Jump to content
rotorguy

Can anyone give recent FC1/MFS Experience?

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone, 

I recently got back from my trip to Wright-Patterson and I could not be happier with my experience there. Not everything was smooth sailing for me, as far as my pre-existing eye condition was concerned, but the folks there went incredibly far out of their way to ensure I had every opportunity to pass their tests. For that, I am extremely grateful for their care in what they do and ultimately, allowing me to pursue my dream. 

A little bit about my experience: I had an eye muscle disorder that I discovered a few years ago after preemptively visiting an optometrist to make sure everything with my eyes were kosher. Upon finding out what I had, I was crushed. Over the course of the next year, I found a specialist, explained to him what my intentions were as far as pursuing this career and ended up having surgery to correct the problem. The surgery went very well, but that still did little to unease the unsettling feeling I had about my chances.  I read numerous stories about others who had similar conditions; I read the AFI's, waiverability guide and medical publications; I even messaged a few professionals on these very forums to gain as much insight as possible. From all of these sources, my confidence on passing was extremely low. 

Nevertheless, I continued to interview all over the country in pursuit of my passion, even with that overwhelming sense of uncertainty. The last few years have been the most trying test of my endurance, mentally. I spent thousands of dollars travelling for interviews, faced numerous rejections, put off career advancement in my fall back career, all for just the chance at a shot for my dream job. I knew, at least for me, that if I had not done this, it would plague me for the rest of my life knowing I had given up. 

I had engulfed myself with everything there was to know about my condition and how it would be measured/tested. I ascertained that my biggest hurdle was going to be depth perception, as is for most people, even with the best of eyes. I am prior enlisted and have had a history of failing the depth perception years back at MEPS. I spent months researching techniques people use to train their eyes to pass the test to include purchasing the Magic Eye book, as many of you have recommended. Even so, I was still not confident come judgement day that I was indeed going to pass. 

Once arriving on day one, you are not given an exact itinerary on what order you will be accomplishing all the tests, so I sat there stewing in the inevitable encounter with my kryptonite. It ended up coming relatively soon on the first day and it was not pleasant. I had measured 20/20 uncorrected, but come time to do the depth perception, I could not seem to make it work for me. This revelation that my hopes and dreams just came to an end began to sink in. Nevertheless, they had me do a full workup with the optometrist there to figure out what my underlying problem was. 

We went over many more eye tests and had very long, comprehensive talks about what they were seeing, what my chances/options were, what their role is as far as having a standardized approach in measuring/testing applicants. All of these things really did a great job at putting me at ease. It was the kind and length of talks from a doctor that no civilian doctor, at least in my experience, has taken out of their day to explain exactly what is going on. They made it abundantly clear that they will do everything in their power to ensure you have every opportunity to demonstrate that if you CAN pass, they will pass you. 

They ended up prescribing me glasses to retake the exam about mid-way through day two to see if it was simply an acuity problem not being able to see depth perception. I wore the glasses for a few minutes, retook the test, and failed again. This, again, made my stomach turn upside down. I was then given the advice to wear the glasses for a little while longer to have my eyes adjust some more. 

Day 3: Nearly everyone I was there with had already been given the all clear, having a great time touring the museum there (which is a must). I knew it was my make or break day. I wore the glasses the entire night before and also woke up early in the morning on day three to walk around outside to get my eyes readjusted. I had found out that walking around outside, particularly looking about 3 feet in front of me when walking, seemed to have the most of an effect on my eyes. 

First thing in the morning, we began to do some more evaluations with some easier to see depth perception tests that they had there. These tests were rated at much higher arcs than the standard needed to pass, but were instrumental in helping me with the technique that best worked for me to bring them out. Personally, I found out that opening my eyes up wide, as opposed to squinting (which I was doing before), and vaguely starring at the entire block of circles was working for me. 

