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The Kayla

RAF Lakenheath/Mildenhall info

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Hi!

So, Mildenhall might be our new home coming up this summer.

Some questions to anyone who has ever been stationed there:

  1. What is base housing like? Do you get to "pick" which housing you're in? (meaning: I've heard that there are a total of three bases with housing available). Dave has seen Lakenheath housing (and liked it). His friend was stationed at Mildenhall. Thoughts/opinions? Obviously, I completely understand if Lakenheath peeps have first dibs on their housing over Mildenhall peeps.
  2. I JUST read that importing pets changed their rules (as of Jan 4th 2012!). Has anyone traveled with their pets overseas? I know the general gist of taking care of the animal(s), but I'm curious about the ass pain associated with traveling w/pets. Also, Anyone know how, um, "nice" the housing office is about waiving the 2-pet policy? We have three dogs... so I don't have the option of saying "Two dogs.." if I had two dogs and a cat or two.
  3. All and all: What is something you wished someone told you about moving to the UK? If you could change anything, what would it be? What did you absolutely love/hate about being over there?

When we get orders (God willing they don't fall through!) I'm planning to spend NYE in Scotland! :)

Thanks!

Kayla

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I can't help you with #2 and it's been a while since I left, but here's some info for you

1. What is base housing like? Do you get to "pick" which housing you're in? (meaning: I've heard that there are a total of three bases with housing available). Dave has seen Lakenheath housing (and liked it). His friend was stationed at Mildenhall. Thoughts/opinions?

Do NOT get base housing! First off, much of base housing is not actually on base - when we were there, there was housing that was as far as 10 miles from base. The houses in England are small, and the base houses are no excepion. The only real advantage to being on base is that the outlets are 110V. There was a fairly new set of houses in (I think) Thetford that were actually pretty nice, but once you're on the housing list, you have to take what they give you based on availability and your rank. If you turn down an on-base house, the clock starts ticking on how long you have to rent a house.

If you do want to live on base, Lakenheath and Mildenhall share many facilities, so there shouldn't be any difference for housing priority in being stationed at one place over the other.

Most importantly, living off base lets you experience more of England - being within walking distance from the god pubs is always a must!

3. All and all: What is something you wished someone told you about moving to the UK? If you could change anything, what would it be? What did you absolutely love/hate about being over there?

A couple pieces of advice:

- Ship your car and pack out as early as possible. As soon as you think you can do without your car stateside and have your household goods packed, do it. It can take up to a couple months for that stuff to get over. You will be given three separate pickups - one for household goods, one for "hold baggage" (several hundred pounds that goes via air and arrives quicker) and the stuff you put in storage. As far as cars to bring over, don't listen to people who say that larger cars won't fit - not true. We brought over an SUV and there are plenty of folks who bring over F150s, Expeditions,etc. They're not a problem on the roads, but sometimes it is a tight squeeze in the parking lots. If you have a second car, that will be on your dime to ship it.

- Measure your furniture. With the houses being smaller, you may look at houses that have rooms where your stuff might not fit. When you're looking at houses, also consider the doors and hallways (which are also small) to see if you can fit the larger stuff through. I've heard stories of folks who had to cut king-size box springs in half in order to get them up spiral staircases to a second floor bedroom.

- Storage: If you can do without it for three years, leave it behind.

-- Put your large furniture in storage. We put our guest bedset, formal dining room set, and entertainment center into storage and it was a good thing we did. As I mentioned, the houses are very small, and it's tough to find places that will fit large furniture. We have minimal room in our bedroom with the bedset and dressers.

-- Put your extra clothes in storage. The British houses don't have closets, though you'll get a few shrunks from the furniture office (two for each military member and one per dependant). Each shrunk is only a few feet wide, so there's not a whole lot of room for extra. Definitely bring a couple warm jackets, though.

-- Put your small 110V appliances (stuff that costs less than about $30) and appliances with motors (vacuums, washer/dryer, microwave) in storage. Anything that is not dual voltage needs to run off one of the bulky transformer that furniture office will give you. Even if it is dual voltage or running off a transformer, the difference in volts/amps will eventually burn out the motors.

As far as the good and bad, we loved most everything about being over there, but particularly the travel. Take advantage of the cheap airlines (Ryan Air, Easy Jet) and see as much of Europe as you can. For living, Newmarket, Cambridge, and Bury St Edmunds were popular locations with nice towns and a good nightlife (Cambridge more so of the three). They're all roughly south of the bases, but the first two are closer to London and the airports.

