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I've heard that before but it's interesting to revisit it again.  

The thing that blows my mind (from an F-15C perspective) is the guy doing most of the talking is the backseater(RIO) in the lead aircraft.  Thank goodness for single seat fighters. 

A few observations:

"AB" (whoever that is, puts them on weapons hold).

The backseater then directs a series of 30 degree offsets to assess the bogies intentions. Bogey heading remains steady at 330-340 through the the intercept.  First he goes left and then goes back right across their nose.  Any of us who have done any intercepts know how little the geometry of the intercept is going to change out at 50-60 miles after the initial offset of 30 degrees.  If he stayed left, it might have worked. Going back right just heated the intercept back up and put the F-14s back on the bogey's nose.  Any "jinking back into me" by the bogies that was perceived by the lead RIO was really just a result of the intercept geometry he created and a tendency of the F-14 radar to display erratic heading information on track-while-scan targets under ownship maneuvering.  All they did was basically zig-zag across the MiG's noses while they drove on a steady north-northwesterly heading.

The lead pilot tries to call AB when they arm hot since they are still under weapons hold.  "Uh, wait a minute..... AB from 207".  Shortly after that, the lead RIO takes the first AIM-7 shot (can you imagine having weapons coming off your jet without your consent as PIC?).  The pilot had no idea the shot was coming until it left the jet, hence his "Aw Jesus" exclamation.  Talk about the tail wagging the dog.  First AIM-7 doesn't guide due to switch error (I think it was an F model that wasn't tuned properly).  They have to follow up with another at close range pre-merge.

The second F-14 pilot, who gets the AIM-9 kill, can't get a tone because..... wait for it.... He doesn't have AIM-9 selected.  So, big surprise, no tone.  When he finally does get the weapon he wants to shoot selected, his 9L works like a charm.

Score two for the good guys, but what a cluster.  They're lucky the political climate lent itself to bitch slapping Gaddafi at every opportunity.

Edited by JeremiahWeed
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Commercial Airline Bombing History; Excerpts/tidbits

Summary; These cases graphically demonstrate the dangers explosives have posed to commercial aviation in over 70 years of recorded incidents. The full extent of these airline bombings can be appreciated when considering them in total. These 88 criminal acts destroyed 50 aircraft and damaged 32 more resulting in 2,790 deaths and 129 injuries. At least 33 of the bombings are known or strongly suspected to be terrorist attacks while 14 were a combination of suicide or murder attempts often coupled with insurance schemes. Four bombings were due to miscellaneous or accidental causes while the motive behind the remaining 37 is undetermined.

These statistics are summarized below by year. Bombings were worst during the 1970s and 1980s and at least one incident occurred every year from 1964 through 1989 with the lone exception of 1977. The single worst year was 1985 when five attacks resulted in 332 deaths, nearly all of these aboard Air India 182 alone. Airline bombings became less common through the 1990s and into the 21st century, but terrorism remains a grave threat to commercial air travel as shown by the hijackings and suicide attacks of 11 September 2001.

 

http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/planes/q0283.shtml

A few examples that seem similar to what may have happened to Kogalymavia Flight 9268 on 31 Oct 2015;  

23 June 1985 - Air India Flight 182
The deadliest terror attack of any kind prior to September 11 was Air India 182, a flight from Montréal to London to Delhi to Bombay. The Boeing 747 carried a total of 329 (307 passengers, 22 crew) when it disappeared over the Atlantic Ocean south of Ireland. A bomb located in the forward cargo hold had detonated at an altitude of 31,000 feet (9,500 m) causing rapid decompression and break-up of the plane. A second bomb was also to be transferred aboard Air India Flight 301, scheduled to carry 177 passengers from Tokyo to Bangkok. However, this bomb exploded at the Tokyo airport killing two baggage handlers and injuring four others. The attacks were blamed on a Sikh separatist group called Babbar Khalsa, but only one person was convicted for the attack after almost 20 years of investigation and prosecution by Canadian authorities. Bomber Inderjit Singh Reyat had his prison term reduced to just five years in exchange for testimony against other alleged plotters, but he was later sentenced to another nine years for perjury.

21 December 1988 - Pan American World Airways Flight 103
Pan Am 103 departed London bound for New York City when the Boing 747 was destroyed over Lockerbie, Scotland. The plane was brought down by 340 to 450 grams of plastic explosives hidden in a radio cassette player that was detonated in the forward cargo hold. The bombing killed 270 people including 243 passengers, 16 crewmembers, and 11 victims on the ground. A three-year joint investigation by the UK and US concluded two Libyan intelligence officers were behind the plot, and both men were finally turned over by the Libyan government in 1999. One was convicted in 2001 while the second was acquitted, and Libya agreed to pay compensation for the attack.

24 August 2004 - Volga-AviaExpress Flight 1353
A wave of terror attacks on Russia began with a pair of bombings aboard two airliners. The first was Volga-AviaExpress 1353, a Tu-134 flying from Moscow to Volgograd. Contact with the plane was lost about 26 minutes after takeoff when witnesses on the ground reported seeing a large explosion. All 43 occupants (34 passengers, 9 crew) were killed. Later investigation found the crash was caused by a female suicide bomber named Amanta Nagayeva who was from the separatist region of Chechnya.