Miraculously enough, I eventually got to the point to where I could legitimately see all the way through line D. (This was quite the emotional roller-coaster for me at this point). I was incredibly excited at this point that the future that I thought I had lost was slowly coming back to me. However, I was not quite out of the woods. Even though I had gotten through line D, it was a struggle, to say the least. The doctors had long talks with me about their standards and liability they assume by making such decisions and it was in mine, and their best interest, to ensure that this was not a one-time thing. They needed to be certain when you leave there, that you are going to be able to pass it every year after that. 

They had me do a few more depth perception tests (and passed) and more workups with multiple other doctors and they came to the agreement that I met their standards. I cannot describe to you what the feeling of years of doubt being immediately lifted off of my shoulders felt like. 

I am so extremely grateful for the doctors and techs there at Wright-Patterson for taking so much time to work with me through all of this!

Thank you so much!!

To those out there still in the hunt or awaiting your turn at MFS/FC1, never give up! Be as prepared as possible. Make appointments on your own so there are no surprises. If you find a surprise, get a second opinion. Research every option. Above all, remain calm and be as polite as possible. I know the former is easier said than done, but it can truly help. 

Good luck to everyone! 

  • Upvote 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bb17    96
1 hour ago, BEEPBEEPIMINAJEEP said:

 Above all, remain calm and be as polite as possible.

Congrats on getting through that! Just like most things in like, having the right attitude really helps. My personal opinion is that they were slightly more lenient on people that obviously had the right attitude. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sforron    36
2 hours ago, BEEPBEEPIMINAJEEP said:

 

As someone who also failed the depth perception test at MEPS (but knows that I do, in fact, have the required depth perception thanks to a trip to a civilian doc), it's very reassuring to hear that the docs at Wright-Pat are there to help you, rather than weed you out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BEEPBEEPIMINAJEEP said:

Hello everyone, 

I recently got back from my trip to Wright-Patterson and I could not be happier with my experience there. Not everything was smooth sailing for me, as far as my pre-existing eye condition was concerned, but the folks there went incredibly far out of their way to ensure I had every opportunity to pass their tests. For that, I am extremely grateful for their care in what they do and ultimately, allowing me to pursue my dream. 

A little bit about my experience: I had an eye muscle disorder that I discovered a few years ago after preemptively visiting an optometrist to make sure everything with my eyes were kosher. Upon finding out what I had, I was crushed. Over the course of the next year, I found a specialist, explained to him what my intentions were as far as pursuing this career and ended up having surgery to correct the problem. The surgery went very well, but that still did little to unease the unsettling feeling I had about my chances.  I read numerous stories about others who had similar conditions; I read the AFI's, waiverability guide and medical publications; I even messaged a few professionals on these very forums to gain as much insight as possible. From all of these sources, my confidence on passing was extremely low. 

Nevertheless, I continued to interview all over the country in pursuit of my passion, even with that overwhelming sense of uncertainty. The last few years have been the most trying test of my endurance, mentally. I spent thousands of dollars travelling for interviews, faced numerous rejections, put off career advancement in my fall back career, all for just the chance at a shot for my dream job. I knew, at least for me, that if I had not done this, it would plague me for the rest of my life knowing I had given up. 

I had engulfed myself with everything there was to know about my condition and how it would be measured/tested. I ascertained that my biggest hurdle was going to be depth perception, as is for most people, even with the best of eyes. I am prior enlisted and have had a history of failing the depth perception years back at MEPS. I spent months researching techniques people use to train their eyes to pass the test to include purchasing the Magic Eye book, as many of you have recommended. Even so, I was still not confident come judgement day that I was indeed going to pass. 

Once arriving on day one, you are not given an exact itinerary on what order you will be accomplishing all the tests, so I sat there stewing in the inevitable encounter with my kryptonite. It ended up coming relatively soon on the first day and it was not pleasant. I had measured 20/20 uncorrected, but come time to do the depth perception, I could not seem to make it work for me. This revelation that my hopes and dreams just came to an end began to sink in. Nevertheless, they had me do a full workup with the optometrist there to figure out what my underlying problem was. 

