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TTP

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About TTP

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    SNAP
  1. I called USAA and they stated the Limitless Card wasn't available in my area (NW Florida) yet. They were unable to provide an estimated timeline. So, no card for me...
  2. Copy all. I searched the USAA site and no luck. Apparently I'm not a part of the Limitless club. I'll give them a call next week. Thanks for the help!
  3. I can't seem to find the USAA Limitless Card on their website. I read on another website that the USAA Limitless Card was released in Fall 2016 to a small sample group on a trial basis. Seems like a good deal that I'd like to take advantage of. For those that have it, how did you get it?
  4. TTP

    The Altitude Chamber

    Andrews has one as well. Call to schedule: DSN 857-4654 or Commercial (240) 857-4654
  5. I think what personal finances really come down to is your approach toward money. Meaning some people have no idea where their money is being spent, which is why David Ramsey is popular with some people (personally I never heard of David Ramsey until a couple months ago). He offers a very simple, common sense approach to making a budget and spending only cash to ensure you know how ever dollar is spent. This can help some people develop a solid understanding of where their cash is actually going. For others, he is far too basic as they have moved well beyond his baby step system. I've always had a budget, and that didn't change when I got married. Budgets are useful in two ways. If you are having problems with money, a budget can help provide insight to where your money is going. These people need to reference their budget on a daily basis to ensure each and every dollar is in line with their plan. Otherwise things can spiral out of control fast. For others, a budget is simply a good sanity check that should be referenced every 1-2 months to ensure their spending matches their plan. These people have developed the financial discipline and long-term financial look to basically be on autopilot. To help spur further discussion, here is my family's (1 wife, 2 young kids) budget. I’ll use percentages of gross income to help make it transferable to others. Investments: 30% Rent: 18% Taxes: 13% (Federal, FICA, SS, Medicare; no state taxes) Leisure: 6% (restaurants, baby sitter, movies, etc) Groceries: 5% (I am shocked at how much food costs!) Autos: 4% (own both cars outright, this is gas & maintenance fund) Charity: 4% Utilities: 4% Kids stuff: 4% (clothes, toys, books, shoes, sports, etc) Vacation fund: 3% Medical/Dental/Life & Home & Auto Insurance: 3% Pre-school: 2% Christmas gift fund: 1% Cell phones: 1% Misc: 2%
  6. Single source income. Just hit the 14-yr mark. I am a pilot and currently on the bonus (annual gross approx $155k), but we've been investing 30% +/- of my gross for a few years now. I think one year the investments got as high as 40% gross. We realized that was a bit extreme and backed off a little. No debt of any type. Being financially secure is a great feeling! Really appreciate all of the great financial advice and perspective everyone brings to this site.
  7. One data point: we've been investing roughly 30% of my gross income for the last several years. Start by maxing out two Roth IRAs and the TSP. On top of that we put $500/month in a 529 and invest another $1k/month in a variety of stocks and mutual funds. Goal is to stop working by 55 and pay for the kids college. So far we're on track...
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