That's what I can remember off the top of my nugget, but if you've got any more specific questions, I may be able to think back a decade and give you some answers.

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Thanks!!

We plan on living off base-- for year two and three. Dave wants us to live on base the first year to adjust to living there, find a nice neighborhood, etc etc. We'll see though! :)

Thank you for the info about taking SUVs... we have a Yukon, and we were just going to sell it. What are your thoughts/opinions about driving in a left seat when everything is right seated? That's our biggest worry/fear.

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Big '2' on living off base. I understand being nervous about it at first, but ask yourselves if you really want to go through the hassle of moving again after just a year. As far as the pets go, I've heard rumors that the quarantine is a thing of the past. It was still in effect when we PCS'd and we tried something called "pet scheme" that was supposed to allow us to do a sort of "pre-quarantine" so we wouldn't have to lock up the pets for 6 months when we got there. Problem was, the vet we used did one step out of order and the Brits didn't accept our paperwork. Whatever the current system is, make sure your documentation is perfect. As far as the vehicles go, a smaller LHD car is doable, but keep in mind that commutes will be along narrow country roads and it will be very diffucult to see around that JCB (tractor....they're all over the place in East Anglia) to pass from your seating position. If I had it to do over, I would've sold my US spec vehicles beforehand and stuck with RHD. If you have kids, consider looking in Ely. Nice village, not too far from base or Cambridge and you can get more space for the money. It will still be much smaller than what you are used to though....just be prepared to adapt your standards and live like the locals. Sans kids, live in Cambridge. Big picture, nothing compares to living overseas. There will be inconviences but if you go in with an open mind it has the potential to be a few of the best years of your life.

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Hoss: Great point about moving 3x in 3yrs.. I didn't think of it like that!

We have one skin-monster... I heard that schools there start at age 3? Gunnar may/may not be old enough to worry about schools and what have you (he'll be almost a year when we PCS). Dates/ages are giving me a hard time. Hell, I can hardly remember my age, let alone what year I was born in... to trying to figure out if Gunnar will be "of age" to have to worry about schools.. Oy.

Oh here's a question:

Thoughts/Opinions on buying a house over there? Due to us having three (LARGE) dogs... trying to find a place--ANYWHERE--is a b!tch. So, we've been kicked around the idea of just buying a house, and possibly using it as a rental property when we PCS.

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Let me put my 2 cents on the American car, sell it and just buy British Spec just because of the small roads and how it can get sporty if you go to pass on roads that were originally laid out by the Romans. Big Lories (18wheelers) and tractors,combines, are always on the roads around since most the land is agricultural, the steering on the RH just makes for safer driving(when in Rome). I don't know if the dealerships still do it over there but when your tour is up trade it in for a American spec that will be delivered at your next CONUS assignment or the stateside dealership of your choice. Also think if your American car is so so mechanical, the vehicle inspections over there are in depth and strict, just less hassle to buy British . Had a good road trip with a friend to Sweden, he bought a new Volvo in Mildenhall and saved allot of quid by taking the ferry over from Ipswich to Goteborg and picked it from the factory. It's a great assignment if you stay away from Yanks on your off duty time and go native, my favorite pub close to Mildenhall was Judes Ferry in West Row, but it has been awhile since I have taken a tanker TDY there.

Hoss: Great point about moving 3x in 3yrs.. I didn't think of it like that!

We have one skin-monster... I heard that schools there start at age 3? Gunnar may/may not be old enough to worry about schools and what have you (he'll be almost a year when we PCS). Dates/ages are giving me a hard time. Hell, I can hardly remember my age, let alone what year I was born in... to trying to figure out if Gunnar will be "of age" to have to worry about schools.. Oy.

Oh here's a question:

Thoughts/Opinions on buying a house over there? Due to us having three (LARGE) dogs... trying to find a place--ANYWHERE--is a b!tch. So, we've been kicked around the idea of just buying a house, and possibly using it as a rental property when we PCS.

Brits love their dogs better than their children so think long and hard if you want to bring them over, they don't put up with Yanks who they think abuse their animals from THEIR POINT OF VIEW.

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Live off base. No reason whatsoever to need a year to "adjust" to ENGLAND. Amazingly, the people speak ENGLISH. Just like you and me they eat with forks, count on their fingers, and like puppies. Depending on what kind of commute you want and how close you want to have the conviences you are used to, I'd look at Cambridge, Bury St. Edmunds, and Newmarket first - those are larger towns that will have things you are used to like supermarkets, conveince stores, and department stores. Lots of charming villages closer to base, but they won't have anything more than a pub and a post office.