We went over many more eye tests and had very long, comprehensive talks about what they were seeing, what my chances/options were, what their role is as far as having a standardized approach in measuring/testing applicants. All of these things really did a great job at putting me at ease. It was the kind and length of talks from a doctor that no civilian doctor, at least in my experience, has taken out of their day to explain exactly what is going on. They made it abundantly clear that they will do everything in their power to ensure you have every opportunity to demonstrate that if you CAN pass, they will pass you. 

They ended up prescribing me glasses to retake the exam about mid-way through day two to see if it was simply an acuity problem not being able to see depth perception. I wore the glasses for a few minutes, retook the test, and failed again. This, again, made my stomach turn upside down. I was then given the advice to wear the glasses for a little while longer to have my eyes adjust some more. 

Day 3: Nearly everyone I was there with had already been given the all clear, having a great time touring the museum there (which is a must). I knew it was my make or break day. I wore the glasses the entire night before and also woke up early in the morning on day three to walk around outside to get my eyes readjusted. I had found out that walking around outside, particularly looking about 3 feet in front of me when walking, seemed to have the most of an effect on my eyes. 

First thing in the morning, we began to do some more evaluations with some easier to see depth perception tests that they had there. These tests were rated at much higher arcs than the standard needed to pass, but were instrumental in helping me with the technique that best worked for me to bring them out. Personally, I found out that opening my eyes up wide, as opposed to squinting (which I was doing before), and vaguely starring at the entire block of circles was working for me. 

Miraculously enough, I eventually got to the point to where I could legitimately see all the way through line D. (This was quite the emotional roller-coaster for me at this point). I was incredibly excited at this point that the future that I thought I had lost was slowly coming back to me. However, I was not quite out of the woods. Even though I had gotten through line D, it was a struggle, to say the least. The doctors had long talks with me about their standards and liability they assume by making such decisions and it was in mine, and their best interest, to ensure that this was not a one-time thing. They needed to be certain when you leave there, that you are going to be able to pass it every year after that. 

They had me do a few more depth perception tests (and passed) and more workups with multiple other doctors and they came to the agreement that I met their standards. I cannot describe to you what the feeling of years of doubt being immediately lifted off of my shoulders felt like. 

I am so extremely grateful for the doctors and techs there at Wright-Patterson for taking so much time to work with me through all of this!

Thank you so much!!

To those out there still in the hunt or awaiting your turn at MFS/FC1, never give up! Be as prepared as possible. Make appointments on your own so there are no surprises. If you find a surprise, get a second opinion. Research every option. Above all, remain calm and be as polite as possible. I know the former is easier said than done, but it can truly help. 

Good luck to everyone! 

Regarding the vision tests, this is the best advice anyone can offer.  If you want to be a pilot, your eye exam at Wright-Patt is the most important eye exam of your life.  Prepare for it.  Get examined by a civilian or military doc and figure out if there is ANYTHING wrong with your eyes.  If so, fix it if at all possible.  I can assure you that if BEEPBEEP had not be so proactive, he would not be heading to UPT today.  His work ethic and attitude was the difference in passing and failing.  Obviously, some things are not within one's control, but give yourself the best chance possible.  

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished at Wright-Patt. The technicians and doctors were all friendly and helpful. My group started Monday and was finished by Tuesday by 1400. Most of the tests were concerned with eye health. Day one was EKG, teeth, medical history, the first half of the eye tests, and computer based testing. Second day we did lab work, eyes dilated, height-weight, flight doc, and the second half of the eye tests. Most people in my group were doing additional testing for various issues.

Things that I wish I knew before hand:

  • There are two building 840s. Lodging is located in area A. Your FC1 will take place in building 840 in Area B. 
  • For sure get a rental car. There was plenty of time to explore Dayton and I'm glad I had my own transportation. 

