USAF helo guy. You might want to call the unit and talk with him. I seriously doubt anyone would pay off your contract, but who knows. Good luck

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Guest Salami   
Guest Salami

I am a former 58D WO, now 36 yrs. old and am just starting Fixed Wing Qual at Vance. I rushed an A-10 unit and was accepted. Not to discourage you but I made my first visit to the unit in 2000. I went to most of their drills and hung out there as much as possible. Got hired in late 2004. They just weren't hiring when I first started rushing yrs. back. I am just glad to be where I am, and look forward to flying CAS for the grunts, this time from a different platform. Besides good timing, I am pretty sure they hired me for this reason. Good luck to you, find a mission you want, a unit you like, and go for it!

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alwyn2d    12

Active Duty AF would be pretty much be out of the question. That would require an interservice transfer and the requirements are very restrictive. Check out the AF web site for the details.

http://www.afpc.randolph.af.mil/specfly/Tr...er/interser.htm.

Your best bet would be the AF Guard/Reserves as you stated. Plently of ex-Army flyers that have seen the light and made the transition. In order to fly in the AF, you need not wear 2 piece flight suits or war paint :). If you're going to fly, at least look like a pilot for crying out loud.

Seems like the Army is a good training ground for the AF. And remember the AF is rich in History, Aviation bonuses (active duty only), Per Diem and Crew Rest.

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Guest Eng30   
Guest Eng30

I am a load and was accepted to become a Nav. I was 33 when I applied and my unit went for an age waiver. It has been one year and I was turned down at the Pentagon level. They cited age as a factor, we knew that! They also cited career progression and medical. I passed all of my flight physicals but have a hearing waiver. Does anyone know of the regulation that gives the matrix for how they determine gates and retainability?

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Guest OldHercNav   
Guest OldHercNav

I have worked with several Nav candidates though the Guard Bureau. I have had some get ETP's approved for age but those have been for people under 32 ( by the time the class starts) and had no other issues ( like a medical waiver).

The reg is AFI 36-2205. Chapter 1 lists the requirements. Attachment 2 deals with age waivers. Keep in mind that unless you meet the strict requirements for an age waiver ( in my experience, most do not) you are requesting an ETP (Exception to Policy) for age. It is written up similar to a waiver but must be signed at a higher level - it goes to USAF Chief of Staff for approval. If you have more specific questions, PM me.

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