You can drive an American spec car easily enough, but you do have pay for the adjustments you have to make them street legal. Roads are different over there though - in general rural roads are more narrow and will have tall hedges that block curves. Gas is more expensive too, so getting a British spec VW or Rover that gets 45 mpg might end up saving you thousands of dollars vs. bringing over your SUV. I bought a 4-door when I got there for around $3K off the lemon lot, then sold it when I PCS'd a year later for $2700. The lemon lot will be FULL of cars for you to chose from, in addition to the local dealerships.

The one thing I wish I knew when I went there? Your only 22 - and single - and living in the UK - and making a shit ton of cash (relative to a college student) - with no responsiblities at work - once in your life: DON'T SPEND YOUR WEEKENDS AT HOME.

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Kayla

I live in Cambridge (and once lived in Newmarket), so if you have any general questions that require good local knowledge then I would be happy to help.

Steve

Live off base. No reason whatsoever to need a year to "adjust" to ENGLAND. Amazingly, the people speak ENGLISH. Just like you and me they eat with forks, count on their fingers, and like puppies.

We do all have yellow/rotten teeth, though. That's got to take some adjusting to.

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Kayla,

The rules for brining in dogs did change on 1 Jan, here's the website that details what you have to do http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-pets/pets/travel/pets/pet-owners/ The only thing to double check is that you get international microchips, which use a different standard than the US microchips most vets normally use. Our vet had the international ones in stock, we just had to ask for them.

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Let me put my 2 cents on the American car, sell it and just buy British Spec just because of the small roads and how it can get sporty if you go to pass on roads that were originally laid out by the Romans. Big Lories (18wheelers) and tractors,combines, are always on the roads around since most the land is agricultural, the steering on the RH just makes for safer driving(when in Rome). I don't know if the dealerships still do it over there but when your tour is up trade it in for a American spec that will be delivered at your next CONUS assignment or the stateside dealership of your choice. Also think if your American car is so so mechanical, the vehicle inspections over there are in depth and strict, just less hassle to buy British . Had a good road trip with a friend to Sweden, he bought a new Volvo in Mildenhall and saved allot of quid by taking the ferry over from Ipswich to Goteborg and picked it from the factory. It's a great assignment if you stay away from Yanks on your off duty time and go native, my favorite pub close to Mildenhall was Judes Ferry in West Row, but it has been awhile since I have taken a tanker TDY there.

Solid advice here. On the main roads and highways over there, a normal sized American car will be just fine, but on all the backroads (and believe me there are a LOT of backroads), a narrower car is much better. Some of the roads are barely the width of one car with hedgerows on either side. Additionally, like Prosuper mentioned, having your steering wheel on the right side is definitely safer.

edit for grammar

Edited by Seriously

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I was at Alconbury but it is not far from Moldyhole. We lived off base in the village of Aclonbury Weston in a 385 year old house called Grange Farm. It was awesome. Do not live on base unless you have to.

The village was great. We had a great local pub and the best butcher shop I've ever seen...once I figured out when the hours of operations were (actually, it seemed so random I never really figured it out but I did stop in whenever I saw they were open). The thing about living "on the economy" is you have to get used to the fact that the Brits are 40 years behind and working half days to catch up when it comes to some things like the butcher shop I described.

Overall I would say we had an outstanding experience and we made some lifelong British friends, including our community midwife (we had a child born in a British hospital and it was a fantastic experience) and her husband who happened to be an RAF F-1 pilot.

I sold my cars before I went over there because everyone told me the roads were too narrow and I wouldn't be able to get parts. We got short notice orders (Desert Shield hurry up and get here before we actually deploy) and I panicked and sold our 2 year old Accord and my 1 year old full size Bronco. Big mistake. they would've both been fine and I ended up buying another Accord and a Mazda 626 that went through three engines in two years. The parking lot at the squadron was full of SUVs when I showed up the first day. I wish I had never sold my cars.

We left our 225lb St Bernard home in the States with my brother. I couldn't see locking a dog that size up for 6 months. It was a good call.