Advice from this forum that I found helpful:

  • Take your time on the eye tests.
  • Read as much as you can so you limit the amount of surprises.

I hope some of this information was helpful. Best of luck to everyone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sforron    36

Does anyone know if, as a civilian who has just been scheduled for an FC1, I am eligible to only do the MFS portion if I have a recent IFS? I had the full IFS done at Tyndall a few weeks ago, not eager for another day of achingly dilated eyes and stress.

I know the answer may well be "shut up and color," but I figured I'd ask.

Edited by sforron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mb1685    31

Silly question that might have already been answered but I'm having trouble finding more info: what exactly are the differences between an IFC1 and MFS? What additional tests are conducted during MFS?

Also, I'm assuming that for Guard applicants/selects, already having an approved IFC1 before selection doesn't preclude the need to go to MFS, correct?

Edited by mb1685

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tk1313    241
33 minutes ago, sforron said:

Does anyone know if, as a civilian who has just been scheduled for an FC1, I am eligible to only do the MFS portion if I have a recent IFS? I had the full IFS done at Tyndall a few weeks ago, not eager for another day of achingly dilated eyes and stress.

I know the answer may well be "shut up and color," but I figured I'd ask.

Get your paperwork from the IFS. It should say something like "only MFS required" or something like that if I remember correctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sforron said:

Does anyone know if, as a civilian who has just been scheduled for an FC1, I am eligible to only do the MFS portion if I have a recent IFS? 

If you have a DD2808 stamped saying "Medically Qualified for FCI Pending Successful Completion of MFS" you will not need to do another FCI.

1 hour ago, mb1685 said:

Silly question that might have already been answered but I'm having trouble finding more info: what exactly are the differences between an IFC1 and MFS? What additional tests are conducted during MFS?

Also, I'm assuming that for Guard applicants/selects, already having an approved IFC1 before selection doesn't preclude the need to go to MFS, correct?

http://www.wpafb.af.mil/Welcome/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/853108/usafsam-fci-medical-flight-screening/

All info at the link. An FCI is no good if it is stamped "pending successful completion of MFS."

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mb1685    31
9 minutes ago, Sit On Acorns said:

If you have a DD2808 stamped saying "Medically Qualified for FCI Pending Successful Completion of MFS" you will not need to do another FCI.

http://www.wpafb.af.mil/Welcome/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/853108/usafsam-fci-medical-flight-screening/

All info at the link. An FCI is no good if it is stamped "pending successful completion of MFS."

 

Awesome, thanks so much for that info! My IFC1 wasn't too long ago so I haven't heard back yet or gotten a DD2808. I'm a weird case -- CSO select for AD, continuing to apply for a Pilot gig with some Guard units up until my OTS date. I explained the situation to the Flight Medicine folks and they're upgrading my IFC1A to IFC1 (given that I meet those standards) and I was curious as to whether that might be something that Guard units might find a little bit desirable or whether it would make any difference at all in regards to the MFS requirement. I guess in theory it shows that I've been through a more stringent layer of medical screening that an applicant who's only been through MEPS (or nothing) and perhaps I'm slightly less of a gamble, but I understand that it means pretty much nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a little difficult to explain the differences between IFC I and MFS.  Some of the differences are historical.  For example, the IFC I does not require a corneal topography.  That is because decades ago, corneal topography was not readily available.  Thus, it was done at Brooks (now Wright-Patt) as part of the MFS.  Also, the MFS includes color vision and red lens testing as part of the eye exam.  I believe that was due to the fact that there was some inconsistency on how these tests were being administered at the local bases so they decided to have them done as part of the MFS.  Finally, there is a computer based "Neuro-psych" test that is part of MFS simply because the testing software was not available anywhere but the ACS (Brooks/Wright-Patt) or the USAFA. 