Wreckage of Volga-AviaExpress Flight 1303 destroyed by a Chechen suicide bomber

Wreckage of Volga-AviaExpress Flight 1353 destroyed by a Chechen suicide bomber

24 August 2004 - Siberia Airlines Flight 1047
Minutes after the Volga-AviaExpress crash, a Siberia Airlines flight from Moscow to Sochi also disappeared. The Tu-154 was carrying 46 people (38 passengers, 8 crew) and reportedly broadcast a hijack warning shortly before crashing. There were no survivors. This attack was also made by a female Chechen suicide bomber named Satsita Dzhebirkhanova. A group called Islambouli Brigade initially claimed responsibility for the two bombings, but leading Chechen terrorist Shamil Basayev denied this and said he organized the attack. A week after the two airline crashes, a bomb at the Moscow subway station killed 10 people. Shortly thereafter, the Beslan hostage crisis in September resulted in 335 deaths.

 

Searching the remains of Siberia Airlines Flight 1047 after it was bombed
Searching the remains of Siberia Airlines Flight 1047 after it was bombed

 

 

 

 

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Seaplanes...

Got way off topic in the China thread on seaplanes but thanks to that diversion I found this gem about some other seaplanes (British) I had not heard of, specifically: 

Sander-Roe SRA/1

sra1_01.jpg 

71-1.jpg

Good historical film and documentary on the biggest seaplanes still operating:

 

Sea Dart is still best idea in the opinion of this aviation nut...

 

 

 

 

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On March 12, 2016 at 7:23 PM, Jughead said:

59 years ago today, the prototype for the mighty -135 flew its first transcon test.

 

Check out the 10th picture for ol' Tex Johnston's briefing style...!  :beer:

God bless that man.

Roll at about the 0:59 mark

Not related to the roll or Tex but just a wish that I could have seen some of these golden days of aviation...

91cdfc8c31d72f10017f1ecd7539c12d.jpg  232920611948336592BxcFHwXgc.jpg 

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Actually. I was there the day Tex rolled the -80.  I grew up in Seattle and the big event that day was the annual Gold Cup unlimited hydroplane races on Lake Washington My dad, brother, and I went and were sitting on the grass next to the lake (with one or two hundred thousand others).  My dad worked for Boeing as a buyer at the Renton plant and was fairly knowledgeable about the program but not an aviator.  Midway through the day between heats, they announced the flyby, and the aircraft came from the South (Renton) and as it came abeam the VIP barge near the pits, it smoothly pulled up, rolled, and departed to the north.  About 5 minutes later  it returned and repeated the roll before departing the area.  I was a little uncertain about what I'd seen so I asked my dad about it.  I recall he was a little stunned but really didn't say too much.  I thought it was kind of cool.

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I just finished reading his book (Tex Johnston) and I really enjoyed it.  If you enjoyed Bob Hoover's book then go pick it up.   

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This seemed like the most appropriate place for this.  If not, please point me to the correct thread.

I've had a lifelong goal of owning a "legit" warbird (which I've mentioned on here, previously).  I'm finally in a position where I can legitimately think about buying a T-6 in the next two years.  I've been an aircraft owner since 05 and have a strong background in both civil and military aircraft MX (particularly, I know what the challenges of maintaining an old radial are...and I used to help my Dad maintain an SNJ).  My current aircraft co-owners (also AF pilots) are on board.  So, the ass pain seems to be worth it to me/us at this point.  Two questions for those who have some experience and contacts in this area:

1) Besides controller, trade-a-plan, and platinum fighters, does anyone have a good resource for finding said aircraft?

2) Mostly out of curiosity, does anyone know why TBMs are so "cheap" (when compared to other warbirds): http://www.platinumfighters.com/#!warbirds/c1q5a

Incidentally, you can pick up a complete (in pieces) T-28 for $35k or a whole bunch for $300k...  Seems like a deal if your convieniantly aligned...

Edited by zrooster99

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Thanks!  My Dad had a civilian 337 when I was going to the zoo.  Great airplane!  Flies like a big "heavy" 182...  Definitely a cool option.

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On ‎8‎/‎13‎/‎2016 at 3:21 AM, zrooster99 said:

1) Besides controller, trade-a-plan, and platinum fighters, does anyone have a good resource for finding said aircraft?

..........................

 

Incidentally, you can pick up a complete (in pieces) T-28 for $35k or a whole bunch for $300k...  Seems like a deal if your convieniantly aligned...

If you're on Facebook, the group "Round Engines Forever!" has a lot of knowledgeable folks on board, who currently own/operate radials for both work and pleasure.  It's a private group and they actively weed out idiots, so the signal/noise ratio is favorable; you might find some resources there.

That lot of T-28s on Platinum has apparently been for sale for at least a decade (I learned this from the above-referenced FB group).  I don't recall seeing an explanation for why they haven't sold, but there's got to be a good reason why no one in the warbird resto business has snapped this lot up, if for nothing else than salvageable parts and engine/prop cores.

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On August 17, 2016 at 4:51 AM, JarheadBoom said:

If you're on Facebook, the group "Round Engines Forever!" has a lot of knowledgeable folks on board, who currently own/operate radials for both work and pleasure.  It's a private group and they actively weed out idiots, so the signal/noise ratio is favorable; you might find some resources there.

That lot of T-28s on Platinum has apparently been for sale for at least a decade (I learned this from the above-referenced FB group).  I don't recall seeing an explanation for why they haven't sold, but there's got to be a good reason why no one in the warbird resto business has snapped this lot up, if for nothing else than salvageable parts and engine/prop cores.

Thanks!  And, you're exactly right, if they've been there that long, there's got to be a good reason.

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Big Blue Corporate: 

"Hmmm, so we're having trouble retaining 'droid operators.

"We're having trouble retaining aircraft pilots.

"Say, boss, I've got this idea..."

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