The time may be right to buy a house because of the exchange rate but I'm not sure about the current market over there. There were guys who PCSd out that made over $250k on their houses because they showed up when the dollar was strong and the housing market was weak. Most of the people I knew who owned houses when we shut the base down were in the oppostie scenario (bought with a weak dollar at the top of the market) and they simply had to walk away from their houses, leaving the keys and a note to the bank on the kitchen counter after the movers had their HHG packed and in the van. I never heard of anyone having that follow them credit wise back to the states but that was a long time ago and times may well have changed. So, it depends. There is some risk of losing whatever equity you invest up front, just like here.

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I'm at Lakenheath now on my second trip here. I will strongly echo the posts that say ship your stuff early, live off base, and buy a British car.

The DEFRA website linked above is a great resource for shipping pets. I shipped two large dogs (100 lb+ ea). I didn't have any trouble, but it wasn't cheap. PM me if you want specifics. Get started on that NOW though. You don't have to put them in a kennel here for 6 months, but it is still a 6 month process.

I brought a Ford Escape over here before. It was like driving an Expedition in the States. Certainly doable, but parking lots and back roads are a pain in the ass. My suggestion is have the AF ship your car and have your husband buy a used car from the lemon lot. You can then decide later which you prefer.

Don't live on base. The less you have to do with the housing office the better. They are not there to help you. They are a empire building organization with a bureaucracy that exists to save the taxpayers money at your expense. Yes, I'm a little bitter. Living off base means I have little to do with them. Also, getting base housing doesn't mean you'll live on base. You could find yourself living in a house off base provided for free. Additionally, there is old crappy housing that the base can't get rid of. There's a new push to get people to live there, so be prepared. They offer the crappy house to you, and if you refuse they turn off TLA and refuse to pay OHA. Which means rent is entirely on your own dime with no housing allotment. That effects the E-1 to E-6 crowd, but an O-2 or O-3 might get burned as well. Hopefully that housing surplus will be cleared out by the time you get here.

Check out www.rightmove.co.uk for a great house hunting resource. I second the recommendations for Bury St Edmunds and Cambridge. The further you get from base the more house you get for your money. I live half an hour from base and have a decent yard with a large house by American standards. My wife and I had committed to living out in the country though with our large dogs.

We've got a 2 year old girl who we send to British day care once or twice a week. When she turns 3 we can get a voucher to send her to a local school. We can also wait until she's normal school age and send her to the Kindergarten on base. Lakenheath has a normal American school system.

What I've found causes the most frustration for people is expecting it to be just like the US. While it is a first world Western country, they move at a slower pace than in the US with reduced hours. Don't expect to have companies falling over themselves to get your internet installed tomorrow or being able to go to Walmart to shop at midnight.

It's an awesome opportunity and it sounds like you're taking advantage of the great resources here. PM me if you have detailed questions.

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I haven't read all the replies here yet and my military info is a bit out of date, but I was stationed at Mildenhall 95-98, got out and stayed in the UK for the next 12 years so can offer a couple of points.

First piece of advice - put that American iron monster back on the market and pick up a used car when you get to the UK. Sure, it's fine on most of the roads, put try parking that beast in the middle of Bury or Cambridge and you'll wish you'd left in on your side of the oggin. ALL parking spaces in the UK are the width of a compact car +6 inches. If you even take a 2-door coupe, you'll struggle to get the door open far enough to get out. Practice going through the window. Used cars aren't cheap, but they can be found in great condition and, like everything else, you'll find there's a thriving market of those things between inbound and outbound mil folks.

Appliances - refridgerator. Leave yours behind. Unless you want to put it outside and be the redneck family in the village (Trans Am on blocks optional - see point above about American cars). It won't fit in 98% of British kitchens. Get used to a fridge/freezer about 2/3 the size of an American one. Same for washer and dryer. The UK units fit under the countertop in the kitchen and you can get a good used one for about £100. Dryers aren't quite so common due to space, but again, pick up a used one when you get there. Check all of your electronics - most are dual voltage these days and, if they are, will work just fine with a plug adapter. For most of the other stuff you can keep a transformer or two in the kitchen and bedrooms for things you can't live without but, again, most of the usual domestic stuff you can get used from outbound people or just on ebay.

TV - check that it is PAL capable. Many of them are multi-system these days, but if yours isn't, box it up or sell it (it'll be obsolete by the time you rotate back stateside, anyway).

Living on base - don't be so bloody daft! What's the point of going to a first-world overseas location if you're going to live in Little America? The other thing is that time will disappear around you over there so hit the ground running. Your first year will be up before you know it and you'll wonder what you were ever thinking about living onbase.