If you've had an IFC I completed at your local base, you will come to Wright-Patt for the MFS (Medical Flight Screening) exam.  Generally, this will consist of the items listed above.  You will almost never have your eyes dilated.  However, if there are any questions lingering from your IFC I exam, they will be re-evaluated at Wright-Patt, including dilation in rare cases.

Most folks have a combined IFC I/MFS done at either Wright-Patt or USAFA.  It's typically the OTS folks who come for a MFS only.

Let me know if you want more info.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mb1685    31
1 hour ago, stuckindayton said:

It's a little difficult to explain the differences between IFC I and MFS.  Some of the differences are historical.  For example, the IFC I does not require a corneal topography.  That is because decades ago, corneal topography was not readily available.  Thus, it was done at Brooks (now Wright-Patt) as part of the MFS.  Also, the MFS includes color vision and red lens testing as part of the eye exam.  I believe that was due to the fact that there was some inconsistency on how these tests were being administered at the local bases so they decided to have them done as part of the MFS.  Finally, there is a computer based "Neuro-psych" test that is part of MFS simply because the testing software was not available anywhere but the ACS (Brooks/Wright-Patt) or the USAFA. 

If you've had an IFC I completed at your local base, you will come to Wright-Patt for the MFS (Medical Flight Screening) exam.  Generally, this will consist of the items listed above.  You will almost never have your eyes dilated.  However, if there are any questions lingering from your IFC I exam, they will be re-evaluated at Wright-Patt, including dilation in rare cases.

Most folks have a combined IFC I/MFS done at either Wright-Patt or USAFA.  It's typically the OTS folks who come for a MFS only.

Let me know if you want more info.

Thank you! I greatly appreciate it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tk1313    241

The people are Wright-Patt are honestly there for you. Every time I overheard a conversation about someone who had failed a test, the docs/techs were trying to figure out the best way to proceed that would most help the candidate. It was never negative. The only reason you will fail there or need a waiver is if you legitimately have an issue that is proved with multiple tests. Like DillonStewart said:
The first day was EKG, hearing, teeth X-rays, medical history, the first half of the eye tests (depth perception like at MEPS, eye pressure, some field of vision test with a red light and a filter that will show it as one red and one white light), and computer based testing (don't be like me, drink some coffee before the computer testing even though it "doesn't count").
The second day was an hour at the lab (for urinalysis, blood work, and chest X-rays), then back to the main building for height/weight, seated height(s), second half of the eye tests (color vision, detailed eye pictures/scans, near and far vision, then finally a ophthalmologist visually examines your eyes), eyes dilation (if you pass all the other eye testing), and finally a couple extra quick vision tests with dilated eyes before you go see the flight doctor to be cleared (again, assuming you passed everything else).

Some advice:
1. 
Don't take your phone into the hearing test booth... You will hear loud static during the beeps which makes it nearly impossible to hear the beeps and/or the beeps will be replaced by a cricket-like noise. I somehow passed even though my phone was constantly going off, but an ROTC kid also brought his phone into the booth, and the test tech had to stop the test because he was doing so bad. They both figured out it was his phone, and he left it outside the next time.
2. Take your time! It's been said before, and it's worth re-stating. I think the only test that is timed is the color vision. For some reason I felt the depth perception was just slightly harder at Wright-Patt than it was at MEPS (still passed "F"). I basically took my head out of the fixture and focused on various points near and far to me if I was even a little unsure. I was re-assured that I was doing great, and I pressed on.
3. Google "USAFSAM", and maps should point you to exactly the building. I didn't have an issue finding it, but a lot of people do.

Day 3 group:
Most of the group was let out a little after 12 noon on the second day (Tuesday). I had to stay until Wednesday because of my cup/disk ratio. The ophthalmologist basically said, "You just picked out the lenses that didn't give any correction and read off of the 20/15 line quickly and perfectly, you don't have an issue." He then proceeded to tell me only 3 out of all the people who had come to Wright-Patt actually had an issue, and that they knew they had an issue way beforehand. You have to do a field of vision test that isn't fun, and take 3 eye pressure readings... It's an extra couple hours the next day, but you get to fly for the Air Force, so all-in-all it's not a big deal. 

Side note: When they were confirming my medical history, something came up that I said I wasn't aware of. It basically boiled down to a request for a follow-up appointment that I didn't go to after being given pills for being sick (not anything major) because (1) I wasn't e-mailed and told that I needed to follow-up (the clinic had an e-mail system they used for anything and everything) and (2) Once I was given anti-biotics, I felt much better within about a week. The flight doc will iron everything out like he did with me, so no need to panic.

Good luck to everyone going to Wrigh-Patt for FCI. Enjoy Dayton, and talk/hang out with the other guys/gals there since you'll be close for the next couple of days and might possibly see some of them in later training.

Edited by tk1313
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, tk1313 said:



2. Take your time! It's been said before, and it's worth re-stating. I think the only test that is timed is the color vision. 

TK,

 

Thanks for the feedback.  All good info.  To add some commentary....

The color test is time limited, however, your time is not "graded."  It's pass or fail.  Do not rush to try and pass as that will only hurt you.  You have up to four seconds to respond.  Use it to get the correct answer.

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Sit On Acorns said:

Has anyone only needed to do the MFS? Curious how the experience differs if you already have your FCI.

It was explained earlier on this page (about four posts up).  The biggest difference is MFS is usually only one day vs. 2-4 four IFC I.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sforron    36

Question re: the FC1, the information I was given said that for civilians / those without uniforms, the attire is conservative business attire. To me, this means a suit and tie, but that seems a bit much for medical exams and when everyone else is wearing ABUs. Am I going to be OK showing up in khakis and a polo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, sforron said:

Question re: the FC1, the information I was given said that for civilians / those without uniforms, the attire is conservative business attire. To me, this means a suit and tie, but that seems a bit much for medical exams and when everyone else is wearing ABUs. Am I going to be OK showing up in khakis and a polo?

Yes, without question.  No need for a suit and tie.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Civilian question-

   Is there anyway for a civilian to set up an FC1 without a recruiter? looking to go unsposnored and the regs say that I'll need to meet FC1 standards, but I can't get any further information from the recruiter to get the ball rolling. 

Edited by Hopefulflyer389

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sforron    36
On 2/5/2014 at 8:06 AM, ball12 said:

I had my IFC1 a few weeks ago down at WPAFB. I'm just wondering if anyone can shed some light on the process for approval after you leave WPAFB? The Flight Doc down there said everything looked good and I didn't need any waivers. I'm just curious if that is a guarantee I passed, or are there doctors at AETC that go through and review your chart? From what I could gather from the techs down at WP, if you leave without needing a waiver then you passed. Any thoughts from someone with some inside knowledge of the process?

 

 

From personal experience, you can submit your package to the AFRC board without having an FC1 done. You just need to have passed MEPS. So if you're unsponsored, I think the process would be MEPS -> Board selection -> FC1.

When I left WP last week I still had a few tests without results, so I guess if I come back with sickle cell I'm screwed, but other than that yes, you generally know when you leave WP without any issues that you've passed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FlatSpin    6

Went to WP a few weeks ago. Just to reiterate, this thread is GOLD. I highly recommend everyone read it from start to finish before going. My experience went exactly as others described it. I only have a few items to add.

1. Get a rental car. The main medical office and the lab work are in two separate buildings on two separate AF bases (about 15 mins apart). Day one doesn't really matter but day two is when it pays off. After lab work, people trickle over to the main building and start on whatever tests they have remaining. Having a car allows you to beat the rush and get your tests done first. Also, if your lab results or xrays need to be redone, you will be required to travel back and forth between the two bases. All in all, it was money well spent. I can say with confidence that the car allowed me to finish up and go home a few days early.