Live off base - no question. Especially go for some of the smaller villages where you may trade convenience for character and community, but it is a trade well worth making. They may not have the walking-access to shops (but they will ALL have a pub and, really, what more do you want?). I lived in Dalham for 2+ years and was the only American there at the time. After a few months, I was pulling pints behind the bar at The Affleck Arms and knew most everyone in the village. And they all treated me like gold. The housing stock is hugely varied from wicked cool and interesting (friends rented the old Mildenhall train station) to horrible little boxes on a postage stamp. On this issue, get some really, really good advice from someone in the area about buying versus renting. When I was there in the late 90s, finding rentals was a problem due short supply. Buying may well be a good idea now with the housing market tanked, but the prices will still make your eyes water once you convert to dollars. Think carefully and talk to a lot of people about it even before you leave. Don't waste time with a year on base to get used to it. Seriously?

School - not an issue until high school. Send your little one to the local school. It'll be a great way to meet local people and you'll all get a lot out of the experience. And don't be surprised if your tiny Yank develops a cute little English accent while you're there.

Dogs and renting? The Brits themselves love pointing out the irony that it is the "Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children" but it is the "ROYAL Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals". But that also means some snooty locals may stick their nose into how you handle your dogs, so be prepared for a little unwanted supervision on occassion just on the off chance you run into said snooty local.

General stuff:

Space in the house. There isn't any. Get used to it. To practice, buy a camping trailer and live in that for a few months. After that, a British house will seem cavernous. As an example, the NCO housing at Mildenhall, before we did some major renovations in the late 90s, had galley kitchens that were so narrow that you couldn't open the oven and the fridge at the same time. True.

Yards (gardens). Will be smaller than your current living room. Only useful for planting a few flowers in, really. British homes generally are really tightly packed. They would put a whole village, including pub, shop, and church, in the space of a normal American single family plot. But, the plus side of that is that there is still a lot of green space, especially in Suffolk around the bases, so you lose in your living space but you gain in your surroundings, if you know what I mean.

Britain does a lot of things differently than we do. That doesn't make it right or wrong, just different. Some of their bureauracracy will leave you stunned but you will have no choice but to succumb to it. The locals all do, they just know about it beforehand. They over-engineer the hell out of everything they touch but it usually works (except the electrics on a British car. 100 years of practice and they still can't get that right).

Money/commerce. Don't convert everything in your head or you will go mad off base. Cost of living in the UK is bloody high and getting higher. Shop on base as much as you can for the stuff you need, but do go out to the market towns and spend a few quid out there. Just accept that a dollar doesn't get you what a quid (slang for the pound) used to.

Pubs. Not just for alcoholics. Pubs do not have a direct translation in the US. Especially in villages and urban neighborhoods, they have a social standing and community role that no place in the US equals. They are where drinks are drunk, rounds are bought, friendships are made, stories told, life happens. Do not underestimate the importance of the pub to your experience of the UK. Find a local you like and become regulars. It will enrich your time there immeasurably.

Eating out, especially at pubs, is pretty reasonable. The beer is wonderful. All of it. Some is maybe less wonderful than the other, but it's still all wonderful. Make a habit of hitting village pubs as often as you can. Many will welcome dogs.

Well, that's about all the pontificating I can think of right now. Feel free to PM me if I can be of any more help. As I say, my USAF knowledge is going to be a bit out of date, but I just left the UK last year and can fill you in on life in general a bit. In any case, enjoy the place. I envy you going over for your first time.

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One thing I'll add that nobody else has: after about a month in, go buy an Ordnance Survey map of your village and go for a walk to a rural pub. Britain has a wonderful system of walking trails and they've mapped their country to a ridiculous level of detail. There's something fantastic about taking a walk with the dogs to a small local that has probably been serving ale longer than the US has existed as a nation.

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Live off base. No reason whatsoever to need a year to "adjust" to ENGLAND. Amazingly, the people speak ENGLISH.

Is that the language they speak over there? Could've fooled me. Of course they'll tell you they invented the language....whatever. Just remember to put some randoum "u"s in when spelling and you'll be ok. Two nations separated by a common language.