2. Bring lots of snacks. On both days, my first meal was burger king around 1400. If someone had brought lots of food for the group, they would have been my hero.

3. They assign the group a room to hang out in and you spend most of your time here. Cell signal is hit or miss and you run out of things to talk about quickly so most of the time is spent sitting in silence and envying those that brought a book. There is a TV and DVD player however so if you bring a movie or xbox or something, everyone will thank you.

4. Go to the air museum. I have been to aviation museums all over the country and this one is by far the best. We budgeted 5 hours to see the whole thing and still missed out on two hangers. This is another good reason to have a car.

5. If you use your phone for directions, it will get you close but not to the right building. See attached.

5. No prostate exam. Rejoice! You wont get your oil checked on this trip.

All in all it was a great experience. There were 30 of us and everyone passed. Only two people were iffy and the only reason they were under the microscope was due to their own self disclosure. I urge everyone to please keep your mouth shut when they ask the questions like "any history of _______" or "have you ever experienced _________". Let them find out for themselves. If you already incriminated yourself during MEPS then start working on your defenses because they will dig deep into those things at WP.

Have fun. Good Luck. See you at UPT.

WP.JPG

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
extender10    13

Figure I'll chip in since I went mid-June. 

I am off the street/civlian - Travis travelpay/CTO was great and got me through O'Hare to Dayton no problem. I had to change flights home twice and it was no problem.

If you're not prior-service - you likely WILL NOT be in the on-base billeting hotel.  There is a hotel just outside the gate called the Sunset Inn that you'll be at with other Reserve/Guard baby types.  I found this out at 2am after trying to check in at on-base billeting (Wright Patterson Inn).

My hotel room was great - I didn't eat breakfast there (I had to fast multiple days) but everything else was great.

I'm 22 so meeting some ROTC people near my age was awesome - also the ANG/Reserve applicants I met were great too - I even met somebody who was also hired to fly KC-10s in the squadron across the building from me.

My group was about 75%/25% ROTC and Reserve/ANG sponsored UPT people.  Our liaison was incredibly nice - we had like 30 VHS movies to choose from (Bond, Indiana Jones, We Were Soldiers, even some Disney classics I think haha) and freedom to get food off or on base when time allowed between appointments.  

The biggest thing to remember is attitude.  You will be rushed from little office to little office to check things off on your appointment cover sheet.  But, it's all in the interest of time and I found that everybody (even the grumpier seeming ones) were focused on helping you get a checkmark and leave on time.  I got extra coaching on things like the PFT and depth perception if I asked and had a good attitude.  

In the weeks prior I joked to my friends and family that I'd be fine unless "I had some heart thing I didn't know about" and SURE ENOUGH they found something on my EKG.  I had to wear a Haltor monitor (like a vest of sensors for 24hrs) and do an echocardiogram AND treadmill stress test.  I ended up being there until Thursday afternoon.  I had a good attitude and kept my stress levels down and didn't stay up googling waiver reqs and statistics and focused on learning what I could from my flight doc and specialists.  I ended up getting waived for PVC's/arrythmia.  I'm so grateful for them taking care of me - especially when 25 others were breezing through their tests and heading home.  

Found out later that my waiver was a actually a tough one to pass - so remember attitudes and impressions as well as being able to talk about your medical history comfortably will get you over some hurdles.

 

Edited by extender10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sforron    36

Anyone know what the turnaround time is lately? I'm at six weeks and still radio silence, with nothing but a Lasik waiver to complicate things.

Edit: Just got the call from my recruiter an hour ago that I've been approved. So just under 6 full weeks turnaround time.

Edited by sforron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SkydiveMike    2

Anyone have any info on the current timeline for FC1 physicals? I.E. from when the recruiter requests an exam date to getting notification of exam date, wait time till the exam date, wait time to find out the results with a waiver, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×