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About the dining experiance of England, for God sakes don't eat at a Wimpy Burger you will be disappointed. If you like Tex Mex in the states learn to make it yourself and hopefully the large Commisary on Lakenheath has what you want. Now if traveling and you stop in a small village aroud lunch time Pub Grub is the way to go. I remember when we had a shop barbecue at somebodies house off base it seemed like pray call for the Brits to come over and join the fun as soon as we had meat on the grill. A good rule of thumb is that Catsup is about as spicy as a Englishman cooks with. Cucumber sandwiches and prawn flavored crisps are not bad. Mildenhall village had a good Chinese takeout when I was there plus alot of Indian cusine with all their curry dishes. Plus in the larger citys like Cambridge they have a Pizza hut and McDonalds Etc. Anybody , does Mildenhall still the Maurder pizza place it was good? Plus the bowling alley on Mildenhall made a decent burger.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk...ngland-16492649

Air Force telling people base housing must be filled first because of "Budget restraints". I'd do everything you can to get around this.

Only get to spend time there when broken on tail swaps. Would give a major part of my anatomy to be stationed at the box D.

Unfortunately, I heard this is for true for all ranks until they get up to 98% occupancy, which might take a while. Living out in town is one of the best things about being stationed here, so I hope they don't take that away. If you can get off base, I highly recommend Bury St Edmunds. You can walk everywhere, Abby gardens, pub on every corner, great restaurants, plenty of shopping, movie theatre and friendly people. Good luck Kayla!

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Great advice all around. If I may add, make a concerted effort to meet as many Brits as you can. They are really a great people, friendly with a good (albeit sometimes wierd) sense of humor. I enjoyed not only being stationed there, but the couple of trips I've been able to make back.

If it were more affordable, and I could have my guns for sporting purposes, I'd seriously consider moving back!

Enjoy your assignment, and don't waste a second of it as it will go by quickly!

Cheers! M2

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Another update to the mandatory on base housing is that it would only be for your first year in country, then you could move out on the economy.

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Another update to the mandatory on base housing is that it would only be for your first year in country, then you could move out on the economy.

I went to the Mildenhall/Lakenheath Spouse (club) page on FaceBook, and from what I read on there, it's for E7's and below. I went to the Lakenheath website, and it had a section for "Housing rumors" and the wing Commander addressed the rumor of making people stay on base... from the gist that I got, it was for Enlisted peeps only. Neither articles actually gave a rank, though. I only heard/read the rank on the Spouse page.

Anyone know for sure?

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Anyone know for sure?

Theoretically it applies to everyone, but most officers qualify for bigger housing, so you won't be forced in there. The memo said SOME O-3's and below MAY be affected. I don't know what the exact cutoff criteria are though.

The best way to find out would be to have your husband call the Housing office via DSN and ask if he'll be affected by this and what the current on-base housing situation is for officers of his grade and number of dependants. You could call yourself commercial, but then you'd have to pay or the international call.

PM me if you need the phone number.

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I sat through a staff meeting on Friday about the new housing policy. The E1-E6 memo (to maximize occupancy of Lord's Walk, a just-off-base dilapidated housing area) is a directive underneath a broader initiative to guarantee 98% government housing occupancy.

So to be clear, everyone is affected by the new initiative. When you arrive, you will be offered government housing. New inbounds will be prioritized to move immediately if there's an available house. The officer waiting list is maxed-out to move people off-base to on-base, but if you get here and there's an open house, you'll bump people out of the way (since the wing has to use its own money to move people from the economy to government quarters).

If you move on base -- as long as the current directive holds -- you will not be able to move off base and receive OHA. So make sure you know what you want before you get here or figure it out quickly during your 15 days of TLA.

FWIW, we lived on the economy in Bury for the first 9 months and then moved on base to new Lakenheath housing (Liberty Village) prior to heading downrange. It turned out to be the best move in our situation due to some pregnancy complications that developed while I was deployed. If you have any family members on EFMP, you may be seen on base at Lakenheath or at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge.

I have no idea how the ops tempo is on the Mildenhall side of things, but get some honest feedback from your sponsor and some friends that are already over here. You (and your children if you have any) will be the ones spending the vast majority of the time in your house and relying on the services of the surrounding community.

PM if you need any more info on the area. Best of luck!

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Couple of questions about England. For TV's I've read some about NTSC vs PAL. My tv is somewhat older and it says PAL-N and PAL-M but I think UK uses PAL-I and it wouldn't be compatible. Is this true? Is it easy to just buy TVs over there and not go through the hassle of trying to get converters or whatever you need. Also, for single guys is Cambridge worth the drive or do a lot of people stay around Bury and Newmarket? Thanks.

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Cambridge is excellent.

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